web analytics
July 3, 2015 / 16 Tammuz, 5775
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post


Exploring Jewish Roots In Poland

         Before my most recent trip to Poland I gave my readers a chance to hire me to find the town of their origin in Poland. I offered to visit the town and videotape and photograph anything that I would find, to give a feel of the way the town looks today, as well as look for any remnants of the former Jewish life of each location.


 


         I received many requests and traveled over most of Poland during my more-then-five weeks in the country. Over the next couple weeks I will be highlighting some of the places that I visited and will describe some of what I experienced.

 

         Once such adventure, for in most cases it really was an adventure, took me to the towns of Pyzdry and Miloslaw, west of Warsaw.

 

         To start off I went to various offices in Warsaw to find out where these towns are and what I might find there. I also gave the names to the archives in Warsaw to start the research process going. I found that the towns were located in the Poznan Province, and regional archives dating to before the Shoah, were also located in Poznan.

 

         I traveled to Poznan where I explored the town (more on Poznan in a later article) and in the morning found a driver to take me to Pyzdry.

 

         According to Alicja Kobus, president of the Poznan community, there was a Jewish gentleman, living in the town of Wrzesnia, who would be able to help me in Pzydry. Mr. Crestow Prondela is an older man, a survivor, and the only Jew in the town, who speaks no English, but taught himself Hebrew.

 

         He told me that he had never been to Pzydry or Miloslaw but was glad to be of whatever assistance he could.

 

         We traveled to Pzydry and started looking for the synagogue and the cemetery. The Police Station/City Hall was closed and we had to ask many people before we got directions to the cemetery. We were told that there is nothing to see there, as there were no tombstones or even a gate at the location, and we probably wouldn’t even find it, as it was hidden in a forest. The synagogue, we also learnt, had been torn down after it was deemed unsafe.

 

         After a search of the dirt roads behind the town we came to a place where the cemetery was supposed to be. We got out of the car at a farmhouse to ask directions but nobody was home. My friend and I started looking around and, after half-an-hour of running around the woods, found a memorial pillar made of bricks and a few fragments of tombstones. A bronze plaque in Polish said that this was the location of the Jewish cemetery of Pzydry.

 

 


(l-r) Mr. Crestow Prondela with a local resident recalling her memories of the Jews of Pzydry.

 

 

         An elderly local woman approached us. She had heard in town that there were Jews looking for the cemetery and this 92-year-old woman came running. It seems we were the first Jews in Pzydry for a long time.

 

         She remembered a number of Jewish friends from before the war and said “They were all killed.”

 

         She also told us that the forest now encroached the actual cemetery, as well as the nearby farmhouse, whose owner was not at home. She explained that after the war a German owned the property and took care of the cemetery, but after he died, a Pole took over the farm and is not as caring or respectful of the cemetery.

 

         We saw that there seemed to be a ditch dug into the sandy soil and also a pile of small stones that did not seem to be from the area. I supposed that these were parts of tombstones that had been broken up, scattered around, but later, gathered into one place by the farmer. I could not find any inscriptions or even carving on the stones so I was not able to confirm my suspicions.

 

         I said some Tehillim for the long deceased, took videos and pictures, and we continued on our journey.

 

         The local museum was closed, I was told that even though the web site talks about Jewish relics at the museum, including some tombstones, they had all been removed and there was nothing left to see. They also informed me that any pertinent records of the Jewish population of Pzydry were in the regional archives in Poznan and the National Archives in Warsaw.

 

         From there we went to Miloslaw, a town about 15 miles away, and could not even find the cemetery. First we were told it was at one location, then at another, and found that what we were being guided to was a Christian cemetery. The “Synagogue” was also a church, turned into a closed museum.

 

         The best information we were able to get was from kids and their teachers at the local school. They spoke some English and were very knowledgeable and friendly. It was a pity that there was nothing positive with which they could help us.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Exploring Jewish Roots In Poland”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
United Nations Building, New York City
The United Nations Has Israel’s Blood On Its Hands
Latest Sections Stories
Rav S. R. Hirsch

Last month we outlined how a few years after Judah Touro’s death a public movement was inaugurated by the citizens of New Orleans to erect a monument to his memory, and that opposition to this tribute came from a number of rabbis throughout the country who claimed that Judaism forbade the erection of any graven […]

Singer-Saul-Jay-logo-NEW

Marceau suggested a dark reason for his wordless art: “The people who came back from the [concentration] camps were never able to talk about it…. My name is Mangel. I am Jewish. Perhaps that, unconsciously, contributed towards my choice of silence.”

Anna Henriques, who hopes to one day head back to Jamaica, says, “Rabbi Raskin must be willing to respect what exists in Jamaica. The way to the future is to gently bring in the traditions of the past and at the same time embrace the idiosyncrasies of the Jamaican people.”

The Silver Platter has it all: gorgeous photography, oodles of useful tips and, more importantly, incredible recipes that you will find yourself making again and again.

It may be that seeking to connect with the past is rooted in the impermanence and impersonality of modern life.

It is very hard to build a healthy marriage when you do not have good role models.

My best book is one that hasn’t been published yet.

We tend to justify and idealize this division with pride attributing these tendencies as demonstrating a higher level of kedushah.

Everyone in the kehilla can get involved, she added, and mothers can network with each other.

On her first ever trip to Israel last week, popular radio talk-show personality and clinical psychologist Dr. Joy Browne, whose spirited broadcasts regularly attract millions of listeners across North America, paid a visit to OneFamily headquarters in Jerusalem in order to learn more about the physical and emotional challenges faced by victims of terror in […]

With the famous Touro Synagogue, a variety of mansions, each with its own distinct personality, as well as the beautiful coast, Rhode Island makes for an excellent vacation spot.

To avoid all this waste and unnecessary anxiety, let’s break the task down step by step and tackle each one at a time.

More Articles from Shmuel Ben Eliezer
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Lauder receiving a special album from Rabbi Maciej Pawlak, director of the Lauder-Morasha school in Warsaw.

In 1989 he hosted a dinner for 157 young Jews with the late Rabbi Chaskel Besser and the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation in Poland was born.

Part of the reconstructed Gwozdziec Synagogue.

The Polin Museum of the History of Polish Jews is designed to tell the whole thousand-year story of the Jews in Poland.

I REMEMBER WHEN I first started working at the Jewish Press 18 years ago, Arnie who was in charge of the newsroom, took me under his wing…

The official beginning of World War II was September 1, 1939. On that day German soldiers invaded Gdansk after bombarding the city with a military warship. As part of the Polish Government’s official series of events marking seven decades since the start of World War II, Poland’s Jewish community and the Jerusalem-based “Shavei Israel” organization held a special ceremony yesterday in the Gdansk synagogue to commemorate the outbreak of the war, which paved the way for the Holocaust.

The official beginning of World War II was September 1, 1939. On that day German soldiers invaded Gdansk after bombarding the city with a military warship. As part of the Polish Government’s official series of events marking seven decades since the start of World War II, Poland’s Jewish community and the Jerusalem-based “Shavei Israel” organization held a special ceremony yesterday in the Gdansk synagogue to commemorate the outbreak of the war, which paved the way for the Holocaust.

September 1, 1939 is the date on which Germany invaded Poland, starting WWII. While it should be said that the start of the war was not the start of the Shoah, which actually began with the rise of Nazism in 1933, it was a major milestone in the annals of the Holocaust. Within the first few days of the war, Germany had conquered and/or bombed much of Poland, including the capital, Warsaw.

September 1, 1939 is the date on which Germany invaded Poland, starting WWII. While it should be said that the start of the war was not the start of the Shoah, which actually began with the rise of Nazism in 1933, it was a major milestone in the annals of the Holocaust. Within the first few days of the war, Germany had conquered and/or bombed much of Poland, including the capital, Warsaw.

In September 1939 the Germans started establishing ghettos in the occupied territory of Poland. Ghettos played an important role in the Jewish extermination policy. They were filled with Polish and Western European Jewish deportees. The ghettos differed in times of existence, size, internal organization, and living conditions. The Germans called them ” death boxes” (Todeskiste). The city of Lodz belonged to the Wartheland District and the Germans changed its name into Litzmannstadt.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns/exploring-jewish-roots-in-poland/2007/11/21/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: