web analytics
August 27, 2014 / 1 Elul, 5774
At a Glance
InDepth
Sponsored Post
Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat (L) visits the JewishPress.com booth at The Event. And the Winners of the JewishPress.com Raffle Are…

Congratulations to all the winners of the JewishPress.com raffle at The Event



Home » InDepth » Monitor »

Business As Usual


Media-Monitor-logo

It was too good to last. The news media, which by and large performed admirably for about a month after the events of Sept. 11, are showing clear signs of reverting to old habits. The sour cynicism directed at American officials, the credulous reporting of enemy claims, the shallowness and sensationalism that once were the province of cheesy local stations but have long since become a staple of the network news departments – all of these are slowly coming out of hiding and reasserting themselves as the driving forces of American journalism.

For those readers not inclined to take the Monitor’s word on this, let’s hear from a couple of industry insiders. New York Times photographer Vincent Laforet, stationed in Pakistan, recently delivered a remarkable warning to unsuspecting Americans.

“Speaking of the media,” Laforet said, “I have but one thing to tell you. Don’t trust anything you see on TV and be wary of some of the things you read. I witnessed how sensationalistic the media can be during the Florida recount. It’s even worse here. We covered a pro-Taliban demonstration last week attended by maybe 5,000 protestors. CNN stated there were 50,000. The BBC estimated 40,000.”

Veteran ABC correspondent Jim Wooten, discussing the ease with which Taliban spokesmen disseminate their propaganda in the Western media, made this observation on the Oct. 25 broadcast of “World News Tonight”:

“The Taliban says 200 are dead. Days later, when reporters visit the site, they find nowhere near that number of casualties, but by then the story is already out: the Taliban version. It happens nearly every day. In the Afghan embassy in Islamabad, the Taliban ambassador presents some murky account of American atrocities or Taliban success. ‘This time,’ he says, -the U.S. is using chemical weapons and targeting civilians, and a thousand have already been killed.’ Often no pictures, no proof.”

Not that every ABC reporter shares Wooten’s scruples. Just two days before Wooten went public with his frustration, his colleague Dan Harris conducted an instructive interview with Abdul Jabar, a Pakistani doctor who treated several civilians, including a young boy, who said they’d been injured during an American attack. Is it the Monitor’s imagination, or is Harris actively soliciting anti-American remarks?

Harris: How do you feel when you see these kids?

Jabar: I feel very sad.

Harris: Angry?

Jabar: Yes, my sympathies are with the Afghanis.

Harris: Angry at the United States?

Jabar: Yes.

Harris then signed off with the following commercial for the Taliban: “Everyone we spoke with at this tiny hospital said the ongoing raids have made the population here and across the border angry at the U.S. and supportive of the Taliban.”

This is news? Just try to imagine a journalist during World War II finding himself behind enemy lines during the Allies’ bombardment of Germany and filing a similar story from a German hospital: “Everyone we spoke with said the ongoing raids have made the population here angry at the Allies and supportive of the Nazis.”

On the home front, meanwhile, the “Today” show’s Ann Curry was worried about the New York City public school system’s new policy of having students recite the Pledge of Allegiance. “The American Civil Liberties Union is very concerned about your resolution,” Curry remarked to the head of the school board. “They are saying basically that those young people who choose not to participate could be targeted for harassment.

“And the New York City school system has a lot of people, a lot of students and perhaps even teachers who are not American citizens, isn’t that correct?…. Perhaps the school systems across the country really should be thinking about renewing a lesson about tolerance?”

Jason Maoz can be reached at jmaoz@jewishpress.com

About the Author: Jason Maoz is the Senior Editor of The Jewish Press.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Business As Usual”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
The three salesmen -Netanyahu, Ya'alon and Gantz
Netanyahu Tries to Sell Bill of Goods that Israel Won Goals in the War
Latest Indepth Stories

Reportedly, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates have formed a bloc that seeks to counter Islamist influence in the Middle East.

One wonders how the IDF could be expected to so quickly determine the facts.

While there is no formula that will work for everyone, there are some strategies that if followed carefully and consistently can help our children – and us – gain the most from the upcoming school year.

We risk our lives to help those who do what they can to kill to our people .

Twain grasped amazingly well the pulse of the Jewish people.

The entertainment industry appears divided about the conflict between Israel and Hamas.

Israelis in Gaza border communities need to get out; who will help them?

The contrast between the mentality of Israel and the mentality of Hamas was never so loudly expressed as when the Arab killers became heroes and the Jewish killers became prisoners.

There is a threat today representing a new category of missionary:They call themselves “Hayovel.”

Just as we would never grant legitimacy to ISIS, we should not grant legitimacy to Hamas.

Is Woodstock still leading the world to destruction?

Wye would be seen to have set the groundwork for the creation of a Palestinian state

Blaming Israel for the violence in Gaza, he ends up justifying Hamas’s terrorism.

In the Thirties it was common for anti-Semites to call on Jews to “go to Palestine!”

More Articles from Jason Maoz
Charles Krauthammer

Wye would be seen to have set the groundwork for the creation of a Palestinian state

Presidential-Seal-062014

These are not necessarily the best all-around biographies or studies of the individual presidents listed (though some rank right up there), but the strongest in terms of exploring presidential attitudes and policies toward Israel.

The Clintonan “engagement” liberals remember with such fondness did nothing but embolden Arafat and Hamas and Hizbullah as they witnessed Israel’s only real ally elevate process ahead of policy.

What really makes one wonder about the affinity felt by certain Jews for Grant was the welcome mat he put out for some of the country’s most pernicious anti-Semites.

With 2013 marking half a century since Kennedy’s fateful limousine ride in Dallas, the current revels are exceeding the revisionist frenzies of years past, with a seemingly endless parade of books, articles and television specials designed to assure us that, despite everything that has come to light about him since his death, JFK was a great president, or at least a very good president who would have been great had his life not been so cruelly cut short.

As someone who for the past fifteen years has been writing a column that largely focuses on the news media, I’ve read what is no doubt an altogether unhealthy number of books on the subject. Most of them were instantly forgettable while some created a brief buzz but failed to pass the test of time. And then there were those select few that merited a permanent spot on the bookshelf.

George W. Bush has been getting some positive media coverage lately, with recent polls showing him at least as popular as his successor, Barack Obama, and a big new book about the Bush presidency by New York Times chief White House correspondent Peter Baker (Days of Fire, Doubleday) portraying Bush as a much more hands-on chief executive than his detractors ever imagined.

Readers who’ve stuck with the Monitor over the years will forgive this rerun of sorts, but as we approach the fortieth anniversary of the Yom Kippur War – and with the stench of presidential indecisiveness hanging so heavily over Washington these days – it seemed only appropriate to revisit Richard Nixon’s role in enabling Israel to recover from the staggering setbacks it suffered in the first week of fighting.

    Latest Poll

    Do you think the FAA ban on US flights to Israel is political?






    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/media-monitor/media-monitor-139/2001/12/05/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: