web analytics
September 3, 2015 / 19 Elul, 5775
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post


Anti-Semitic Incidents In Poland

         People are on edge when it comes to the topic of anti-Semitic occurrences in Poland. Some have even said that I see Poland through rose-colored glasses. In truth anti-Semitic incidents in Poland do exist, and denying it would be living in a dream world. But the fact is, they have become less frequent in the recent past.

 

         The Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage in Poland, which has jurisdiction over many Jewish sites throughout Poland, has just published a report of events that have been passed on to the police for further investigation. Though there are 14 events listed below, others took place outside the Foundation’s jurisdiction, and therefore are not listed. One such example is the recent anti-Semitic graffiti at the Ohel of Rebbe Elimelech of Lizhensk (Lejask).

 

Anti-Semitic Incidents In Poland


Reported By The Foundation

 

         1. Warsaw, January 22, 2002 – Propagating of anti-Semitic contents and calling for hatred towards Jewish people on the Internet website www.polonica.net. Investigation made by the Public Prosecutor’s Office was discontinued on September 20, 2007 as no perpetrators were identified.

 

         2. Swidnica, September 1, 2003 – Propagating of anti-Semitic contents on the website www.historianiebezpieczna.kgb.pl/syjon/klinika.html, established by Mariusz R. Investigation made by the Public Prosecutor’s Office was discontinued on June 28, 2007, as the case was not classified as an offense.

 

         3. Brzeziny, December 14, 2006 – Devastation of the Jewish cemetery: a commemorative plaque was damaged. Investigation made by the Public Prosecutor’s Office was discontinued on March 14, 2007 as no perpetrators were identified.

 

         4. Swidwin, February 26-28, 2007 – Devastation of the Jewish cemetery: a commemorative plaque and matzevot were damaged. Investigation made by the Public Prosecutor’s Office was discontinued on June 9, 2007 as no perpetrators were identified.

 

         5. Suwalki, March 2007 (exact date unknown) – Devastation of the Jewish cemetery: swastikas were painted on matzevot. Investigation made by the Public Prosecutor’s Office was discontinued on May 8, 2007 as no perpetrators were identified.

 

         6. Warsaw, March 19, 2007 – Anti-Semitic graffiti were painted on the monument of the Warsaw Ghetto Heroes. Investigation is being made by the District Police.

 

         7. Augustów, probably April 8, 2007 – Devastation of the Jewish cemetery: a commemorative plaque was damaged and matzevot were covered with swastikas. Investigation made by the Public Prosecutor’s Office was discontinued on September 20, 2007 as no perpetrators were identified.

 

         8. Krakow, April 14, 2007 – Anti-Semitic slogans were shouted and Fascist gestures made by the participants of the NOP (a neo-Nazi organization) demonstration. Investigation made by the Public Prosecutor’s Office was discontinued on November 26, 2007 as no perpetrators were identified and the case was not classified as an offense.

 

         9. Warsaw, May 18, 2007 – Participation of David Irving, author of works denying the Holocaust, in the 52nd International Book Fair. After the Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage in Poland and other institutions, filed a complaint to the organizer of the Fair, a meeting with Irving was cancelled and he was asked to leave the Fair.

 

         10. Tuliszków, probably June 22, 2007 – Devastation of the Jewish cemetery: a commemorative plaque was torn off from the wall and swastikas were painted on a matzevah. Investigation made by the Public Prosecutor’s Office.

 

         11. Bialystok, August 18, 2007 – Devastation of the Jewish cemetery: swastikas and anti-Semitic slogans were painted on the fence and on matzevot. Devastation of the monument of the Bialystok Ghetto Heroes: it was covered with paint and an obelisk was damaged.

 

         12. Bialystok, August 19, 2007 – Anti-Semitic symbols and slogans were painted on houses in Zamenhofa St. and Sienkiewicza St.

 

         13. Bialystok August 26, 2007 – Anti-Semitic symbols and slogans were painted on a building in Zamenhofa St., below the plaque commemorating Ludwik Zamenhof.

 

         A bill of indictment against three suspects was filed in the District Court. They were all members of an organized group called “The Fourth Edition.” They may be sentenced to five years in prison. The case was separated from another one, concerning 11 youths (the youngest are 15 years old); it was transferred to the Family and Youth Court.

 

         14. Suwalki October 25th-27, 2007 – Devastation of the Jewish cemetery: swastikas were painted on the facsimile of the Wailing Wall and on matzevot. Investigation made by the Public Prosecutor’s Office was discontinued on November 27, 2007 as no perpetrators were identified.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Anti-Semitic Incidents In Poland”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
PA Chairman Mahmoud Abbas, (R) seated with  PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat (L).
French Investigators Rule ‘No Evidence’ Yasser Arafat Murdered
Latest Sections Stories
West-Coast-logo

Though each member of Meira Academy’s 2015 graduating class was accepted to a university, all of the girls have chosen to spend a gap year in Israel to attend seminary before they head to college.

The two Torah giants spent hours discussing a variety of Torah topics, some of which went well beyond subjects normally dealt with in Lithuanian yeshivas.

Lunchbox Restaurant in Tel Aviv.

Bringing your own sandwich to a restaurant would appear as the height of chutzpah, but not any more—at least not at Lunchbox…

Last year, OneFamily published a cookbook in Hebrew featuring the bereaved mothers’ recipes.

How did an unresolved murder case turn into an accusation of ritual murder?

Excerpted from The Apple Cookbook (c) Olwen Woodier. Photography by (c) Leigh Beisch Photography with Food Stylist Robyn Valarik. Used with permission of Storey Publishing.

The flag had been taken down in the aftermath of the Charleston shooting and was now back and flying.

A light breakfast of coffee and danishes will be available during the program.

A variety of glatt kosher food will be available for purchase at Kosher Korner (near Section 1).

Jewish Press South Florida Editor Shelley Benveniste will deliver a talk.

Corey Brier, corresponding secretary of the organization, introduced the rabbi.

The magnificent 400-seat sanctuary with beautiful stained glass windows, a stunning carved glass Aron Kodesh, a ballroom, social hall, and beis medrash will accommodate the growing synagogue.

Even when our prayers are ignored and troubles confront us, Rabbi Shoff teaches that it is the same God who sent the difficulties as who answered our prayers before.

I’ve put together some of the most frequently asked questions regarding bullies, friendship and learning disabilities.

More Articles from Shmuel Ben Eliezer
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Lauder receiving a special album from Rabbi Maciej Pawlak, director of the Lauder-Morasha school in Warsaw.

In 1989 he hosted a dinner for 157 young Jews with the late Rabbi Chaskel Besser and the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation in Poland was born.

Part of the reconstructed Gwozdziec Synagogue.

The Polin Museum of the History of Polish Jews is designed to tell the whole thousand-year story of the Jews in Poland.

I REMEMBER WHEN I first started working at the Jewish Press 18 years ago, Arnie who was in charge of the newsroom, took me under his wing…

The official beginning of World War II was September 1, 1939. On that day German soldiers invaded Gdansk after bombarding the city with a military warship. As part of the Polish Government’s official series of events marking seven decades since the start of World War II, Poland’s Jewish community and the Jerusalem-based “Shavei Israel” organization held a special ceremony yesterday in the Gdansk synagogue to commemorate the outbreak of the war, which paved the way for the Holocaust.

The official beginning of World War II was September 1, 1939. On that day German soldiers invaded Gdansk after bombarding the city with a military warship. As part of the Polish Government’s official series of events marking seven decades since the start of World War II, Poland’s Jewish community and the Jerusalem-based “Shavei Israel” organization held a special ceremony yesterday in the Gdansk synagogue to commemorate the outbreak of the war, which paved the way for the Holocaust.

September 1, 1939 is the date on which Germany invaded Poland, starting WWII. While it should be said that the start of the war was not the start of the Shoah, which actually began with the rise of Nazism in 1933, it was a major milestone in the annals of the Holocaust. Within the first few days of the war, Germany had conquered and/or bombed much of Poland, including the capital, Warsaw.

September 1, 1939 is the date on which Germany invaded Poland, starting WWII. While it should be said that the start of the war was not the start of the Shoah, which actually began with the rise of Nazism in 1933, it was a major milestone in the annals of the Holocaust. Within the first few days of the war, Germany had conquered and/or bombed much of Poland, including the capital, Warsaw.

In September 1939 the Germans started establishing ghettos in the occupied territory of Poland. Ghettos played an important role in the Jewish extermination policy. They were filled with Polish and Western European Jewish deportees. The ghettos differed in times of existence, size, internal organization, and living conditions. The Germans called them ” death boxes” (Todeskiste). The city of Lodz belonged to the Wartheland District and the Germans changed its name into Litzmannstadt.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns/anti-semitic-incidents-in-poland/2008/03/26/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: