web analytics
December 1, 2015 / 19 Kislev, 5776
At a Glance
Sponsored Post

Surviving an IRS Audit in Israel

Don't let the IRS make you unhappy!

Don't let the IRS make you unhappy!

For more information on the IRS targeting American tax filers in Israel, see this article, “Americans in Israel Under IRS Scrutiny for Child Credit Claims” by Eric Kroh. Yihiyeh Biseder!

PS: Kudos to the underground “industry” of return preparer and services who caused this massive Chilul Hashem.  You know who you are, and you will be audited a thousand times over in hell.

If you need the name of reputable CPAs in Israel, you can contact me by email.

About the Author: Jameel blogs at the Muqata: http://www.muqata.com, but these days extensively posts on Facebook. Follow Jameel at https://www.facebook.com/Muqata Wherever I am, my blog turns towards Eretz Yisrael טובה הארץ מאד מאד The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of The Jewish Press.

The author's opinion does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Jewish Press.

If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

2 Responses to “Surviving an IRS Audit in Israel”

  1. I just wonder WHEN our IRS service will begin to be dilligent with the fraud right here in the us. With hispanics claiming children that don'e live in the US much less with them and the prisoners that file for dependants named for Disney characters. It disturbs me that people don't just pay what they owe and get on with life. But to go to Israel to audit is rediculous when they have so much to recover right here.

  2. Elli Fischer says:

    The translations need not be notarized at all, and the translator need not be "certified". Here is the relevant language from the IRS code:

    (c) Standards for acceptability of submissions of documents in a language other than English and certified English translations of laws in a language other than English. The taxpayer must submit with the request an accurate and complete certified English translation of the relevant parts of all contracts, wills, deeds, agreements, instruments, trust documents, proposed disclaimers, and other documents pertinent to the transaction that are in a language other than English. If the taxpayer chooses to submit certified English translations of foreign laws, those translations must be based on an official publication of the foreign government or another widely available and generally accepted publication. In either case, the translation must be that of a qualified translator and must be attested to by the translator. The attestation must contain: (i) a statement that the translation submitted is a true and accurate translation of the foreign language document or law; (ii) a statement as to the attestant’s qualifications as a translator and as to that attestant’s qualifications and knowledge regarding tax matters or foreign law if the law is not a tax law; and (iii) the attestant’s name and address.

    This is something I've done for several clients, and there have been no problems with the translations.
    Contact me – fischer.tirgum at gmail – if you need a translator.

Comments are closed.

muqata logo 486x300
Current Top Story
Ambulance on the scene at mysterious explosion in Istanbul
UPDATED Pipe Bomb Explodes in Istanbul Speculation ISIS or PKK

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/muqata/surviving-an-irs-audit-in-israel/2012/08/09/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: