The Jewish Press

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  1. What? You're surprised? When a Jew marries out his/her faith, they're "less engaged" in that faith? No kiddin! Whut a surprise: A hristian marries a Jew and sunnenly, the marriage is, shall we say, "Judenrein"/ Their mother probably never told them what my Mother usta tell me: MARRY A JEWISH GIRL!!"

    SHE WUZ RIGHT!!! All three of my marriages have been to Jewish women: One died; the second divorced me, and I'm still happily with my third wife!!!

    Comment by Richard Marcus — October 31, 2013 @ 8:35 PM

  2. Unfortunately, the title of this article seriously misrepresents the study it refers to. As the primary author of this study I would like to put the record straight.

    Big Tent Judaism/Jewish Outreach Institute is a New York based nonprofit working to promote a more inclusive Jewish community and advocating for greater inclusion of intermarried couples, including their adult children.

    In our study we compared two groups of people who are very similar in many respects: they describe themselves as “engaged” in Jewish life, say that being Jewish is important to them, and plan to raise children who are Jewish by religion. The only difference was that one group had two Jewish parents whereas the other group had one parent who is Jewish and another who is from a different background. We found that while, on the one hand, both groups express similar levels of interest in Jewish activities for different sorts, the degree to which they act on this interest within Jewish institutions (synagogues, JCCs, etc.) is considerably lower. We also found that while for those with two Jewish parents the transition to parenthood is associated with greater denominational affiliation (what we call “the kid bump”), Jews with one Jewish parent (once they themselves become parents) experience a “kid bump” in their level of engagement, but this does not translate into greater identification with a denomination.

    While the interpretation of these findings is (and should be) open to discussion, our respondents suggest that greater openness and sensitivity on the part of Jewish institutions is sorely needed.

    We hope this note can put the record straight and move the discussion in the right direction – what are the best ways to better welcome and include adult children of intermarriage, who are likely to rapidly become the majority of North American Jewish community? To view the full report please click here: http://bit.ly/HsUr8z

    Shabbat Shalom,

    Zohar Rotem
    Program Officer for Evaluation
    Big Tent Judaism/Jewish Outreach Institute

    Comment by Zohar Rotem — November 1, 2013 @ 2:30 PM

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