web analytics
April 16, 2014 / 16 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance
InDepth
Sponsored Post
Spa 1.2 Combining Modern Living in Traditional Jerusalem

A unique and prestigious residential project in now being built in Mekor Haim Street in Jerusalem.



Home » InDepth » Monitor »

The Palestinians’ Gal At The New York Times


Media-Monitor-logo

Share Button
Yes, another Monitor on The New York Times – and if you don’t understand why the Times warrants constant scrutiny, you probably shouldn?t be reading this column to begin with.An editorial in last week’s edition of The Jewish Press did a fine job of parsing a recent article by Deborah Sontag, the Times’s Jerusalem bureau chief (and, as regular visitors to this space know, the Monitor’s hands-down choice for worst foreign correspondent on a major American newspaper). This week Sontag’s work is back where it belongs, a rancid specimen of skewed reporting firmly nailed down to the Monitor’s dissecting table.

On February 14, this is how Sontag opened her front-page piece on the Arab bus driver who the day before rammed his vehicle into a bus stop, killing eight Israelis:

“After years of shuttling Gazan laborers into Israel without incident, a Palestinian bus driver who passed a strict Israeli security clearance just two weeks ago veered wildly off course today with deadly consequences.”

Read that sentence again, slowly this time, and make note of how Sontag takes pains to paint the driver in the most benign of lights, almost as if she were an attorney offering a defense brief. Before she even deigns to mention the number of dead and injured, she tells us of her client’s – oops, the driver’s – exemplary past performance and his clean bill of health from Israeli security.

And the manner in which Sontag conveyed the cause of the deadly incident – the driver “veered wildly off course” – makes it appear as if the poor soul might simply have lost control of the steering wheel. Yasir Arafat, whose initial reaction to the incident was to shrug it off as just another “road accident,” couldn’t have put it better.

Now, contrast Sontag’s unprofessional drivel with the lead paragraphs turned in by real reporters. Vivienne Walt of The Boston Globe (a newspaper owned by The New York Times Company) wrote, “A Palestinian driver slammed a bus into a crowd of young Israeli soldiers outside Tel Aviv yesterday, killing eight people. It was the deadliest attack on Israelis since 1997.”

Here was the Washington Post’s Lee Hockstader: “A Palestinian driver steered into a throng of young Israeli soldiers and civilians at a crowded bus stop near Tel Aviv this morning, killing eight of them, injuring nearly 20 and transforming rush hour into a tableau of carnage.”

Tracy Wilkinson of the Los Angeles Times filed this online dispatch the day after the attack: “Authorities tightened Israel’s blockade of Palestinian territories Wednesday and vowed tough punishment after a Palestinian driver mowed through a crowd of Israeli soldiers and commuters at a bus stop, killing eight people and injuring more than 20.”

Phil Reeves, writing in Britain’s Independent, described “a Palestinian bus driver who saw no need for bombs or bullets but used his own vehicle as his weapon, crashing it into a crowd waiting at a bus stop and popular hitchhiking post.”

Even Suzanne Goldenberg, the correspondent for London’s left-wing Guardian, reported the incident for what it was: “Morning rush hour brought raw horror to the heart of Israel yesterday when a Palestinian driver turned his bus into a killing machine, mowing down eight commuters at a crowded stop and injuring 20 others.”

The contrast could not be more telling: Walt, Hockstader, Wilkinson, Goldenberg and Reeves offered their readers reporting that was concise and straight to the point, without any preliminary apologetics on behalf of the Arab driver, while Sontag put her pro-Palestinian spin to work immediately in her opening paragraph.

But then, not much better can be expected from a woman who last month labeled incoming Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon an “unreconstructed Zionist” – a phrase that seems to suggest that unadulterated Zionism is something enlightened individuals are expected to disassociate themselves from, or at the very least grow out of. You know, enlightened individuals like the ones at The New York Times.

Jason Maoz can be reached at jmaoz@jewishpress.com
Share Button

About the Author: Jason Maoz is the Senior Editor of The Jewish Press.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

No Responses to “The Palestinians’ Gal At The New York Times”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Israeli soldiers closed off the area near where a terror attack occurred  near Hevron on Passover eve, in search of the terrorists.
Netanyahu: PA Incitement Caused Pre-Passover Terror Attack
Latest Indepth Stories
Lebovic-041814

How much is the human mind able to grasp of the Divine?

Benveniste-041814

Jews have brought the baggage of the galut (exile) mentality to the modern state of Israel.

Dann-041814

The Haggadah is an instruction manual on how to survive as strangers in strange lands.

It’s finally happened. New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan reported on her blog that “many readers…wrote to object to an [April 2] article…on the breakdown in peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians,” claiming “[they] found the headline misleading and the article itself lacking in context.” Ms. Sullivan provided one such letter, quoted the […]

Nor did it seem relevant that according to widely circulated media reports, Rev. Sharpton was caught on an FBI surveillance video discussing possible drug sales with an FBI agent.

Jewish soldiers in the Polish forces often encountered anti-Semitic prejudice.

When the state was established, gedolim went to Ben-Gurion and asked him not to draft women and, later, yeshiva bachrim.

Perhaps worse than all the above is the acute lack of unity among Jews

At our seder we emulate the way it was celebrated in Temple times, as if the Temple still stood.

Not one world leader holds Abbas accountable for his part in the breakdown of negotiations.

The 1948 re-establishment of Jewish sovereignty was a modern day Exodus and Parting of the Sea.

Spies who caused American deaths and worked for enemy states received lighter sentences than Pollard.

Christie’s “good friend” is an Imam who supports murderers of Jews and defames Israel and Christians.

One grey night it happened, Bibi caved no more
& Poof that Foggy Bottomer, he vanished from our sight

More Articles from Jason Maoz
Bob Grant

What really makes one wonder about the affinity felt by certain Jews for Grant was the welcome mat he put out for some of the country’s most pernicious anti-Semites.

Camelot-112213

With 2013 marking half a century since Kennedy’s fateful limousine ride in Dallas, the current revels are exceeding the revisionist frenzies of years past, with a seemingly endless parade of books, articles and television specials designed to assure us that, despite everything that has come to light about him since his death, JFK was a great president, or at least a very good president who would have been great had his life not been so cruelly cut short.

As someone who for the past fifteen years has been writing a column that largely focuses on the news media, I’ve read what is no doubt an altogether unhealthy number of books on the subject. Most of them were instantly forgettable while some created a brief buzz but failed to pass the test of time. And then there were those select few that merited a permanent spot on the bookshelf.

George W. Bush has been getting some positive media coverage lately, with recent polls showing him at least as popular as his successor, Barack Obama, and a big new book about the Bush presidency by New York Times chief White House correspondent Peter Baker (Days of Fire, Doubleday) portraying Bush as a much more hands-on chief executive than his detractors ever imagined.

Readers who’ve stuck with the Monitor over the years will forgive this rerun of sorts, but as we approach the fortieth anniversary of the Yom Kippur War – and with the stench of presidential indecisiveness hanging so heavily over Washington these days – it seemed only appropriate to revisit Richard Nixon’s role in enabling Israel to recover from the staggering setbacks it suffered in the first week of fighting.

Shakespeare had it right. The evil that men do indeed lives after them. Case in point: Nahum Goldmann, who served in a variety of Jewish and Zionist organizational leadership posts from the 1920s through the 1970s.

Oscar “Ossie” Schectman, who scored the first basket in the history of the league that evolved into the National Basketball Association, died last week at age 94.

It’s certainly been a while, hasn’t it? And yet it seems like the conversation was never really interrupted, as I’ve enjoyed, in the three and a half months since this column last appeared, many an interesting exchange, via e-mail and phone, with some very intelligent readers.

    Latest Poll

    Now that Kerry's "Peace Talks" are apparently over, are you...?







    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/media-monitor/media-monitor-14/2001/10/31/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: