web analytics
December 8, 2016 / 8 Kislev, 5777
Blogs
Sponsored Post
The Migdal Ohr Mishpachton MISHPACHTONIM – Israel’s Children are Your Children.

Support Migdal Ohr by purchasing letters in the Torah Scroll that will be written in honor of Rabbi Grossman’s 70th Birthday.



How to Say ‘Sand’ in Hebrew


Printer-Ready Page Layout
dunes



חוֹל

 listen and repeat
Last week, I wrote a post on the Hebrew term for mermaid and how that relates to the name of the Israeli coastal town, בַּת יָם ( listen and repeat) – Bat Yam.
Here’s a post about sand, which inspired the name for Bat Yam’s next-door neighbor town, חוֹלוֹן ( listen and repeat).
The Hebrew word for sand is חוֹל ( listen and repeat). In the plural, it’s חוֹלוֹת ( listen and repeat), for example:
זֶה הָלַךְ לְאִבּוּד בְּחוֹלוֹת הַזְּמַן.
It got lost in the sands of time.
 listen
 
The Israeli city חולון was named after an ancient town mentioned in the biblical book of יְהוֹשֻׁעַ ( listen and repeat) – Joshua, though that town was most likely located in the Judean Hills, far from today’s metropolitan Tel Aviv area. Why transplant the name of a far-off town to one situated on the sandy coast? Because today’s חולון was built on top of small hills of sand.
The word חול referring to sand sounds and looks the same as the word חול referring to something profane or not sacred, but the two words are not related. The root of חול meaning sand is ח.ו.ל (kh.w.l), while the root of חול meaning profane is ח.ל.ל (kh.l.l).

Visit Ktzat Ivrit .

Ami Steinberger

About the Author: Ami Steinberger is founder and director of Ulpan La-Inyan.

The author's opinion does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Jewish Press.

If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.





Imported and Older Comments:


Kitzat Ivrit Logo
Current Top Story
Knife used in attempted terror attack at Tapuach Junction in Samaria, Sept. 16, 2015.
Terrorist Neutralized in Attack at Tapuach Junction

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/ktzat-ivrit/how-to-say-sand-in-hebrew/2013/07/02/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: