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A Jewish Joker: From The Catskills To Gotham City


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The release of the new Batman movie, “The Dark Knight,” will inevitably be overshadowed by the untimely death of one of its stars, Health Ledger, who played the Joker. The talented young actor (who actually lived a few blocks from me) had devoted himself to creating an original, multifaceted portrayal of the iconic character, arguably the most compelling villain in the Batman canon.

The distinctive look and feel of this latest film was inspired by Frank Miller’s revolutionary graphic novels of the 1980’s, which unveiled a more complex and cynical Batman character than the caped crusader who debuted in the pages of DC’s Detective Comics in 1939.

Batman was the brainchild of Bob Kane and Bill Finger, two young Jewish bruisers who first crossed paths at DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx during the Great Depression.

Back then, in the wake of Superman’s spectacular success, comic book publishers were desperately searching for an equally profitable counterpart. So the DeWitt Dynamic Duo forged a strange yet oddly appealing character: millionaire playboy Bruce Wayne, who fights criminals in fictional Gotham City while wearing, of all things, a bat costume.

In his autobiography, Kane recalled his tough childhood in the Bronx, where the streets “were melting pots composed of different ethnic groups and often one nationality would be pitted against another. In order to survive, if one were a loner like myself, he would have to join his neighborhood gang for protection.”

Bruce Wayne is a loner, too, who through sheer hard work becomes a master thinker as well as fighter.

One by one, Batman’s colorful foes debuted: Catwoman, Two-Face, the Penguin, the Riddler and, most famously, the Joker. Fans owe the Joker’s existence to a chance encounter in the famed Catskills, a popular resort area and proving ground for the nation’s Jewish stand-up comedians.

“I was taking a respite from my drawing board during the summer at a hotel in the Catskill mountains (probably Grossinger’s), when I met seventeen-year-old Jerry Robinson,” Kane wrote.

The Jewish journalism student – and future creator of the Joker – was innocently pacing the tennis court when Kane noticed the young man’s impressive hand-painted jacket and offered him a chance to join his artistic team.

“I have often wondered what I’d be doing if I hadn’t been there on the tennis court that day,” Robinson later commented.

Often barred from joining restricted country clubs or staying at mainstream hotels, American Jews created their own, like the one where Kane met Robinson. There were so many of these resorts in upstate New York in the 1940’s that the area soon became known as the Borscht Belt.

These hotels and clubs gave generations of Jewish performers an opportunity to develop what would become a distinctive performing style. Take one self-deprecating, slightly desperate persona in a cheap tux, add a hostile, rapid fire delivery that belies that nebbish-y exterior, and you’ve got the classic Borscht Belt comic, a figure who gives the phrase “passive aggressive” a new meaning.

So perhaps it’s no coincidence that Kane and Robinson invented a character called the Joker.

The Joker clearly claims the mantle of Gotham City’s greatest criminal mastermind. The character’s original and currently dominant image is that of a sadistic yet intelligent serial killer with a deranged sense of humor. This interpretation was briefly but memorably interrupted when the campy Batman series became a mid-1960’s TV hit. That particular Joker, portrayed by the veteran actor Cesar Romero, was a toned down and tamed version of his former self, an eccentric but essentially harmless prankster and unsuccessful thief.

These respective Jokers represented the spirits of their times: the hardened, cruel Joker fit in during the Great Depression and our present day, while the softer, campy Joker personified the colorful and carefree sixties.

Jack Nicholson’s unforgettable tour de force in Tim Burton’s 1989 film “Batman” blended both Jokers together. Ledger’s portrayal, however, is meant to be far less appealing than Nicholson’s leering charismatic anti-hero. Hiding behind smeared clown makeup are horrible scars hinting at this latest Joker’s tragic, painful past.

“Some men aren’t looking for anything logical,” Alfred the butler (played here by Michel Caine) tells Bruce Wayne, who’s trying to decipher the Joker’s motives. “Some men just want to watch the world burn.”

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About the Author: Rabbi Simcha Weinstein, an internationally known best-selling author whose first book, "Up, Up and Oy Vey!" received the Benjamin Franklin Award, has been profiled in leading publications including The New York Times, The Miami Herald and The London Guardian. He was recently voted New York’s Hippest Rabbi by PBS Channel 13. He chairs the Religious Affairs Committee at Pratt Institute. His forthcoming book is “The Case for Children: Why Parenthood Makes Your World Better.”


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The release of the new Batman movie, “The Dark Knight,” will inevitably be overshadowed by the untimely death of one of its stars, Health Ledger, who played the Joker. The talented young actor (who actually lived a few blocks from me) had devoted himself to creating an original, multifaceted portrayal of the iconic character, arguably the most compelling villain in the Batman canon.

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