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5 COMMENTS

  1. When I was serving in the IDF in the 1980s, a pack of dogs (i.e. canines) approached me as I waited to hitch a ride. I unlocked the safety on my weapon and I was ready to open fire, but something unseen distracted them and they ran in a different direction. If a pack of dogs like the ones you described would attack me, I would react the same way. In attacking an IDF soldier, they cross a line and side with our enemies, and deserve to be treated as such. At the same time, it greatly pains me to say this, because what has become of our people that would make me need to react like this.

  2. it's a bit of rhetorical overkill.
    these were people, not dogs.
    they did what they did out of malice (which a dog doesn't have), hatred (which a dog can't have).
    they should be punished as people.
    and because they were "haredi", their leaders themselves could punish them.

    cherem – or shunning.
    within a religious community, if these people are still accepted in the shuls, in the beit medrash, etc. then it's their leaders who should also be held in contempt.

  3. Those who attacked the soldier weren't dogs. They were men. Of course the Rabbis who lead them bear a large part of responsibility, but it doesn't remove the guilt from the men who acted. each of us is responsible for his/her actions. I say charge the Rabbi for the crimes they committed: Hate speech and crime abetting, but don't let off the hook the men who deliberately carried out the Rabbis' tacit order: they committed assault and battery and should also face a court of law.

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