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September 3, 2015 / 19 Elul, 5775
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Eating Disorders Can Strike Anyone. Now What Do We About It?


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My own experience is testament to the fact that recovery is possible. I see my struggle as a crucial chapter in my life. Now I know it is my mission to help others who are suffering. In addition to speaking publicly about awareness, I run a support group in New York City for Orthodox young women in recovery and am building a website as a means of support for families in the Jewish community who have a loved one suffering from an eating disorder – as well as many other projects, all under the umbrella name of Tikvah V’Chizuk (Hope and Strength.)

I am doing all I can to make a difference. How about you?

About the Author: Temimah Zucker, a recent graduate of Queens College, is dedicated to helping others who suffer from eating disorders and has just been appointed student liaison for the International Association for Eating Disorder Professionals (New York chapter). She resides in Teaneck, New Jersey, and can be contacted at informationTVC@gmail.com. For more information about “Hungry to be Heard,” contact Frank Buchweitz (OU director of community services) at 845-290-0124 or frank@ou.org.


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10 Responses to “Eating Disorders Can Strike Anyone. Now What Do We About It?”

  1. Beautiful Temimah. You should be very proud of yourself, your recovery, your commitment to making a difference, and your writing!

  2. Eating Disorders in the Jewish community.

  3. Eating Disorders in the Jewish community.

  4. Eating Disorders in the Jewish community.

  5. Thanks for pointing out that eating disorders are NOT solely based on abuse or sports. They are biologically based coping skills. You turned to food to help you get through and cope with the loss and recent changes in your life. Many people fall through the cracks because they feel they don't fit the profile or stereotype for having an eating disorder so they fail to seek help. Thanks for sharing your story and your views!

  6. thanks for sharing your story. Food is so much a part of our culture and religious observations. Unfortunately eating disorders are too. My guess is that we have the highest percentage of any other race or religion to have eating disorders. We are so small in numbers yet my personal experience and work as an advocate I've come in contact with so many Jewish women and teens. We need to keep talking about this to our rabbis, youth groups, Hadassah, etc. I'm glad you're speaking up too. You and anyone else are welcome to follow my page and send me a friend request to "ANAD Lori Licker". Hope you had a happy Purim too. It's nice to enjoy the Hamentaschen :)

  7. Robert Steinberg says:

    The Beacon Mag just did an entire issue on eating disorders in the Orthodox community… http://thebeaconmag.com/2013/02/letters-to-the-editor/letter-from-the-editor/

  8. Masha Kishkina says:

    go temimah! amazing!

  9. Linda Heiser says:

    כל הכבוד. It took much strength for you to write this article and great insight. As a dietitian, I have seen many pass through the door at the psychiatric hospital I work in. I am glad that you are doing this great מצוה. Keep on going

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More Articles from Temimah Zucker
Zucker-030113

When people learn I suffered from an eating disorder they often are shocked for two reasons: How could such a vibrant, friendly, nice Jewish girl have had an eating disorder? And if I did, how am I able to talk about it so casually?

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/eating-disorders-can-strike-anyone-now-what-do-we-about-it/2013/02/27/

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