Photo Credit: YouTube
Yoram Hazony in a YouTube clip from Oct. 2012.

As I said, I’m sure that many of my friends on the left will be disappointed in me. But perhaps not all of them. Jewish philosopher, Dr. Yarom Hazony is by any definition a ‘lefty’. He is a founder of the Shalem Center and a champion of Dr. Eliezer Berkovits having re-published many of his works in addition to works of his own. He has recently written an article in Torah Musings about an experience he had at an Open Orthodox event that reinforces my views here. He too questions whether the theological direction in which they are going is indeed Orthodox.

Dr. Hazony attended that event one Friday evening. It took place at an Orthodox Shul that featured among other things a discussion of biblical scholarship. What was alarming to him was the overall unchallenged acceptance by all the presenters that evening of biblical scholarship – denying that anything in it is factual up to the book of Samuel. And the audience seemed to buying it. No one challenged anything they said save for one elderly individual who asked, “Don’t any of you believe that God gave the Torah to Moses at Sinai?”. He was immediately dispatched with the following comment by the moderator who said:

There are some people who think that they can tell God what he can and cannot do. There are some people who think they are so clever that they can know, on God’s behalf, whether he had to give the Torah to one person at one time, or whether he could have given the Torah gradually, in an unfolding fashion, over the course of many generations. And that’s the answer to that question. Next question.”

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Dr. Hazony continues:

Unfortunately, there is nothing I can do to recreate the extraordinary degree of condescension, the sheer meanness, with which this answer was used to dismiss the old gentleman’s line of thought as illegitimate and not worthy of consideration.

That there was no Sinai moment and instead we have an unfolding revelation may be a subject worthy of discussion in Academic circles, says Dr. Hazony. Nonetheless I think he sums up the problem with it in the following statement:

But the fact that something has become a constant refrain in certain intellectual circles does not yet make it a good idea, much less a significant theological position. Perhaps I’ve missed something, but I have not yet seen a carefully constructed and systematically worked out version of an Orthodox Jewish theory of “unfolding revelation,” and I doubt that one exists.

I suppose this might actually make Dr. Hazony and Rabbi Perlow strange bedfellows. When both the right and the left have the same problems with a movement, I think it is time for that movement to have some serious re-thinking of just how far they want to push their theological envelope.

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13 COMMENTS

  1. good article. By rejecting past miracles that the Jews experienced, they are suggesting that G-d is incapable to provide these things when his children needed them…

  2. Oh boy… Something about this article just feels wrong, like the intuition meter has a buried needle on this one. Not necessarily saying the man doesn't have well founded sentiments, but on the other hand, one cannot make such blanket judgements and speak with accuracy for everyone.

  3. The author, obviously very religious is expressing his views. As for the crossing of the Red Sea (which is really very blue), the underwater land banks has been found, Israel knows about it so does Saudi. In Korea there is a similar phenomena. That events happened at Mt. Horev in the Sinai desert, no doubt about that, Mt. Sinai is considered a Holy Mountain by the locals. That the laws given were phenomenal in their time is tremendous; when considering the state of civilization at that time and in fact, it has not really changed. We murder one another, we steal and rob, we cheat and lie and these laws recognized our weaknesses and we are told to change or wicked ways. Somewhere in the universe these laws and their ugly side – and there are ugly sides, work but not in this world.

  4. Agree absolutely. Seems the Jews have the same problems we face in the Christian churches!!! There are so many false teachings which creep in. Which is why I study the Word of G-d and believe it and obey it and measure everything to it and discard of everything which does not.

  5. So if you don't believe every word of the Bible, you're a heretic, Harry? Well, I don't believe every word in the Bible, and it's been scientifically proven that the Bible (Torah, Tanach, whatever you want to call it) is a big bubbemeisa starting with the first sentence…In the beginning God created…in six days, and on the seventh day He rested. We all know that the universe is approximately 13.8 billion years old (give or take several hundred million), not 5,775 1/2 years. If that's wrong, then what's right?

    I guess that makes me, a Reform Jew, a heretic — and an apikorus. It also makes me right.

  6. The Bible is actually accurate from beginning to end, it is science that has more to explain and offers just a fairytale for grown ups. About half the scientists today are creationists but would lose their jobs is they said so openly. Creation Ministries International is a movement of Creation Scientists who know both evolution and creation theories and you can go to their FB page CMI and debate real scientists there and receive research documents each day if you like their page, they have about 8000 articles if you really want facts and are willing to study into the subject.

  7. Lize Bartsch Lemme ask you this: If the Flood as depicted in the Bible is accurate, the earth was covered with water over 3 miles deep (Mt. Ararat is over 16,000' high and it was totally submerged). That's over 600 million CUBIC MILES of water, not counting what's currently in the earth's oceans, seas, and lakes.

    Where did all this water go? Did God just raise his mighty arms and all the water disappeared?

    Now I know dinosaurs co-existed with man: I'm a big fan of the Flintstones, and everything you watch on TV is as accurate as what's portrayed in the Bible, so it all must be so, nicht wahr?

  8. Dan Silagi , these are just the kind of questions the scientists of CMI love to answer, I will try with my unscientific limited knowledge to give you some idea. The Bible does not only say it rained for 40 days but also that the fountains of the deep broke open. There are huge underground lakes, I suppose the water drained back into underground lakes and reservoirs and the rest evaporated. The earth's water levels did increase after the flood. Every continent could be connected to each other if the waterlevel was lowered by just a few meters (the continental shelf). So before the flood it might well be that all countries were connected.

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