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  1. 123% sounds like a lot. But look at how ridiculously small the numbers are that we're talking about — 2534 versus 1133, or a difference of 1401 units. There are SIX MILLION Jews living in Israel. The average size of a household in Israel is 3.73 people. That means there are roughly 1.6 million Jewish households.
    http://www.cbs.gov.il/hodaot2011n/11_11_025e.pdf

    So an additional 1400 housing starts in Yehuda and Shomron is .00875 of ONE PERCENT of the Jewish households in the country. Completely trivial and meaningless. This has nothing to do with anything other than Obama's ego and his continuing desire to destroy Western civilization (most of which he's destroying without any direct reference to the Jews).

    Comment by Louie V. Yadua — March 3, 2014 @ 6:59 PM

  2. Keep building in OUR LAND!

    Comment by Reyna Cohen — March 3, 2014 @ 10:42 PM

  3. Is anyone stopping the Arabs from building housing in these areas?

    Comment by Alan Kardon — March 4, 2014 @ 4:15 PM

  4. Numbers don't lie but liars & propagandists misstate numbers to paint a picture far from the truth…….

    Comment by Earl W. Littlefield Jr — March 4, 2014 @ 5:51 PM

  5. The Myth of Israel's SettlemThe Myth of Israel's Settlement Boom
    Tuesday, March 04, 2014 | Israel Today Staff

    The presentation of these numbers is ill-informed, at best, and purposely deceptive, at worst.
    The reason for the seemingly enormous increasing in “settlement activity,” as many Israeli officials pointed out, was that for much of 2012 there was a building freeze imposed on Jewish construction in the disputed territories.

    Fueling recent heavy criticism of Israel amidst ongoing US-brokered peace talks is the perception that construction of new Jewish homes on lands claimed by the Palestinians skyrocketed over the past year.
    Even Israeli newspapers on Tuesday ran reports that while new building starts in Tel Aviv had decreased by 19 percent in 2013 compared to the previous year, Jewish construction in the so-called “West Bank” had shot up by 123 percent.
    The presentation of these numbers is ill-informed, at best, and purposely deceptive, at worst.
    The reason for the seemingly enormous increasing in “settlement activity,” as many Israeli officials pointed out, was that for much of 2012 there was a building freeze imposed on Jewish construction in the disputed territories.
    So, naturally, any new building in 2013, regardless of how minuscule by comparison to other parts of the country, would register as a major upswing in national statistics.
    To put the numbers in perspective, 1,133 Jewish housing units (primarily apartments) were built in Judea and Samaria in 2012. In 2013, that number increased to 2,534 units, hardly a building boom.

    ent Boom
    Tuesday, March 04, 2014 | Israel Today Staff

    The presentation of these numbers is ill-informed, at best, and purposely deceptive, at worst.
    The reason for the seemingly enormous increasing in “settlement activity,” as many Israeli officials pointed out, was that for much of 2012 there was a building freeze imposed on Jewish construction in the disputed territories.

    Fueling recent heavy criticism of Israel amidst ongoing US-brokered peace talks is the perception that construction of new Jewish homes on lands claimed by the Palestinians skyrocketed over the past year.
    Even Israeli newspapers on Tuesday ran reports that while new building starts in Tel Aviv had decreased by 19 percent in 2013 compared to the previous year, Jewish construction in the so-called “West Bank” had shot up by 123 percent.
    The presentation of these numbers is ill-informed, at best, and purposely deceptive, at worst.
    The reason for the seemingly enormous increasing in “settlement activity,” as many Israeli officials pointed out, was that for much of 2012 there was a building freeze imposed on Jewish construction in the disputed territories.
    So, naturally, any new building in 2013, regardless of how minuscule by comparison to other parts of the country, would register as a major upswing in national statistics.
    To put the numbers in perspective, 1,133 Jewish housing units (primarily apartments) were built in Judea and Samaria in 2012. In 2013, that number increased to 2,534 units, hardly a building boom.
    The Myth of Israel's Settlement Boom
    Tuesday, March 04, 2014 | Israel Today Staff

    The presentation of these numbers is ill-informed, at best, and purposely deceptive, at worst.
    The reason for the seemingly enormous increasing in “settlement activity,” as many Israeli officials pointed out, was that for much of 2012 there was a building freeze imposed on Jewish construction in the disputed territories.

    Fueling recent heavy criticism of Israel amidst ongoing US-brokered peace talks is the perception that construction of new Jewish homes on lands claimed by the Palestinians skyrocketed over the past year.
    Even Israeli newspapers on Tuesday ran reports that while new building starts in Tel Aviv had decreased by 19 percent in 2013 compared to the previous year, Jewish construction in the so-called “West Bank” had shot up by 123 percent.
    The presentation of these numbers is ill-informed, at best, and purposely deceptive, at worst.
    The reason for the seemingly enormous increasing in “settlement activity,” as many Israeli officials pointed out, was that for much of 2012 there was a building freeze imposed on Jewish construction in the disputed territories.
    So, naturally, any new building in 2013, regardless of how minuscule by comparison to other parts of the country, would register as a major upswing in national statistics.
    To put the numbers in perspective, 1,133 Jewish housing units (primarily apartments) were built in Judea and Samaria in 2012. In 2013, that number increased to 2,534 units, hardly a building boom.

    The Myth of Israel's Settlement Boom
    Tuesday, March 04, 2014 | Israel Today Staff

    The presentation of these numbers is ill-informed, at best, and purposely deceptive, at worst.

    The reason for the seemingly enormous increasing in “settlement activity,” as many Israeli officials pointed out, was that for much of 2012 there was a building freeze imposed on Jewish construction in the disputed territories.

    Fueling recent heavy criticism of Israel amidst ongoing US-brokered peace talks is the perception that construction of new Jewish homes on lands claimed by the Palestinians skyrocketed over the past year.

    Even Israeli newspapers on Tuesday ran reports that while new building starts in Tel Aviv had decreased by 19 percent in 2013 compared to the previous year, Jewish construction in the so-called “West Bank” had shot up by 123 percent.

    The presentation of these numbers is ill-informed, at best, and purposely deceptive, at worst.

    The reason for the seemingly enormous increasing in “settlement activity,” as many Israeli officials pointed out, was that for much of 2012 there was a building freeze imposed on Jewish construction in the disputed territories.

    So, naturally, any new building in 2013, regardless of how minuscule by comparison to other parts of the country, would register as a major upswing in national statistics.

    To put the numbers in perspective, 1,133 Jewish housing units (primarily apartments) were built in Judea and Samaria in 2012. In 2013, that number increased to 2,534 units, hardly a building boom.

    Comment by Ltc Howard — March 4, 2014 @ 11:15 PM

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