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Don't let the IRS make you unhappy!

For more information on the IRS targeting American tax filers in Israel, see this article, “Americans in Israel Under IRS Scrutiny for Child Credit Claims” by Eric Kroh. Yihiyeh Biseder!

PS: Kudos to the underground “industry” of return preparer and services who caused this massive Chilul Hashem.  You know who you are, and you will be audited a thousand times over in hell.

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If you need the name of reputable CPAs in Israel, you can contact me by email.

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2 COMMENTS

  1. I just wonder WHEN our IRS service will begin to be dilligent with the fraud right here in the us. With hispanics claiming children that don'e live in the US much less with them and the prisoners that file for dependants named for Disney characters. It disturbs me that people don't just pay what they owe and get on with life. But to go to Israel to audit is rediculous when they have so much to recover right here.

  2. The translations need not be notarized at all, and the translator need not be "certified". Here is the relevant language from the IRS code:

    (c) Standards for acceptability of submissions of documents in a language other than English and certified English translations of laws in a language other than English. The taxpayer must submit with the request an accurate and complete certified English translation of the relevant parts of all contracts, wills, deeds, agreements, instruments, trust documents, proposed disclaimers, and other documents pertinent to the transaction that are in a language other than English. If the taxpayer chooses to submit certified English translations of foreign laws, those translations must be based on an official publication of the foreign government or another widely available and generally accepted publication. In either case, the translation must be that of a qualified translator and must be attested to by the translator. The attestation must contain: (i) a statement that the translation submitted is a true and accurate translation of the foreign language document or law; (ii) a statement as to the attestant’s qualifications as a translator and as to that attestant’s qualifications and knowledge regarding tax matters or foreign law if the law is not a tax law; and (iii) the attestant’s name and address.

    This is something I've done for several clients, and there have been no problems with the translations.
    Contact me – fischer.tirgum at gmail – if you need a translator.

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