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November 29, 2015 / 17 Kislev, 5776
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Handwriting Analysis Has Jewish Roots, Says Therapist

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“On some level, [Hashem] inscribes his soul in what he writes and gives us; we’re made in his image, we too inscribe something essentially soulful, true about ourselves in our handwriting. Look again and again and learn more about the richness of who we really are.”

Poizner also sees parallels between the basic principles of graphology and the ten Sefirot described in mystical teachings. Learning about this, she says she was “blown away… finding the principles that the graphologist uses to interpret handwriting… seemingly embedded in, or derived from, the Sefirot… There is an intrinsic Jewish sensibility about how a graphologist looks [at handwriting], and all these ancient principles shine through, taking us back to the teachings of the Sefer Yetzira.”

Today, Poizner sees her mission as one of spreading the word, letting the general public and practitioners alike know that graphology is more than just hocus-pocus and that, both an art and a science, it is a serious tool for harnessing ancient wisdom towards modern self-realization.

About the Author: Jennifer MacLeod is a regular freelancer for the Canadian Jewish News, in addition to publishing on Aish.com, Jewish Action, Jewish Homemaker, New York Jewish Week, and Horizons Magazine. She blogs at Adventures in AliyahLand

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3 Responses to “Handwriting Analysis Has Jewish Roots, Says Therapist”

  1. Ben Eliezer says:

    Nice. In the essay below, the writer brings some examples of handwriting analysis of Jewish leaders:

  2. Ben Eliezer says:

    And here’s the full thesis on the Baal HaTanya’s handwriting analysis (in the original Hebrew; I can’t locate an English rendition):

  3. I thought handwriting analysis was used for detective work, but never thought of it for psychological work. I know very little about the Hebrew language though, so I find it very interesting that each character is symbolic. This gives the language an added level of depth which could be used for any number of things from hidden metaphors or riddles within riddles. Very cool. Hebrew poets probably operate on so many planes partly because of this, and simply knowing Hebrew probably makes a person better able to see things from multiple angles.

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