Photo Credit: Flash90

In the universal contest between the blues and the reds, one side will invariably win, the other lose.

When the reds win, it’s not easy or comfortable for the blues.

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It’s a phenomenon known to us all – being on the losing side.

After the most arduous, contentious, long running and unusual municipal election campaign in Beit Shemesh, the chips fell where they did last night – and the incumbent mayor Moshe Abutbul was re-elected, if by a wafer-thin margin of several hundred votes.

My man, Eli Cohen, called Moshe Abutbul to congratulate him on his victory, and Eli acknowledged his defeat with dignity.

I also congratulate Moshe Abutbul and his many many supporters in Beit Shemesh on their victory.

They worked hard, played hard, and they should enjoy their victory!

I feel like the morning-after-the-night-before – a bit dazed, tired and yes, of course, disappointed.

Someone who experiences defeat without any pain (sadness, dismay, disappointment) is simply not human.

As long as these feelings are temporary and not channeled in a negative way, for example, to feed antipathy against the winning side, pointing fingers at one’s colleagues, etc, these feelings are entirely legitimate and healthy.

A defeat should involve a process of autopsy, analysis, to work out what went wrong, what could or should have been better or different, and hopefully work out an improved game-plan for next time one is involved in a contest or competition.

There’s a balance between picking oneself up, dusting oneself off, determinedly moving on with other day to day challenges – while nevertheless taking the time to do the internal accounting process.

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David Morris has been nominated for the President of Israel's Prize 2010. He is an entrepreneur in the fields of charity and electro-optics; Established Lema'an Achai ("For My Brothers"), the innovative community social services charity in Ramat Bet Shemesh, "Magen", the Bet Shemesh Child Protection Agency, and "Yad LeYedid" (A Hand to a Friend) charity helping impoverished families in Jerusalem. His day-job as Owner/CEO of Scitronix Ltd is marketing sophisticated electro-optical products to high tech industries in Israel. David is the proud dad of six amazing children, and luckiest-husband-in-the-world of Julie Morris.