web analytics
December 29, 2014 / 7 Tevet, 5775
 
At a Glance
Blogs
Sponsored Post
8000 meals Celebrate Eight Days of Chanukah – With 8,000 Free Meals Daily to Israel’s Poor

Join Meir Panim’s campaign to “light up” Chanukah for families in need.



Is Hatred for Haredim Due to Media Bias?

The record number of kipa-wearing Jews in the new Knesset surely shows that secular Jews do not really hate religious Jews.
Israeli Finance Minister Yair Lapid addressing the Knesset, April 22, 2013.

Israeli Finance Minister Yair Lapid addressing the Knesset, April 22, 2013.
Photo Credit: Miriam Alster/FLASH90

I am a huge fan of Rabbi Emanuel Feldman. I rarely disagree with him. The former editor of Tradition Magazine and vice president of the RCA who led a shul in Atlanta, Georgia, is a gifted speaker and is one of the most talented and fair-minded writers on the Orthodox scene I have ever read. His educational history speaks to his broadminded approach to issues of the day. He attended Yeshivas Haim Belrin and Ner Israel where he received smicha (certification as a rabbi) and then went on to get his bachelors and masters degrees from Johns Hopkins and a doctorate in religion from Emory University.

One of his greatest achievements was taking a pulpit in a shul where only two out of 40 families were Shomer Shabbos and which had no mechitza (barrier between men and women for prayer). A couple of years after he became the rabbi there, he managed to install one. His courage in putting his job on the line after the mechitza was removed – insisting that he would not continue as their Rabbi if it were not re-installed has made him a hero of mine…  It should have served as an example to many traditional rabbis who took non-mechitza shuls. While I cannot judge them as a whole, I think more than a few simply did not have the courage to do what Rabbi Feldman did. I have to believe that at least in some cases they could have done so without losing their jobs. But I digress.

Rabbi Feldman (who is the brother of R’ Aharon Feldman, Rosh Hayeshiva of Ner Israel) has written a critical article in last week’s Mishpacha Magazine about media bias against Haredim in Israel. His focus was on their reportage of Haredim ignoring the solemnity of Yom HaShoah – Israel’s Holocaust Memorial Day.

There is hardly a family in Israel that has not lost a relative in the Holocaust. It is a solemn day in Israel. There are no picnics or barbecues on that day. There are instead many events that deal with the pain of loss. One of the things they do on that day is turn on a siren. Most of entire country stops at that moment. People driving their cars stop many get out and stand in silences while the siren sounds as a sign of respect for the dead.

While there is some criticism from the right about the “Jewishness” of this custom, there ought not be nay question about what to do during that time. Nor should there be any question about whether to join in the day’s solemnity by not holding any ‘fun’ parties or picnics.

Rabbi Feldman is very clear in his condemnation of the Haredim who ignore this day in spite! – having picnics and barbecues in the park while the rest of the country mourns. Whatever their complaints about the government or when and how such days are observed, the fact that some Haredim are so callous that they treat it like the fourth of July is like spitting at the survivors and their families.

Rabbi Feldman’s problem is that the same media that rightly objects to the way some Haredim behave on this day, does little to report on the reverse when it happens:

[D]o the ever-vigilant secular watchdogs get into similar high dudgeon when non-religious Israelis display their own brand of insensitivity toward sacred religious days? On Tisha B’Av, the historic day of national Jewish mourning for the sacking o Jerusalem and the Holy Temples, do the media scour the countryside in search of Israelis who carry on normally: shopping, going on outings, attending pork-serving restaurants and pubs? …And on Rosh Hashanah, when millions of Jews are in synagogue returning to God and praying for a good year for everyone, is there editorial indignation at those secular Israelis who spend the day at the beach, or fly off to the garden spots of Europe?

I do not see this as the same thing at all. As a matter of fact, Rabbi Feldman answers his own question?

Granted, such people are a tiny minority who don’t know any better, and the vast majority of Israelis do honor the High Holidays.

But then he hedges:

But then again, the [H]areidi disrespecters of Yom HaShoah were also a tiny minority — which did not prevent bitter condemnation of all [H]areidim.

He goes on to explain why such people exist. I agree that it is in part the fault of the secular education system which is woefully lacking if – as he says – the typical teenager thinks that Moshe Rabbenu and Moshe ben Maimon (the Rambam) are one and the same person.

Where I part company with Rabbi Feldman here is that a religious Jew should have compassion for fellow human beings. They know about the Holocaust. They are not disrespecting an ancient tradition that they have little if any knowledge of. Ignorance may not be an excuse for secular Jews to ignore Tisha B’Av. But the willful indifference – which this tiny minority of Haredim do when they have picnics on days where the rest of the country mourns is much worse. They are salting fresh wounds.

And just like Rabbi Feldman can justifiably lay some of the blame for secular ignorance about Tisha B’Av or Yom Kipur at the door of the secular educational system, so too should he put the blame for those Haredim whose indifference to the suffering of people who lost loved ones in the Holocaust at the door of Haredi education.

In fact I suggest that the willful and constant condemnations of Israel’s founders and leaders does far more damage to the fabric of Judaism than the absence of religious education in the secular educational system. Not knowing something at least leaves you with a Tabula Raza – a blank slate. A blank slate can learn in unbiased ways. But when one is indoctrinated with hatred – it is much more difficult to unlearn that hatred and becomes sensitive to the feelings of those you hate.

Yes, I know that hate goes both ways. But hate – breeds hate. Besides, the last election in Israel shows very clearly that secular Jews do not really hate religious Jews. The record number of kipa-wearing Jews in the Knesset surely shows that.

I think if Rabbi Feldman would step back; look at two communities objectively and see what I see, he will have a change of heart.

Visit Emes Ve-Emunah.

About the Author: Harry Maryles runs the blog "Emes Ve-Emunah" which focuses on current events and issues that effect the Jewish world in general and Orthodoxy in particular. It discuses Hashkafa and news events of the day - from a Centrist perspctive and a philosphy of Torah U'Mada. He can be reached at hmaryles@yahoo.com.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

2 Responses to “Is Hatred for Haredim Due to Media Bias?”

  1. Anonymous says:

    JOIN THE HELLO PROGRAM FOR RELIGIOUS SECULAR UNITY!

    We need to develop and implement actions of Unity- Achdut. I suggest we start the following simple campaign. Every reader of the letter should simply say hello- how are you? to one secular Jew per day if he is already not doing so. That simple hello will lead the secular Jew to say hello to the religious Jew in return!
    Simple- we are now saying hello to each other. Next each reader should get his religious friends to join this program of saying hello asking them to also get more friends to join. This could lead to thousands of hellos per day. Will you do it for the love of Hashem?

    ITS TIME FOR ACTION!

  2. Dan Silagi says:

    If you want to be religious it's your personal choice. You're no more being disrespectful of Shabbos observers by not observing the day than you are being disrespectful of Christians by shopping on Sunday. Same goes for any Jewish holiday and religious custom, Yom Kippur and Kashrut both included. Most Jews aren't religious, and greatly resent any effort to impose religion upon them, especially by their fellow Jews.

    On the other hand, days such as Holocaust Memorial Day affect virtually all Jews, most of whom have lost ancestors to the Holocaust, as Maryles correctly notes. So having picnics and barbeques, especially in close proximity to Vad Vashem would be considered a slap in the face to all Jews, both secular and religious. It's tantamount to dancing on one's mother's grave. Therein lies the difference.

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Binyamin and Chaya Maryles, uncle and aunt of Emes Ve-Emunah author Harry Maryles.
Current Top Story
Brandeis University junior Khadijah Lynch who tweeted she has "no sympathy" for slain NYPD officers, shown here on "Wake Up With Tayla Andre, "Dec. 24, 2014.
A War of Words (Some More Accurate Than Others) at Brandeis
Latest Blogs Stories
Diogenes searching for an "Honest Man"

Corruption accusations are commonplace in Israeli politics, defining it’s political landscape.

Game of Groans

The Likud falls in the Center where Bibi wants it. But how many voters want a parve/neutral party?

Doug Goldstein

Marketing isn’t only about selling a product, the “power of eventually” will help you to succeed.

My stairs had been built, big and strong-BUT ON THE WRONG SIDE OF THE APARTMENT!

Is his article satire? Or does Kai Bird really think Tzipi Livni heads a “center-right” party?

Much as I’d like to see the Jewish nation fully observant forcing Shabbat on people is NOT the way.

Loyalty seems to be a lost trait in Israeli politics, whether it’s to ideals, principles or parties.

Apartment hunting is kinda like dating: You go see anything that looks right on paper-and pray.

Latest headlines say that Prime Minister Bibi Netanyahu’s Likud may only make third place if…

What are the roles of leadership and communication in running a “tight ship”?

Sabraman: Israel’s first superhero, combining the courage of the Sabra and the faith of Abraham.

Is Haredi open-ended learning on charity better than earning a living that would obviate that?

Hanuka is the miracle of emunah- belief in the L-rd of Israel and the light of our faith.

Limiting Jewish success and revival is that the anti-Jewish, anti-History Left rules here in Israel

The crisis in Jewish education is of existential importance. How should it be resolved?

More Articles from Harry Maryles
Diogenes searching for an "Honest Man"

Corruption accusations are commonplace in Israeli politics, defining it’s political landscape.

Shabbat Table

Much as I’d like to see the Jewish nation fully observant forcing Shabbat on people is NOT the way.

Is Haredi open-ended learning on charity better than earning a living that would obviate that?

The crisis in Jewish education is of existential importance. How should it be resolved?

Nothing binds Jews together more than Torah observance; Or so one would think.

When Rabbi Shafran, Chief Spokesman for Agudah talks about his own battle with heresy, that’s news.

The shelf life of parliamentary government is about 2 years, hardly enough time to get anything done

Obviously, the better part of caution is to report credible reports of abuse directly to the police.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/haemtza/is-hatred-for-haredim-due-to-media-bias/2013/04/30/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: