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Debunking the ‘Palestinians as Native Americans’ Myth

In one anti-Israel protest outside of Nablus, Palestinians even dressed up like Native Americans in order to make a political point.
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Various anti-Israel groups argue that the Palestinians are like Israel’s “Native Americans. However, the truth of the matter is that the Jewish people are the closest thing to an indigenous people within the Holy Land, while the Palestinian Arabs ancestors sprung out from centers of empire.

Despite all of the facts proving the contrary, some anti-Israel activists have falsely compared the Palestinians to the Native Americans. For example, during this year’s Palestinian Solidarity Week at the University of Maryland at College Park, the UMD Students for Justice in Palestine hosted a lecture titled “Two Trails of Tears: From Turtle Island to Palestine.” In this lecture, the UMD Students for Justice in Palestine held a discussion on “settler colonialism, ethnic cleansing, broken treaties and racist policies as a form of systematic oppression for the Palestinian and Native American peoples.”

Unfortunately, the UMD Students for Justice in Palestine is not the only anti-Israel group to seek to compare the Palestinian cause to the Native American struggle. This type of rhetoric disregards Jewish history within the Land of Israel dating back to antiquity and is an attempt to re-write history by anti-Israel groups in order to belittle the Jewish connection to the Land of Israel. This propaganda is so popular among anti-Israel groups that in one anti-Israel protest outside of Nablus, Palestinians even dressed up like Native Americans in order to make a political point. Many Native American’s find this offensive and an unethical form of cultural appropriation.

As Ryan Bellerose, a member of the Métis nation in Canada, wrote in the Metropolitan,

The Palestinians are not like us. Their fight is not our fight. We natives believe in bringing about change peacefully and we refuse to be affiliated with anyone who engages in violence targeting civilians. I cannot remain silent and allow the Palestinians to gain credibility at our expense by claiming commonality with us.

I cannot stand by while they trivialize our plight by tying it to theirs, which is largely self-inflicted. Our population of over 65 million was violently reduced to a mere 10 million, a slaughter unprecedented in human history. To compare that in whatever way to the Palestinians’ story is deeply offensive to me. The Palestinians did lose the land they claim is theirs, but they were repeatedly given the opportunity to build their state on it and to partner with the Jews — and they persistently refused peace overtures and chose war. We were never given that chance. We never made that choice.

According to Ward Churchill, a professor of ethnic studies at the University of Colorado, 12 million Native Americans used to inhabit North America in 1500. They were the continent’s first original indigenous human inhabitants and some of the tribes referred to their ancestral homeland as Turtle’s Island. Yet today, after experiencing massacres, persecutions, outright racism, ethnic cleansing, systematic oppression, and having their traditional lands colonized by European settlers who refused to permit them to live beside them even if they were peaceful and adopted aspects of European culture, their population size was reduced to 237,000 by 1900.

During the infamous Trail of Tears, about 20,000 Cherokees were forcefully expelled from their homes and sent on a death march, where up to 8,000 of them perished. The Cherokee nation endured all of this suffering, despite the fact that they were very much assimilated into the society, rejected utilizing violence, and had legal documents in their possession demonstrating what land was supposed to belong to them. It was one of the darkest chapters in American history.

Despite all Palestinian propaganda points to the contrary, the Palestinians are not Israel’s “Native Americans.” In fact, the Jewish people, composed of the twelve tribes of Israel, not Muslim Palestinian Arabs, made up the majority of the population in Israel up until 135 CE, when the Jewish people through massacres, brutal oppression, persecutions, and ethnic cleansing were forcibly made into a minority within their own country. Just like the Native Americans, the fact that Jews were made into a minority within their own country does not rob them of their indigenous status nor does it imply that they abandoned their country.

In fact, Jews continued to live in Israel throughout history, regardless of which regime was in power. The Jewish Virtual Library estimates that in 1517, well before the Zionist movement existed, there were only around 300,000 people living in Eretz Yisrael, where 5,000 of them were Jewish. According to the Ottoman Turkish Census of 1893, there were 371,959 Muslims, 42,689 Christians, and about 9,000 Jews living in Israel. These statistics demonstrate that Jews were living in the Land of Israel well before Zionism and the Balfour Declaration. Muslims were never the sole inhabitants of the land like the Native Americans were in the United States.

Arab Muslims only started to arrive in Israel in the seventh century and only made up a majority of the population in Mamluk times, 1260-1560. Yet, most modern Palestinians are not even descended from Arab Muslims who arrived in the seventh century.

Yoram Ettinger, for example, has written in Israel Hayom that:

Palestinian Arabs have not been in the area west of the Jordan River from time immemorial; no Palestinian state ever existed, no Palestinian people was ever robbed of its land and there is no basis for the Palestinian claim of return.

Most Palestinian Arabs are descendants of the Muslim migrants who came to the area between 1845 to 1947 from the Sudan, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, as well as from Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Yemen, Libya, Morocco, Bosnia, the Caucasus, Turkmenistan, Kurdistan, India, Afghanistan and Balochistan.

On March 31, 1977, Zahir Muhsein executive committee member of the Palestine Liberation Organization said in an interview with the Dutch newspaper Trouw,

The Palestinian people does not exist. The creation of a Palestinian state is only a means for continuing our struggle against the state of Israel for our Arab unity.

In reality today there is no difference between Jordanians, Palestinians, Syrians and Lebanese. Only for political and tactical reasons do we speak today about the existence of a Palestinian people, since Arab national interests demand that we posit the existence of a distinct ‘Palestinian people’ to oppose Zionism.

For tactical reasons, Jordan, which is a sovereign state with defined borders, cannot raise claims to Haifa and Jaffa, while as a Palestinian, I can undoubtedly demand Haifa, Jaffa, Beer-Sheva and Jerusalem. However, the moment we reclaim our right to all of Palestine, we will not wait even a minute to unite Palestine and Jordan.

There are even some Arab Muslims who are prepared to admit the historic truth that the Palestinians have not been in Israel for all eternity. Even Rashid Khalidi, a prominent anti-Israel, Palestinian academic, wrote in his book Palestinian Identity, “There is a relatively recent tradition which argues that Palestinian nationalism has deep historical roots.” He continued, “Among the manifestations of this outlook are a predilection for seeing in peoples such as the Canaanites, Jebusites, Amorites, and Philistines the lineal ancestors of the modern Palestinians.” Khalidi cautioned against making such assertions and argues that Palestinian national identity is relatively modern.

However, the fact that the Palestinians are not the original inhabitants of Israel nor ever lived as the sole exclusive people within the Holy Land is not the only reason why the UMD Students for Justice in Palestine and other anti-Israel groups are incorrect in their assessment.

While the Native American population has shrunk from 12 million people in 1500 to 237,000 in 1900, the world’s Palestinian Arab population has grown from 660,641 in 1922 to 11.2 million in 2011. Furthermore, while the Native Americans in the Trail of Terrors were forced off their ancestral homeland and sent on a death march, the Palestinians in 1948 were given the option of having their own state on part of the Jewish nation’s ancestral homeland, while the Arab inhabitants of the Jewish state were to be granted equal citizenship rights.

The Palestinian Arab leadership chose war instead and approximately 750,000 Arabs fled their homes, never to return, while 160,000 Arabs refused to flee and became Israeli citizens. To date, the Palestinians have rejected every offer to have a state to call their own on part of the Jewish homeland, while Israel’s Arab population has been thriving and now represents 20 percent of the population. Given these facts, how can one refer to the Palestinian situation as settler colonialism, ethnic cleansing, systematic oppression, racism and broken treaties? Ironically, unlike in the Native American situation, the only ones who have broken peace treaties are the very people who falsely claim to be Israel’s Native Americans. As Winston Churchill once stated, “A lie gets half way around the world before the truth has a chance to put its pants on.”

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About the Author: Rachel Avraham is a news editor and political analyst for Jerusalem Online News, the English language internet edition of Israel's Channel 2 News. She completed her masters degree in Middle Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University. The subject of her MA thesis was: "Women and Jihad: Debating Palestinian Female Suicide Bombings in the American, Israeli and Arab media."


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20 Responses to “Debunking the ‘Palestinians as Native Americans’ Myth”

  1. I am a Jew, but part of my family was also “Cherokee.” I am part of the Vann family who had lands, race horses, slaves, a river boat and made the Trail of Tears in carriage. Many Cherokee today fantasize about being part of the Lost Tribes, e.e., Jewish. But if “Palestinians” want to imagine they are like Native Americans, they need to consider something. There are reservations, but for the most part the Peoples were treated worse than any Palestinian, they have all but lost their culture, their religion(s), and have not fared well in general. I most ways they are hardly distinguishable from other poor people. Palestinians are about as ‘Indian’ as the Cleveland Indians and the Atlanta Braves.

  2. Arie's Pragmatic Politics says:

    "Palestinians" are native as extremist Islam is "native" to civilization. An inherent oxymoron.

  3. Eugenie Misheal says:

    The funniest thing about this article is that the author disproves his own thesis.

  4. Omar Sakr says:

    It's almost a joke.

  5. Omar Sakr says:

    It's almost a joke.

  6. Tim Upham says:

    The Palestinians were never decimated by smallpox, measles, and influenza, like the Native Americans were. Illiteracy among the Palestinians were not handled by rounding up all the children, and sending them to boarding schools to forcibly learn Hebrew. The Palestinians were not placed on reservations or stations, where they had to live with historical enemies. This comparison is an insult to indigenous peoples, such as the Native Americans, Native Australians, Ainu, and Saami, who were the victims of epidemics of foreign diseases, and forced assimilation. Forced assimilation is more in the history of the Jews, than it is in the Palestinians. Also, the bubonic plague first appeared in the Middle East, before it came to Europe, and both Muslims and Christians thought it was due to breathing bad air. But sectarian violence can make people do some awfully stupid things.

  7. Tim Upham says:

    Cultural Survival deals with the rights and cultural preservation of indigenous peoples. The Palestinians are not included in them, because they are not classified as an indigenous people.

  8. Here is the two state plan for Israel and Palestine. Palestine will be a puppet state to Israel, and nothing more. Last I checked, a puppet state is not a real two-state solution.

  9. Arie's Pragmatic Politics says:

    Given the "palestinians" refuse to this day to remove the "kill the criminal entity" from both their charters, keep the current two-state solution in place: Israel and the 'palestinian' state of jordan

  10. Harry Zhang says:

    Amen to this! The Israelis ARE native to the region! Zionism is homecoming, NOT colonialism!

  11. Debunking this article:

    1) The First Nations community has expressed solidarity with Palestinians for decades. To hand pick a no-name non-leader like Bellerose and pretend he represents First Nations in Canada is ridiculous. Idle No More, the largest First Nations activist group which has supporters all over the world has expressed solidarity with Palestinians on numerous occasions, most recently by protesting hand-in-hand with them in Jan. 2013

    2) To claim the Jews are the indigenous population of Palestine is outrageous. First, the Jews have never been one race so they can't constitute a single indigenous population. Rachel cannot claim that the Ethiopian, Arab, European, Indian and Chinese Jews are all the same people. Second, 80% of the world's Jews are Ashkenazi, meaning they originate not from the Middle East but Eastern Europe. And even if those Jews were originally from the ME (which they are not), THEY LEFT OVER 3,000 AGO and never tried or wanted to go back essentially until the 1940s. If you want proof of that, ask yourself why it is that nearly all the 2.2 million Jews who left Eastern Europe at the same time as Herzl was selling Zionism in the late 19th century chose to go to the US instead of Palestine if they were so yearning for Jerusalem.

    And besides, you can't claim something after 3,000 years! If that were true, then the Italians could pretty much claim all of Europe since they are original Romans!

    Third, there is no ethnic or genetic difference (as proven by the Israelis!) between Middle Eastern Jews and Palestinians. The Palestinians are the original Jews of Palestine that converted to Christianity and Islam over the centuries. They have been there as long or longer than the Jews have and they never went anywhere.

    3) As the author states, in recent history, the population of Palestine was Muslim by a vast majority. In fact, since the advent of Islam in about 600AD, the Jewish population in Palestine never reached past 6-8%. So how does the author figure that the tiny minority of Jews that were in Palestine from 150 years ago are indigenous but the vast majority of the Muslims and Christians there at the same time are not? How does that make any sense? These are the same people just different religion. All people in Palestine, regardless of religion, had always considered themselves Palestinians, that's the truth.

    4) EVEN IF everything in this article were true, WHO CARES? It doesn't really matter if the Palestinians are more or less indigenous than the Jews because the fact of the matter is, they have a right to return to their homeland. You can't show up after 3,000 years, kick out over 800,000 Palestinians, steal all of their property, shoot them when then they try to cross the border to reunite with their family or their land, and then pretend they didn't exist! I don't care who is indigenous and for how long, fact of the matter is in 1948, the Palestinians owned over 90% of the land in Palestine and they have the right to return to that land under International Law. If you don't like it, I don't care, that's the truth.

    My own family has a documented family tree in my village for over 1,300 years. We built the church in our village and had lived side by side peacefully with Jews , Muslims, Druze and Bedouin for over a millennia. Travellers to Palestine in the 19th century wrote about my family in their diaries. I am a PALESTINIAN and I am more indigenous to my homeland than the author of this article could ever dream to be.

  12. Response to Al Filistiniya below: 1) Bellerose is not the only Native American to express solidarity with the Jewish people and the Land of Israel. While some Native Americans have been misinformed about the conflict and supported the Palestinian cause as a result due to a Palestinian misinformation campaign that targets the Native American community, many Native Americans see through their propaganda. Feel free to check out an article that I wrote on the subject. http://unitedwithisrael.org/native-american-tribal-support-for-the-state-of-israel/

    2) Numerous genetic studies demonstrate the exact opposite of what you said. The Jewish people are indeed one people with more genetically in common with each other than the non-Jewish communities where they used to live. This means that a Morocaan Jew, for example, has more genetically in common with a Russian Jew than with an Arab. Furthermore, 50 percent of Israel's population consists of Mizrahi Jews who never left the Middle East region. These Mizrahi Jews lived in the Middle East thousands of years before Islam took over the region. They never left the region. Furthermore, I know of two Israeli Jews who can trace their family trees back to 1492, demonstrating a continuous presence in Israel since that period of time. While some Palestinians have been in the land longer, they are very much in the minority, since most Palestinians migrated to the land from surrounding Arab countries around the very time the Jews came. In addition, Jews have always lived on the land, while Muslims only made up a majority in the country during Mamluk times. Thus, since the Jews were the indigenous inhabitants and always had a communities within the country, and their ancestors lived there, they have more of claim than most Palestinians who migrated in the late Ottoman period and British Mandate times whose ancestors never lived there. The population of Arabs wasn't continuous. The Arabs who lived in Israel in the seventh century are not the same Arabs who lived there after the Crusades, when the population was eliminated. Secondly, it was 2,000 years ago that Jews made up the majority, not 3,000. Learn some history.

    3) Actually, the facts that I mentioned show that Jews have had a continuous presence on the land and that Arab Muslims were never the sole inhabitants. They weren't the single population, like the Native Americans were.

    4) The Ottomans owned the land, not the Palestinians. Israel bought tons of land from absentee Arab land-owners. The rest was achieved legally through the League of Nations mandate and other legal documents. So you can't claim that Palestinians owned the land, when there was never a Palestinian entity. Ottomans were not indigenous either, they were an empire. They had about as much of a claim to Israel as Rome has a claim to Ghaul.

  13. Response to Al Filistiniya below: 1) Bellerose is not the only Native American to express solidarity with the Jewish people and the Land of Israel. While some Native Americans have been misinformed about the conflict and supported the Palestinian cause as a result due to a Palestinian misinformation campaign that targets the Native American community, many Native Americans see through their propaganda. Feel free to check out an article that I wrote on the subject. http://unitedwithisrael.org/native-american-tribal-support-for-the-state-of-israel/

    2) Numerous genetic studies demonstrate the exact opposite of what you said. The Jewish people are indeed one people with more genetically in common with each other than the non-Jewish communities where they used to live. This means that a Morocaan Jew, for example, has more genetically in common with a Russian Jew than with an Arab. Furthermore, 50 percent of Israel's population consists of Mizrahi Jews who never left the Middle East region. These Mizrahi Jews lived in the Middle East thousands of years before Islam took over the region. They never left the region. Furthermore, I know of two Israeli Jews who can trace their family trees back to 1492, demonstrating a continuous presence in Israel since that period of time. While some Palestinians have been in the land longer, they are very much in the minority, since most Palestinians migrated to the land from surrounding Arab countries around the very time the Jews came. In addition, Jews have always lived on the land, while Muslims only made up a majority in the country during Mamluk times. Thus, since the Jews were the indigenous inhabitants and always had a communities within the country, and their ancestors lived there, they have more of claim than most Palestinians who migrated in the late Ottoman period and British Mandate times whose ancestors never lived there. The population of Arabs wasn't continuous. The Arabs who lived in Israel in the seventh century are not the same Arabs who lived there after the Crusades, when the population was eliminated. Secondly, it was 2,000 years ago that Jews made up the majority, not 3,000. Learn some history.

    3) Actually, the facts that I mentioned show that Jews have had a continuous presence on the land and that Arab Muslims were never the sole inhabitants. They weren't the single population, like the Native Americans were.

    4) The Ottomans owned the land, not the Palestinians. Israel bought tons of land from absentee Arab land-owners. The rest was achieved legally through the League of Nations mandate and other legal documents. So you can't claim that Palestinians owned the land, when there was never a Palestinian entity. Ottomans were not indigenous either, they were an empire. They had about as much of a claim to Israel as Rome has a claim to Ghaul.

  14. To better understand the various points of view in this debate, I suggest you read my "Peoples of the Earth; Ethnonationalism, Democracy and the Indigenous Challenge in 'Latin' America," particularly pages 69-84.

  15. alexa says:

    The Jews have been not only a national and religious group since the 2nd century BCE but also have common genetic links derived in the ancient Middle East despite their dispersion throughout the world, sophisticated genetic analysis based in New York has concluded.

    Saying that most of them are Ashkenazi means you believe they are khazares. A belief that many anti-Semite use.

    Jews were always living in the ME
    n 1211, the Jewish community in the country was strengthened by the arrival of a group headed by over 300 rabbis from France and England,
    n 1534, Spanish refugee Jacob Berab settled in Safed. He believed the time was ripe to reintroduce the old “semikah” (ordination) which would create for Jews worldwide a recognised central authority

    In around 1563, Joseph Nasi secured permission from Sultan Selim II to acquire Tiberias and seven surrounding villages to create a Jewish city-state.

    Just few examples.

    Jews were majority in Jerusalem since the middle of the 19th century.

    Most Palestinians immigrated to this area from Arab countries in the time of Ottoman and British occupation. They came here looking for work and better life conditions.
    Most of the lands in the time of the Mandate of Palestine were state land. Only a small amount belonged to private people.

  16. RABBI DR. BERNHARD ROSENBERG

    America Unite BOSTON BOMBING.

  17. Rachel,

    Look, you are living in a dream world. You are in love with the myth that all Jews are the descendants from 12 tribes from 2,000 years ago, never mixed with anyone and were living with a sense of loss, having no identity, culture or purpose until the establishment of Israel. Hence your completely unrealistic belief that the Jews are the only indigenous people in Palestine. And its ridiculous.

    You need to realize a few things:

    1) the idea that there was never any conversion within the Jewish faith is beyond wishful thinking. It's in fact absolutely impossible. Simple logic and a pair of eyes should tell you that the Jews from the Middle East, India, China and Eastern Europe are not the same race. Most Jews are in fact converts, from the race of their place of origin, that took on the religion over a period of 2,000 years. Judaism, like every other world religion, spread through conversion. If you don't believe me, well then, ask Professor Israel Bartal of Hebrew University, a prominent go-to guy on Israel’s history:

    "No ‘nationalist’ Jewish historian has ever tried to conceal the well-known fact that conversions to Judaism had a major impact on Jewish history and in the early Middle Ages. Although the myth of an exile from the Jewish homeland (Palestine) does exist in popular Israeli culture, it is negligible in serious Jewish historical discussions. Important groups in the Jewish national movement expressed reservations regarding this myth or denied it completely" (Haaretz, 2009)

    What blows my mind when you talk about the indigenous people of Palestine is I can prove my history in Palestine, yet you want to pretend I don't exist. I know for a fact that I am a Palestinian with roots in my village for over 1,300 years. I have my family tree, we built the church in the village with our names inscribed on its pillars, our homes have been on the same hill for centuries, there are streets named after my relatives, stories which all the villagers are familiar with. I have birth certificates going back centuries that say that my ancestors were born in PALESTINE. Please explain to me how you can compute that I am not indigenous — yet you, an (American?), somehow are indigenous to the land … based on … what exactly? Are you going on what the Bible says, which we know cannot be taken for fact? Where's your family tree? Where is your proof of a direct connection through your own family in Palestine over 2,000 years ago? I don't care if your Jewish, anyone can convert. How did you suddenly decide that you have more rights than me to the land in my village which has the blood, sweat tears and bones of my ancestors?

    You say you know two families with roots in Palestine? I believe you. My own family lived side by side peacefully with Jewish families in our village. But I know literally hundreds of Palestinian families with history in Palestine. You know, like the approximately 200 families that are the descendants of the original Ghassanid tribes (some of the first Christians in the region) that established the residential squares of Bethlehem (Najajreh, Tarajmeh, Anatreh, Qawawse, Hraizat, Fawagreh and Farahiyeh)? Ramallah was established by the Ghassanid tribe named Al-Haddadin in the mid 1500s. Other Christian tribes which settled in Ramallah are Jaghab, Al-Sharaqah, Al-Yousif, Al-Awwad, Al-Ibrahim, Al-Jiries, Al-Shaqrah and Al-Hasassnah

    Ever heard of the Khalidi family? They have roots in Jerusalem from the 7th century, had served as mayors and business owners and even have a library named after them in Jerusalem. What about the Quttainah family in Jerusalem who are the descendants of Mujir al-Din al-Ulaymi, the Palestinian historian who wrote “The Glorious History of Jerusalem and Hebron” in 1496 and is buried at the Mount of Olives? And the Farouki family, descendants of Umar ibn al-Khattāb, the second Caliph, with a history of over seven hundred years in Ramleh?

    The Nasrawii family is from Nazareth; the Nablusi family from Nablus, as are the Muslimani, Yaish, Shakshir and Dayri families. The Shakaa family has been making soap in Nablus for centuries, and they still do today. The Saffuri family is from Saffuriya, now named Tzippori. The Saffuris were forced out of their village in 1948 and fled to Nazareth, a section of which is now named after them (the Saffuri quarter of Nazareth). The Al-Dajani family established Bayt Dajan on the outskirts of Jaffa. They are mentioned in the old Testament.

    I could go on but there's no room here… you want to pretend that these people don't exist, as if for 2,000 years absolutely nothing happened in Palestine. No one lived there except for the Jews according to you and it's a joke.

    2) EVEN IF there was a group of Jews in Palestine all this time, which I totally believe is the case, so what? They were not the only people there and as you mentioned, they haven't been a majority for 2,000 years. Why is it that you want to pretend that the land is only for the Jews when we know that for at least the past 2,000 years, there have been mostly non-Jews there? Why are you so self-centered to think that you are more important than anyone else? The Palestinians built Palestine. Have you ever been to Israel? Take a look around at any old building and know that there is a 90% chance they were built by Palestinians, not Jews. The Palestinians built the wall around Jerusalem, the churches and mosques that are all over the country. Any stone house you see belonged to a Palestinian family – and if you cared to ask around, I GAURANTEE you that there is another Palestinian family nearby who can tell you exactly the family who built that home. I can do it for all of Haifa, I know which house belongs to which family because they have been there for centuries and guess what? They are not easily forgotten.

    3) At the end of the day, indigenous or not, it really doesn't matter. I don't care if on any piece of land across all of Palestine/Israel whether the people there got there 200 years ago or 2,000 years ago, you can't just show up and take their homes in the name of your religion. If you want to believe you are indigenous, then well, I guess all the Jews should leave America then no? Since it's not your land? How about we move the whole world around because most of everyone is not indigenous to the land they live on. The fact is that the Jews had no right to steal Palestine.

    Please don't get me wrong. All the above is not to say that I think Israel should disappear. So you want a Jewish state? Ok, I have no problem with that. After all, Israel already exists right? Did you forget that there is no reason to argue anymore? Israel is already there. And so what more do you want? To **** all over my history? Is that what would make you happy? To pretend that I don't exist? You want all of what is now Palestine too? When will you be satisfied Rachel, tell me.

  18. I have also heard Native Canadians support Palestinians. However, this shows how wrong the comparison is.

  19. I have also heard Native Canadians support Palestinians. However, this shows how wrong the comparison is.

  20. we will fight till the end , we will claim till we return I don't care if we and the native Americans are the same but what I know is they suffered like how we suffered am not brainwashed its you who are blind with history lies , peace my friend.

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