web analytics
December 19, 2014 / 27 Kislev, 5775
 
At a Glance
InDepth
Sponsored Post
8000 meals Celebrate Eight Days of Chanukah – With 8,000 Free Meals Daily to Israel’s Poor

Join Meir Panim’s campaign to “light up” Chanukah for families in need.



Saying No To ‘Palestine’


As the Palestinians press forward in international forums with their plans for statehood, a growing chorus of countries has expressed support for the move.

Defying history, logic and reason, much of the world has made clear that it would like to see a state of Palestine arise alongside Israel.

And yet, there is one obvious but critical question that many supporters of such a proposal have all but overlooked: if the Palestinians were to get their wish, what kind of state would it be?

Obviously, we do not know for certain what the answer is, and I pray that we never have the opportunity to find out. After all, the creation of a Palestinian state would imperil Israel, reduce the country to indefensible borders and betray our people’s 2,000-year old dream of returning to its land.

Nonetheless, it is worth pondering the question for a moment or two, if only to underline still further the need to say no to the creation of a state called Palestine.

To begin with, there is no reason to believe a Palestinian state would be peaceful, tolerant or democratic. Just the opposite. From the statements made by Palestinian leaders, it is clear they have little patience for the niceties of Western liberal society.

Take, for example, the question of whether Jews or Israelis would be allowed to live in “Palestine.” More than 1.3 million Arabs reside in Israel with full and equal rights, so it would only seem fair that Jews should be accorded the same treatment in a Palestinian state.

But the Palestinians themselves don’t seem to feel that way. Last month, the Palestinian ambassador to the United States, Maen Areikat, told reporters that any future Palestinian state would have to be free of Jews. “I think it would be in the best interest of the two peoples to be separated,” he said (USA Today, September 14).

And if you think Areikat’s statement perhaps does not reflect the official position, think again: Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas has said the same thing.

Last December, in remarks to journalists in Ramallah, Abbas declared, “We have frankly said, and always will say: If there is an independent Palestinian state with Jerusalem as its capital, we won’t agree to the presence of one Israeli in it when a Palestinian state is established, it would have no Israeli presence in it” (The Jerusalem Post, December 25, 2010).

Does it really make sense to create a state that would hang a large “No Jews Allowed” sign at its entrance?

But Jews aren’t the only ones who would not be welcome in such a state.

Christians too would likely not feel at home. Ever since the establishment of the Palestinian Authority in 1994, they have faced increasing persecution at the hands of Muslim extremists, leading large numbers of Christians to emigrate from the Palestinian-controlled areas.

A report on the Christian Broadcasting Network a few years ago described the case of Anwar al-Aqwal, a Palestinian father of eight who converted from Islam to Christianity. As a result, he was subjected to repeated arrests and torture by Palestinian police, and was later gunned down in his home by unknown assailants.

In addition to being chauvinistic and xenophobic, a Palestinian state would also be hostile to Israel.

According to the Jerusalem Post (July 15), a survey conducted by the Palestinian Center for Public Opinion found that two-thirds of Palestinians believe their “real goal should be to start with a two-state solution but then move to it all being one Palestinian state.”

Sixty-two percent of Palestinian respondents said they support the kidnapping of Israeli soldiers and holding them hostage, while 53 percent were in favor of teaching songs in Palestinian schools that promote hatred of Jews.

To any fair-minded observer, it should be clear that neither the Palestinians nor their leaders are infused with noble ideas about freedom and understanding.

Instead, Palestinian society is drenched in hatred of Israel and Jews, and the Palestinian leadership has repeatedly refused to accept Israel as a Jewish state.

So if it were to be created, “Palestine” would not be a bastion of liberty and acceptance, as its supporters might wish us to believe.

All available evidence indicates that a Palestinian state would simply be yet another retrograde anti-Western outpost of hostility and repression. And if there is one thing the Middle East most certainly does not need, it is another thuggish and hateful regime.

Michael Freund is a former adviser to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. He is the founder and chairman of Shavei Israel (www.shavei.org), a Jerusalem-based organization which assists the Bnei Menashe and other “lost Jews” to return to the Jewish people.

About the Author: Michael Freund is the Founder and Chairman of Shavei Israel. He writes a syndicated column and feature stories for the Jerusalem Post, Israel’s leading English-language daily, and he previously served as Deputy Director of Communications & Policy Planning in the Prime Minister’s Office under Benjamin Netanyahu. A native of New York, he holds an MBA in Finance from Columbia University and a BA from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Saying No To ‘Palestine’”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Moshe Kachlon (L) and Avigdor Liberman (R)
Liberman’s Secret Plan to be Crowned Prime Minister
Latest Indepth Stories
The annual  Chabad menorah lighting in Sydney has been called off this year because of the murders in the Lindt cafe.

The decision to not publicly light the Menorah in Sydney, epitomizes the eternal dilemma of Judaism and Jews in the Diaspora.

Greiff-112814-Men

Am Yisrael is one family, filled with excruciating pain&sorrow for losing the 4 kedoshim of Har Nof

Two dreidels from the author’s extensive collection.

What is its message of the dreidel?” The complexity and hidden nature of history and miracles.

Keeping-Jerusalem

Police play down Arab terrorism as mere “violence” until the truth can no longer be hidden.

The 7 branches of the menorah represent the 7 pillars of secular wisdom, knowledge, and science.

Obama obtained NO verifiable commitments from Cuba it would desist from acts prejudicial to the US

No one would deny that the program subjected detainees to less than pleasant treatment, but the salient point is, for what purpose?

For the past six years President Obama has consistently deplored all Palestinian efforts to end-run negotiations in search of a UN-imposed agreement on Israel.

It’s not an admiration. It is simply a kind of journalist fascination. It stands out, it’s different from more traditional Orthodoxy.

For Am Yisrael, the sun’s movements are subservient to the purpose of our existence.

Israelis now know Arab terrorism isn’t caused by Israeli occupation but by ending Israeli occupation

Anti-Semitism is a social toxin that destroys the things that people most cherish and enjoy.

Amb. Cooper highlighted the impact of the Chanukah/Maccabee spirit on America’s Founding Fathers

Zealousness has its place and time in Judaism; Thank G-d for heroic actions of the Maccabees!

More Articles from Michael Freund
Michael Freund

Speaking in his native German, Schulz used the opportunity to blast Israel.

German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier

German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeieris is browbeating Israel in public.

Ever since he vanished, the American government had repeatedly asserted that Levinson was a private businessman — his own safety.

For the second time in the past three months, Israel on Sunday declared its intention to build over 1,000 housing units in areas beyond the 1967 lines.

Nearly seven decades since the end of World War II, Poland is once again turning on its Jews.

In a stunning move last week, the lower house of the Polish parliament rejected a bill that would have restored the legality of shechita, or kosher slaughter, by a vote of 222 to 178.

Last Friday, the Western Wall underwent an unwelcome transformation from sacred site to media circus as the group known as the Women of the Wall sought to hold a decidedly non-traditional prayer service.

The state of Israel this week turned 65, defying history and the odds to celebrate its continued existence in a very dangerous part of the world.

As I write these words, a Jewish toddler injured in a Palestinian terror attack is lying in a hospital bed struggling for her life.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns/fundamentally-freund/saying-no-to-palestine-2/2011/10/18/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: