Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Inscription on Coptic church in Cairo

“This may end being a game of ‘chicken’ [to see] who withdraws his decision first,” Dr. Omar Ashour, a scholar at the Brookings Doha Center and director of the Middle East Politics Graduate Studies Program at the University of Exeter, told msnbc.com.

All Egyptians, including Christians, anticipate the power struggle, which Reuters labeled “a war of attrition,” to be far from over. More battles lie ahead, including the drafting of Egypt’s constitution, the right of which last month was stripped from the parliament in a decree that authorizes the military to appoint the body to write the document. In this confrontation for power, nothing less than the very ideals of Egypt’s revolution—mainly that a democratically elected government would replace the military—are at stake.

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Originally published by Gatestone Institute http://www.gatestoneinstitute.org

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