web analytics
April 18, 2014 / 18 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance
InDepth
Sponsored Post
Spa 1.2 Combining Modern Living in Traditional Jerusalem

A unique and prestigious residential project in now being built in Mekor Haim Street in Jerusalem.



Home » InDepth » Columns »

The Sanhedrin Reestablished (Part III)

Share Button

The new Sanhedrin first met in Tiberius because it was foretold that it would be renewed there and would be relocated to Jerusalem. That is exactly what has been done. At first, the names of many of those ordained were withheld, to avoid strong public pressure on them to renounce their membership. Today, more and more names have been made public as understanding of the importance of the Sanhedrin increases. The rabbis believe that they are performing an important mitzva rather than searching for fame or honor. The attitude of some of their colleagues is proof that honor is not the goal.


There is also a concern that the increasingly “non-Jewish” and “anti-Jewish” rulings handed down by the Israeli Supreme Court underscore the immediate need for an alternative legal system based on Torah and Talmud. While, at least in one instance, an Israeli court deferred to a ruling of the new Sanhedrin, the long-term effect of a religious Sanhedrin is yet to be seen.


The meeting I attended began with a prayer and a short reading of the Rambam. The discussions were serious, and I was impressed by their level and the level of several of the speakers. The Sanhedrin secretary, Rabbi Dov Stein, read the agenda for the meeting – a discussion both of “hot topics” and of philosophical questions. One of the hot topics concerned “collateral deaths in defensive response” and whether the Sanhedrin should publish a ruling on this issue. The Arabs have been firing Kassam rockets into Israel, trying to hit Jewish population centers, and the Israeli army has fired back into unpopulated areas but has not retaliated against Arab population centers for fear of the collateral deaths of civilians.


The question was asked, “Should Israel strive to stop further shelling of Israeli areas by making the price of shelling very high for the Arabs, or should Israel not retaliate, and be more concerned about civilian Arab casualties, even at the expense of Jewish lives?” The majority opinion seemed to be that “there are no innocents in a war zone” and that Israel should take any action necessary to prevent the murder of Jews. It was noted that since a large majority of the Palestinian Arabs had voted for Hamas, thereby agreeing to the Hamas goals of murdering Jews and destroying Israel, the civilian population had a status of “rodef” (oppressor or persecutor). Many disagreed, however, on whether or not the Sanhedrin should state a halachic ruling and publicize it.


The Sanhedrin exists within a non-religious country and world, and there is great concern about the negative impact of any ruling of the Sanhedrin on Israeli and world opinion. The majority agreed on the halachic aspect but did not agree on the impact of a statement that would be interpreted as “political” and might result in the Sanhedrin being socially marginalized. Would the publicity of a ruling be worthwhile? How would the Jewish and non-Jewish world view a call for “retaliation”? Most agreed that no matter what the decision, it must be placed in the context of a recommendation to avoid the world branding the Sanhedrin as having primitive and weird behavior. Others were concerned that Israel was “sitting with folded hands in embarrassed silence by not responding to the murderous rockets falling near our population centers.”


I found the level of the discussions quite stimulating. I did not fully understand the fear of public criticism and opinion, but realized that it is part of the growing pains of a religious institution in our “civilized” world. The consensus seems to have been that instead of rulings, recommendations should be made until the Sanhedrin gained greater public recognition.


The new Sanhedrin will, G-d willingly, grow and prosper. Eventually, additional prominent Torah scholars will flock to it and the members will gain more confidence. It was inspiring to see that there are many rabbis concerned enough to give of their time to revive this important institution in Torah life.


More information may be found at www.thesanhedrin.org


Share Button

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

No Responses to “The Sanhedrin Reestablished (Part III)”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Flyers ordered Jews to appear at a designated location in Ukraine, in Sept., 1941. The next day, the Jews lined up at the Babi Yar Ravine.
‘Jews Must Register’ Flyer in Ukraine an Echo of Babi Yar
Latest Indepth Stories
matza

If itis a mitzva to eat matza all Pesach, then why is there no berakha attached to it?

Masked Palestinian Authority Arabs hurl blocks at Israel Police during and after "worship" at Temple Mount mosque. (archive photo)

When we are united with unconditional love, no stone will be raised against us by our enemies.

Haredim riot after draft-dodger is arrested.

The reporter simply reports the news, but it is greater to be inspired to better the situation.

Bitton-041814

The Big Bang theory marked the scientific community’s first sense of the universe having a beginning.

Freeing convicted murderers returns the status of Jewish existence to something less than sanctified.

“The bigger they are the harder they fall” describes what God had in mind for Olmert.

We, soldiers of the IDF, who stand guard over the people and the land, fulfill the hopes of the millions of Jewish people across the generations who sought freedom.

How much is the human mind able to grasp of the Divine?

Jews have brought the baggage of the galut (exile) mentality to the modern state of Israel.

The Haggadah is an instruction manual on how to survive as strangers in strange lands.

It’s finally happened. New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan reported on her blog that “many readers…wrote to object to an [April 2] article…on the breakdown in peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians,” claiming “[they] found the headline misleading and the article itself lacking in context.” Ms. Sullivan provided one such letter, quoted the […]

Nor did it seem relevant that according to widely circulated media reports, Rev. Sharpton was caught on an FBI surveillance video discussing possible drug sales with an FBI agent.

Jewish soldiers in the Polish forces often encountered anti-Semitic prejudice.

When the state was established, gedolim went to Ben-Gurion and asked him not to draft women and, later, yeshiva bachrim.

More Articles from Dov Gilor
Gilor-Dov-NEW

Spies who caused American deaths and worked for enemy states received lighter sentences than Pollard.

Gilor-Dov-NEW

The cleansing of Europe of its non-Muslim population will be accomplished in another two or three generations.

The Drama Mamas are not an ordinary theater troupe. “When we audition actresses,” says Elisheva, who also serves as the show’s director, “we like to explain to them that the main qualification is that you can honestly say, I have never been on a stage before, but I have always wanted to be an actress!”

It really is time for painful sacrifices for peace. No one wants his children, grandchildren and great grandchildren to suffer the pangs of war and strife. It is time to end the strife and make peace in the Middle East.

Israel is a country that understands security concerns. Many civil rights have been sacrificed in the name of security and Israelis are used to being checked every time they enter a shopping center, a large store or any public building. Americans recently learned that they, too, are subject to many checks on their most private activities.

The Israeli Parliament is usually controlled by a coalition of different political parties because no one party receives enough votes to have a majority. Unlike in the U.S., where there are two major political parties and one of the two political parties commands a majority of the seats in the Senate and/or in the House, in Israel the government is composed of many, many small political parties, each pushing its own agenda.

The title above is a lovely thought. Unfortunately, there are too many times when Israeli Orthodox Jews behave in very divisive ways. I have mentioned, on occasion, that it would most probably bring the Mashiach if Orthodox Jews in Israel were ever to unite. We are so divided politically that Sephardi Jews will not support Ashkenazi Jews and Ultra-Orthodox Jews will not work with the Modern Orthodox or with the Zionist Orthodox.

Israel recently commemorated Memorial Day in memory of its fallen heroes. Sadness permeates the day as we remember the sons, daughters and parents who have sacrificed their lives so that the Jewish Nation can continue to exist.

    Latest Poll

    Now that Kerry's "Peace Talks" are apparently over, are you...?







    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns/the-sanhedrin-reestablished-part-iii/2006/06/07/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: