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The Charleston Hashkafa

I used to work in a school where the question often arose as to whether I am yeshivish or modern Orthodox.
hashkafa charlston

Over the past ten months that we’ve lived in Charleston, SC, I’ve written about a number of reasons why we love living here: the beautiful downtown, the warm and embracing Jewish community, the amazing people we have met, and, of course, the dolphins.

Those are all true. But I’ve avoided writing about one reason, the main reason that I feel I’ve found a haven in this beautiful city: I rarely hear the words “modern Orthodox.” Nor do I hear the word “yeshivish.” People here do not know about, nor participate in what I non-affectionately call “the hashkafa (religious worldview) wars.”

I used to work in a school where the question often arose as to whether I am yeshivish or modern Orthodox. My students would analyze my practices to decide which camp I fall into. No TV – must be yeshivish. But she teaches oral law to women and loves learning halacha – modern Orthodox. Wears a sheitel without leaving out a lot of hair – yeshivish. Does not accept the concept that rabbis are infallible – modern Orthodox. Back and forth they would go, trying to neatly stack me and my husband in one of the two boxes that they knew.

I loved those kids, I loved the school, and I loved the community. And I would excuse these questions as coming from kids who have limited experience with different hashkafot. But the truth is, these questions are not limited to high school students. I’ve been asked by adults—very knowledgeable adults at that—from New York and from smaller communities, and even by friends. “I just don’t get you,” they’ll say, “What are you?”

And at moments like these, I feel bad for God.

Modern Orthodoxy is not a religion, although, quite honestly, I sometimes believe that people lose sight of what it’s all about and prioritize their hashkafa over God Himself. The words “modern Orthodoxy” mean, and should mean, something different to each person. There is no one modern Orthodox model, nor is there is one yeshivish model, and a person shouldn’t have to belong inside boxes.

The Talmud mentions a number of questions that God will ask us after 120 years. Among them are: Did you deal ethically in business? and Did you set aside time for Torah study?

I don’t profess to know it all, and I’ve never been dead before, but I can promise you: God will not ask if you stood rigorously on the principles of modern Orthodoxy. Nor will He ask if you followed the community’s standards of what is considered to be “yeshivish enough.”

We just enjoyed a fantastic Shavuot retreat in Charleston. Our committee worked incredibly hard on the program, ensuring that every detail would go well. The food, the decorations, the accommodations, the welcome bags… But what we realized is that there are two details (probably more) that you have no control over. The weather (which was, baruch Hashem, amazing) and the kind of people who attend your program. If people are complainers, or unfriendly, and refuse to mingle—you have a disaster of a program, no matter how well you planned.

When I first saw our participants on Friday night, I admit I was a little nervous. It was a real mix: some women wore sheitels and had husbands with beards, other couples appeared more “modern.” Would they mingle, I wondered, or stick to their hashkafa groups? Would our Charleston Jews see an example of the religious divide that often exists “up North?”

I feel so blessed to report that throughout the entire program, our participants were warm and friendly to each other and to our local Charlestonians (and amazingly, did not complain at all! Not only that, several sent donations and letters of appreciation!!!).

Hashkafa was not an issue. People mingled, they made new friends and it did not seem to matter if you came from Teaneck, Monsey or Los Angeles. It was fascinating, because while they came to absorb Charleston culture, they actually got a glimpse of what Charleston is all about without realizing it: there is no hashkafic divide in Charleston. There are no separate communities of yeshivish and modern Orthodox and shomer Shabbat and not-Shomer Shabbat. We are all one people.

About the Author: Ariela Davis is a native New Yorker, and the Rebbetzin of Charleston, South Carolina’s historic Orthodox synagogue, Brith Shalom Beth Israel. A veteran educato, she in New York, Israel and Houston, and was recently hired as the Judaic Studies Coordinator of Addlestone Hebrew Academy, Charleston’s Jewish day school. She writes a blog called Constant Comments, which includes meaningful and often humorous perspectives on her life as a Rebbbetzin in the deep South.


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9 Responses to “The Charleston Hashkafa”

  1. Goldie Stern says:

    Very true. sometimes I guess we have to get away from New York to realize that all Jews share so much more than just Haskafa.

  2. Ariela Davis says:

    Imma, you may not post on Savta a"h page.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Thank G-d! I have always been against labelling groups and defining oneself by labels. It may be efficient for different reasons but the price in terms of lack of unity are very high- too high. In Morocco there was no reform, conservative, or other groups. There was just the Torah- either you followed more of it or less of it. No groups were defined and named to put people in according to how observant they were. They respected the tzaddikim and saw how holy they were- there was not so many divisions as we find today. Too many groups today each one trying to define themselves and justify their existence by how different they are from another group. When people ask me what I am I say I AM A JEW! Of course they want to know more because I am from Moroccon descent- speak english fluently and often go to a Breslov shull that has mostly sephardic. So they want to know if I consider myself Brfeslov? I say, I am a JEW. And where there are minhag differences then I am obligated to follow the Sephardic tradition. As to why I am there- its becasue I go where I can find the truth and I find alot of truth in Rabbi Nachman's teachings. That does not make me a Breslovler. I also study the laws of Loshon hara from the Chafeitz Hayyim- that does not make me a Polish Jew?

    Enough with these divisions. LETS JUST FOCUS ON WHAT WE ARE- JEWISH!

    The differences in groups in percentage terms compared to what is similar is less than 1%. Its true- it just seems more becasue our brains are formatted to spot differences and movment- its a security device. But if you really look at it. How many differnent mitzvoth and behaviours are obligated in general. I would say over 5,000. We agree on almost all the basics. There are just usually technical little thnigs that differ.

  4. Jacob Alperin-Sheriff says:

    I'm yirtza Hashem the Charleston community will soon grow large enough so that people can start judging you properly.

  5. Ze'ev Gotkin says:

    There was once a time when Charleston, SC was one of the largest – if not the largest – Jewish communities in the US. It was mostly Sefardic and wealthy.

  6. Ze'ev Gotkin says:

    Yeah, this is all because it is 'out of tow'n lol.

  7. Jacob Alperin-Sheriff says:

    One non-Chabad Ortho shul town. We judge just fine in Atlanta and we're 'out of town'

  8. Grace Acosta says:

    You think that's hard, try being "Sephardanazic Ashkephardic" and married into Lubatitch. I'm a hot mess! ;-)

  9. Jacob Alperin-Sheriff says:

    Lauren Sherman isn't this your homegirl?

Comments are closed.

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I used to work in a school where the question often arose as to whether I am yeshivish or modern Orthodox.

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