web analytics
October 21, 2014 / 27 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance
Blogs
Sponsored Post
Meir Panim with Soldiers 5774 Roundup: Year of Relief and Service for Israel’s Needy

Meir Panim implements programs that serve Israel’s neediest populations with respect and dignity. Meir Panim also coordinated care packages for families in the South during the Gaza War.



Two Different Tracks: Women and Tefillin vs. Women and Torah

two tracks

One of the more interesting ways to frame the question of Orthodox Jewish women wearing tefillin is in the context of yesterday’s post. (See: Life is in its Struggles: Dealing With the Tough Questions)

Many of the statements made about women in the Talmud that sound offensive to us relate to women studying Torah. The objections to women learning Torah are mostly an issue of cognition or intellectual prowess. Regardless, the accepted unequivocal conclusion of the Talmud is that women should not study Torah.

The parameters of this prohibition are not as broad as the Talmud seems to imply. The most restrictive opinions in the achronim say they may only learn the laws that are relevant to their practice. The Rambam says they are only prohibited from studying the Oral Law but he seems to hinge it upon their overall academic abilities which are fluid and subjective. The Chida famously said that if a woman wants to learn she can learn whatever she wants.

The point is that the very harsh statements of the Talmud regarding teaching women Torah has been narrowly tailored even according to the least permissive opinion. No one reads the halachic part of this rabbinic ban on Torah study for women without some form liberal interpretation.

When we contrast this with the statements of the Talmud regarding women wearing tefillin we see the opposite process. The Mishna simply says that women are exempt from tefillin. The Talmud never says explicitly that women should not wear tefillin. The Sefer HaChinuch discusses whether women would make the blessing on tefillin without saying that it is prohibited. We don’t know if women actually did wear tefillin but from a Talmudic perspective, they would have been allowed to wear tefillin.

Instead, the Rama is the one who makes the liberal statement of the Talmud more restrictive than it’s simple reading. The Rama says that women are exempt from tefillin but they should be strongly discouraged from wearing them. As an aside, I think it is reasonable that the Rama’s citation that women should not touch Torah scrolls is relevant and might have influenced his tefillin position. Something to think about.

Fast forward to 2014 and it’s not just that they should be discouraged, it’s that it’s prohibited altogether. It’s even been said that women wearing tefillin today is a form of sectarianism. This is so far from the position stated in the Mishnah that it has to make us wonder how this happened.

I think it is worth noticing that these two trains are going in opposite directions on two different sets of tracks. I can’t explain or account for these very different story lines with any degree of certainty but I do have a guess. It could be that in the view of the poskim along the way, the leniencies regarding studying Torah are a “necessary evil” but are not ideal at all. It was just impossible to tell girls that they cannot study Torah in modern society. Plus there is the Chida. There is no such necessity for tefillin and there is no Chida (although there is the Chinuch and Michal bas Shaul).

That does not account for the increasingly stringent views on tefillin. That might just be the same as any other increasingly stringent halachic development. The combination of necessary and precedent might explain the reason for increasingly liberal positions on Torah study for women. It might also provide the blueprint for adjustments to our views on women wearing tefillin and other similar issues. Time will tell.

Visit Fink or Swim.

About the Author: Rabbi Eliyahu Fink, J.D. is the rabbi at the famous Pacific Jewish Center | The Shul on the Beach in Venice CA. He blogs at finkorswim.com. Connect with Rabbi Fink on Facebook and Twitter.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

7 Responses to “Two Different Tracks: Women and Tefillin vs. Women and Torah”

  1. The question is, why do they want to wear tefillin. If a woman wants to wear tefillin because she feels closer to Hashem and more spiritual, that is one thing. But if she wants to wear tefillin because men do so” why shouldn’t she!” or, as some WOW supporters say, “they want to liberate Orthodox women”, that is quite something else. I have an acquaintance who went to a woman’s minyan because she felt it would enhance her Yiddishkeit. She stopped going after a few times because she found there was less spirituality and more of an agenda going on.

  2. JD Méndez says:

    Women, plural. Thus the correct English would be “women ARE”. Having said that, tefillin are the visual reminder to the promiscuous male how NOT to behave which, in today’s world, is very pertinent to the behavior of some women. That’s why women wear tefillin; to remind themselves and others about a code of conduct increasingly under attack.

  3. WRONG if they believe in the Torah it’s doesn’t say woman are supposed to wear tflin, STOP this craziness woman are not allowed ,u r making fools out of you’re selves

  4. WRONG if they believe in the Torah it’s doesn’t say woman are supposed to wear tflin, STOP this craziness woman are not allowed ,u r making fools out of you’re selves

  5. Max Aaron says:

    Women can and should learn Torah. But Tefillin is a man’s obligation. It’s not a matter of sexism, G-d gave the comandment of wearing Tefillin to men alone.

  6. So now after 3300 years of not really wearing Teffelin we figured out we are wrong or smarter then those before us ???

  7. From all the articles I’ve read and even from these comments I think the issues have to be separated, is a woman not being allowed to wear tefillin because it is not halachically correct or is it not allowed because of the
    reason the woman may want to wear the tefilllin.
    Women do not do what they do to compete with men! Isn’t it possible women do what they do because they what want to!

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Facebook post from man believed to be Canadian convert to Islam who rammed soldiers with his car in possible terrorist attack, Oct. 20, 2014.
‘Radicalized’ Convert to Islam Attempted to Murder Canadian Soldiers [video]
Latest Blogs Stories
256px-Israel-Palestine_flags.svg

Polls indicate that the Palestinians are much more against a two state solution than the Israelis.

Doug Goldstein

Has the Jewish world adapted to the times? Hear the answer with Doug and his guest, Rabbi Berel Wein.

NY rally against Met Opera's 'Death of Klinghoffer' opera. Sept. 22, 2014.

Leon Klinghoffer’s daughters: “‘Klinghoffer’ is justified as ‘a work of art’…This is an outrage.”

eg

Kids bring in the light and let out the darkness through breathing exercises; it changes people.

If I make a million dollars in 2 weeks, how can I observe something like this and sit by quietly?”

Sometimes collective action against the heinous acts of the majority is not enough. The world should not only support the blockade of Gaza; it must enforce the dismantling of Hamas.

How long will it take for Israel and the Jewish World to admit that we are in very serious danger?

How do changes in technology affect the human life and our interactions with each other?

Palestinians (and Jordanians) often use the term “provocation” regarding Israeli action in Jerusalem

The zealots who engineered the ban have been publicly disgraced.

I am sick and tired of this one way street boycott! Time to boycott all products developed or invented in the Palestinian controlled areas! Let’s start with……umm….

Such an incredible miracle to have Israel, it’s crazy that every Jew isn’t clamoring to live here!

Driving is cultural. I come from a place with incredibly polite and safe drivers, unlike Israel.

My difficulties persisted until I met a beggar outside a restaurant after Tisha B’Av 12 years ago.

I’m more worried about the dangers of the Palestine virus than the Ebola one.

“Nonsense” seems to be the New York Times sense of balanced and accurate coverage.

More Articles from Rabbi Eliyahu Fink
QuestionsandAnswers-logo

People act not because they think it’s right; they do what they do because it’s what they want to do

Dusk in the early morning hours seen from Mt Meron, Northern Israel. March 26, 2014.

What do we do when we want to be mad at God but we also want God to make it all better? Indeed, what do we do?

Rambam would also allow charity from a mumar as long as the person maintains basic belief in God and Judaism.

There is no song that tells the story of freedom like Shir HaShirim.

It is unfair to judge a 52 year old man with the glasses of a person who lives in a different world.

Adegbile was not making a moral statement by representing a man convicted of killing a cop.

Women learning Torah is becoming increasingly permissive, but women wearing tefillin is becoming increasingly stringent.

When the “offensive” statements in our Talmud were stated, no one thought they were offensive.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/fink-or-swim/two-different-tracks-women-and-tefillin-vs-women-and-torah/2014/03/02/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: