web analytics
November 26, 2014 / 4 Kislev, 5775
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post
IDC Herzliya Campus A Day on Campus

To mark IDC Herzliya’s 20th anniversary, we spent a day following Prof. Uriel Reichman, IDC’s founder and president, and Jonathan Davis, VP for External Relations, around its delightful campus.



Groundbreaking For Museum Of Jewish History Of Polish Jews

      It has been more than 10 years since its conception, but finally the long-awaited groundbreaking ceremony for the Museum of Jewish History of Polish Jews has been set for June 26, 2007.

 

      The museum will be located in the park that now stands in front of the monument to the Warsaw Ghetto in the heart of Warsaw where the heaviest fighting of the Ghetto uprising took place.

 

      The museum, as I have reported in the past, will be a multimedia, documentary and educational center aiming to spotlight and preserve the memory of the 1,000-year- long rich culture and civilization of Jews living in Poland.

 

      The project initiated by the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw, when finished, will be unique among Jewish museums, not only in Europe but the world over. Using the latest in technological advances the museum will tell the story of the first Jews to wander into the area known as Poland through the Middle Ages, the birth of Chassidism, the Haskalah, the heady days between the World Wars, the darkness of the Shoah, the much misunderstood period of post-Holocaust Poland, and finally the rebirth of the Jewish community in present-day Poland.

 

 

 

Meeting of the advisory committee of Jewish historians discussing specifics of the museum exhibits.

 

 

      While most Jewish Museums are visited by Jews who are already familiar with the subject, the Museum of Jewish History of Polish Jews will have a strong emphasis of educating non-Jews. Poles will have a chance to discover the truth about the Jewish nation, whom they mostly know as a people that once lived among them.

 

      They will learn about the Jewish way of life and what it meant to be a Jew in Poland. They will discover the vast contributions of the Jewish people to Polish culture.

 

      For the Jewish visitor, they will see how life in Poland existed for 1,000 years. Sometimes good, sometimes bad, but that Poland was the place Judaism was able to develop as nowhere else.

 

      The great rabbis of old lived in Krakow, i.e., the Rema who codified religious law for the Ashkenazic Jews, whose teachings we still learn and follow today. The Chassidic movement started by Rabbi Yisrael Baal Shem Tov and continued by his disciples throughout Poland, including the dynasties of Gur, Bobov, Alexander, Sanz and hundreds of others that now exist in the U.S. and Israel. All had their roots in Polish soil.

 

      Visitors to the museum will encounter displays designed to engage them emotionally as well as intellectually, give them a sense of actually “being there” in the cities, towns and villages of the culturally diverse Polish Republic. The exhibit will demonstrably disprove the notion that the history of the Jews in Poland is a closed book.

 

      The very structure of the museum is designed to welcome the visitor, relieving the anxiety that many have when approaching the subject of Jewish heritage in Poland.


      Alongside the permanent exhibition hall the museum will also consist of a temporary area, for exhibits of a timely nature, a library, and education center with a computer bank, auditorium, bookshop and restaurant.

 

* * * * * *

 


      Last week there was a letter to the editor regarding this column from a Mr. George Kruszewski. In his letter from Adelaide, Australia, he notes that Po-lin means refuge. He is referring to the legend that when the Jews were wandering through Europe they came to an area and heard a voice from heaven saying “Po Lin,” Hebrew for, “Here you should rest,” and they lived there for a thousand years.

 

      Mr. Kruszewski asks that people remember the complete 1,000-year history of the Jews in Poland and not Just the Holocaust.


     

        Regular readers of my column know that I try to emphasis that long relationship of the Jews and Poland. I try to bring out the great-unknown stories of Jewish Polish relationships such as the Jewish King of Poland Saul Wahl.

 

      Poles who have been recognized by Yad Vashem in Israel as being Righteous Among The Nations for having saved Jews during the war are especially close to my heart. I have interviewed and written about Jan Karski, z”l, Wladyslaw Bartoszeski and Irena Sendler as well as others in the past. I welcome hearing about Mr. Kruszewski’s father whom he said has rescued numerous Jews by helping them across the border. I will do some research on him and dedicate a column to him in the near future. More than 100 of my columns can be found on the Internet on the Jewish Press web site: jewishpress.com under Columns/Polin.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Groundbreaking For Museum Of Jewish History Of Polish Jews”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
F-16 fighter jet.
ISIS ‘Prince’ of Iraq’s Anbar Province Killed
Latest Sections Stories
Schonfeld-logo1

This core idea of memory is very difficult to fully comprehend; however, it is essential.

Respler-112114

Sometimes the most powerful countermove one can make when a person is screaming is to calmly say that her behavior is not helpful and then continue interacting with the rest of the family while ignoring the enraged person.

LBJ-112114

“Two nations are in your womb, and two peoples shall divide within you.”

Divorce from a vindictive, cruel spouse can be a lifelong nightmare when there are offspring.

There were many French Jews who jumped at the chance to shed their ancient identity and assimilate.

As Rabbi Shemtov stood on the stage and looked out at the attendees, he told them that “Rather than take photos with your cellphones, take a mental photo and keep this Shabbat in your mind and take it with you throughout your life.”

Yeshiva v’Kollel Bais Moshe Chaim will be holding a grand celebration on the occasion of the institution’s 40th anniversary on Sunday evening, December 7. Alumni, students, friends and faculty of the yeshiva, also known as Talmudic University of Florida, will celebrate the achievement and vision of its founders and the spiritual guidance of its educational […]

The yeshiva night accommodates all levels of Jewish education.

Recently, Fort Lauderdale has been the focus of international news, and it has not been about the wonderful weather.

Rabbi Sacks held the position of chief rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth for 22 years until September 2013.

The event included a dvar Torah by student Pesach Bixon, an overview of courses, information about student life and a student panel that answered frequently asked questions from a student perspective.

It is difficult to write about such a holy person, for I fear I will not accurately portray his greatness…

“Grandpa,” I wondered, as the swing began to slow down, “why are there numbers on your arm?”

So the real question is, “How can we, as hosts, make sure our guest beds are comfortable?” Because your guests will never say anything.

More Articles from Shmuel Ben Eliezer
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Lauder receiving a special album from Rabbi Maciej Pawlak, director of the Lauder-Morasha school in Warsaw.

In 1989 he hosted a dinner for 157 young Jews with the late Rabbi Chaskel Besser and the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation in Poland was born.

Part of the reconstructed Gwozdziec Synagogue.

The Polin Museum of the History of Polish Jews is designed to tell the whole thousand-year story of the Jews in Poland.

I REMEMBER WHEN I first started working at the Jewish Press 18 years ago, Arnie who was in charge of the newsroom, took me under his wing…

The official beginning of World War II was September 1, 1939. On that day German soldiers invaded Gdansk after bombarding the city with a military warship. As part of the Polish Government’s official series of events marking seven decades since the start of World War II, Poland’s Jewish community and the Jerusalem-based “Shavei Israel” organization held a special ceremony yesterday in the Gdansk synagogue to commemorate the outbreak of the war, which paved the way for the Holocaust.

The official beginning of World War II was September 1, 1939. On that day German soldiers invaded Gdansk after bombarding the city with a military warship. As part of the Polish Government’s official series of events marking seven decades since the start of World War II, Poland’s Jewish community and the Jerusalem-based “Shavei Israel” organization held a special ceremony yesterday in the Gdansk synagogue to commemorate the outbreak of the war, which paved the way for the Holocaust.

September 1, 1939 is the date on which Germany invaded Poland, starting WWII. While it should be said that the start of the war was not the start of the Shoah, which actually began with the rise of Nazism in 1933, it was a major milestone in the annals of the Holocaust. Within the first few days of the war, Germany had conquered and/or bombed much of Poland, including the capital, Warsaw.

September 1, 1939 is the date on which Germany invaded Poland, starting WWII. While it should be said that the start of the war was not the start of the Shoah, which actually began with the rise of Nazism in 1933, it was a major milestone in the annals of the Holocaust. Within the first few days of the war, Germany had conquered and/or bombed much of Poland, including the capital, Warsaw.

In September 1939 the Germans started establishing ghettos in the occupied territory of Poland. Ghettos played an important role in the Jewish extermination policy. They were filled with Polish and Western European Jewish deportees. The ghettos differed in times of existence, size, internal organization, and living conditions. The Germans called them ” death boxes” (Todeskiste). The city of Lodz belonged to the Wartheland District and the Germans changed its name into Litzmannstadt.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns/groundbreaking-for-museum-of-jewish-history-of-polish-jews/2007/05/09/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: