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Answering the Most Difficult Question About the Agunah Crisis

Ethical and moral laws in the Torah depend on the context. Kindness and virtue largely depend on the subjective expectations of one’s friends and community.

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The ongoing conversation about the agunah problem in the wake of the Gital Dodelson article in the NY Post consistently raises one impossibly difficult question. I’ve been asked this question many times and in many different ways. In my opinion, it’s the fundamental issue of the agunah crisis.

The public is justifiably angry with a husband who does not give a get. But the recalcitrant husband has a pretty compelling argument in his favor.

The Torah itself gives the husband absolute authority in the matter of the divorce. If this is Torah law then we are forced to say that this is God’s will. If God gave the power of divorce to the man alone, how can it be considered wrong or evil if he does not give his wife a get? And how can we call it an injustice when he does not give a get? Don’t blame the husband, blame the Torah. The Torah is at fault. God is at fault. Change the laws of divorce and the problem will be solved!

Some variant of this question is the crux of the agunah problem. In simple terms, why is the husband a bad guy when he doesn’t give a get if God gave him the power to decide if he wants to give the get? It is a very difficult question for an Orthodox Jew. And now it is being asked over and over again.

I think I have an answer to this question.

It’s true that in terms of divorce law, the power to divorce vests in the husband and he is the only one who can dissolve a marriage. The husband must willingly give the get. We are stuck with that law. Pure legalistic Torah matters are almost always unassailable. There is almost no way for contemporary rabbinic authorities to change a law derived from the Torah or even established by Chazal. There’s just no acceptable mechanism within Orthodox Judaism to make changes to Torah law.

(Rabbinic laws often have loopholes baked into the law, e.g. eruvei chatzeros, eruv tavshilin. Pruzbul and hefker beis din hefker are examples of the rabbis creating a legal fiction that circumvents Torah laws with regard to money, they do not change the actual Torah laws.) 

The thing is, divorce law is not the only part of the Torah that informs us how to behave in case of divorce. That part of the Torah will never change. There are other parts of the Torah that do fluctuate and are subject to societal norms and niceties. Ethical and moral laws in the Torah depend on the context. Kindness and virtue largely depend on the subjective expectations of one’s friends and community. Perhaps at one time a certain act or behavior was considered normal and fair. But at a different time it could be considered evil or wrong. Things in this arena are more subjective and they do change. These bein adam l’chaveiro elements of the Torah always apply and I think they are especially important during a divorce.

• One is obligated to love his fellow as himself. “That which is hated to you, do not do to others.” Would a husband want his wife to hold him hostage? No. Thus it is prohibited to hold the wife hostage.

• It is prohibited to cause an animal pain. All the more so it is prohibited to cause pain to a fellow human being. Withholding a get causes extreme pain to the estranged wife.

• One who causes emotional damage to another person is obligated to compensate the victim. One cannot act in a way that causes other emotional harm. R’ Elyashiv paskened that sexual abusers were rodfim (pursuers) because of the emotional harm caused by their violence toward their victims. Causing another person emotional harm is a very serious issue and is absolutely against the Torah.

• The Torah requires that we help unload the animal of our enemy. Many authorities learn from this that we are required to lend a helping hand to anyone who requires help. Does a wife waiting for her get not require assistance?

• We are obligated to follow in the merciful ways of God. Is it merciful to withhold a get? Clearly not. A recalcitrant husband violates this mitzvah as well.

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About the Author: Rabbi Eliyahu Fink, J.D. is the rabbi at the famous Pacific Jewish Center | The Shul on the Beach in Venice CA. He blogs at finkorswim.com. Connect with Rabbi Fink on Facebook and Twitter.


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5 Responses to “Answering the Most Difficult Question About the Agunah Crisis”

  1. Ron says:

    Disregarding all facts I am hearing about who is indeed the “normal” spouse. Both of them feel that they would rather have custody than have the option to remarry. Using the get as ransom is the act of his, but continued on by her refusing to concede on the same thing he wants.
    Time for them to realize the is only one cookie in the jar

  2. Ch Hoffman says:

    the good rabbi obviously feels that if husbands and wives got along better with one another during their divorce proceedings and if they were both much nicer people, then the issues of agunah would not arise.

    Well, that's pretty disingenuous; if they got along better, then all issues revolving around a divorce would get resolved amicably – financial, custodial, visitation, and the issuance of a get would be a piece of kugel

    however, the Rodney King "can't we all just get along" doesn't quite work so well in most divorces; that's why there are lawyers, courts, and a lot of angry ex-spouses.

  3. Ch Hoffman says:

    the good rabbi obviously feels that if husbands and wives got along better with one another during their divorce proceedings and if they were both much nicer people, then the issues of agunah would not arise.

    Well, that's pretty disingenuous; if they got along better, then all issues revolving around a divorce would get resolved amicably – financial, custodial, visitation, and the issuance of a get would be a piece of kugel

    however, the Rodney King "can't we all just get along" doesn't quite work so well in most divorces; that's why there are lawyers, courts, and a lot of angry ex-spouses.

  4. You may not be aware that Weiss has recently published what he wants:

    1. Better custody that Weiss can get from civil court.

    2. Dodelson's parents have to pay him $350,000 as secutiry that Dodelson does not go to court to challenge the Weiss-favoring custody agreeement.

    3. An undisclosed sum of money for damages.

    So, it's not a matter of good spouse- bad spouse. This is what Weiss has now announced he is demanding as a condition to giving his ex-wife a get.

    If there is anything in the Torah that prevents a man from giving his ex-wife a get without extorting her, please post here.

  5. Amy Fields says:

    I am a young catholic woman working for a fathers rights attorney that practices in NYC. In the past few years we have helped represent several Jewish men in divorce.

    Reading the article today has made me have to comment, a practice I normally vehemently refrain from doing.

    The Civil Divorce system is broken. Men have very little rights if any, and only those that can afford high priced attorney's have any chance at all of coming out with anything but huge debt. The rest are systematically destroyed and many are even jailed. The system creates criminals out of good men fathers and the women get away with lying and manipulating the courts with full immunity from the law.

    I am not familiar with this particular case but have seen several very similar.

    In over 80% of all cases its the women that wants the divorce, the men are usually the ones that fight to keep the marriage going. The women then have to force the issue by hiring an attorney and suing in court for the divorce. The majority of divorce lawyers follow the same path and that is to get the husband out of the home as quickly as possible. They then proceed to reduce him to nothing more then a welfare state for the wife in the most disgusting and demeaning way.

    The easiest and quickest path to this is to start by turning them into criminals. It is common practice to immediately get restraining orders based on lies or exaggerated truths because we all know nothing will happen to the woman. What's worse is the husband has no clue that its happening and isn't even allowed to defend himself until its to late.

    At that point its all down hill for him. Most men go into panic mode and actually do break the law in one way or another thus proving the need for the restraining order to begin with. CAUSE AND EFECT. Its perfect tactics and works 99% of the time.

    For me as a young woman working for a fathers rights attorney, the shame of it is we don't have more orthodox Jewish clients because the rest have absolutely no recourse whatsoever. Suicide is not uncommon.

    The answer is for all divorcing couples to be civil and collaborate, and this is especially true with Orthodox Jewish women. Most if not all of you bring this upon yourself. If you live by your faith you die by your faith and anything you will do will be judged by your faith.

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