web analytics
August 20, 2014 / 24 Av, 5774
Israel at War: Operation Protective Edge
 
 
At a Glance
InDepth
Sponsored Post
Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat (L) visits the JewishPress.com booth at The Event. And the Winners of the JewishPress.com Raffle Are…

Congratulations to all the winners of the JewishPress.com raffle at The Event



Home » InDepth » Op-Eds »

Leopard Or Lamb?


The leopard isn’t the largest of the big cats. It’s not feared as a king of beasts. It’s not the fastest, like the cheetah. Rather, the leopard is persistent. A solitary hunter, its sharp vision enables it to see what others can’t. It dwells alone, stalking its prey in the darkness, able to kill animals much larger than itself. It often hauls its prey up a tree, to protect it from jackals and other scavengers.

The leopard is a resilient, adaptable hunter. This is reflected by the huge area through which it is dispersed. The people who share its territory know and respect its intelligence and strength.

Our Sages of blessed memory describe the leopard as “az.” In Mishna 5:23 of Avot, Yehuda Ben Taima advises us to be “az kenamayr, bold as a leopard, light as an eagle, swift as a deer, and strong as a lion to carry out the will of your Father in Heaven” (ArtScroll translation).

Elsewhere, “az,” or rather its derivative, “oz,” is translated as “might.” In Psalm 29 we are told “Hashem oz le-amo yitain” – “Hashem will give might to His people; Hashem will bless His people with peace” (ArtScroll translation).

What is az-oz? What leopard-like quality are we supposed to have, according to Yehuda Ben Taima? In another Mishna (5:24) he says the “az-panim,” the az-faced people, are destined for gehennim. In the Yehi Ratzon, recited after morning brachas, “az” is translated as “brazen” and we ask to be protected from such people.

We’re supposed to be “az,” but if we understand and do it wrongly, we’ve got a problem.

Let’s look back to the leopard for help.

King Nimrod was a great-grandson of Noah. He was the first person to start a war, the first described by the Torah as “mighty.” He subdued a leopard, which then accompanied him on his hunts. According to some, the word “Nimrod” is Babylonian for “leopard-tamer.” The leopard is thus the animal of the primordial man of war. It’s no coincidence that an important military tank was named for it.

The namayr is also seen as part of the oppression of the Jewish people. Rashi says the leopard, the third creature in Daniel’s vision (7:6), represents the evil kingdom of Antiochus, whose decrees were “spotted.”

The most famous leopard in Tanach is in the messianic vision of Isaiah 11:6, where the predator lies down with a young goat. A popular story tells of the zookeeper who wanted to display this scene for his guests. A visitor, amazed at seeing the predator and prey peacefully together, asked the zookeeper how he did it. “As long as I get a supply of kid goats, we’re fine.”

R. Gershon Winkler, author of Soul Of The Matter, says the leopard symbolizes stalking and patience, leading to sudden transformation. Its power is in its sudden appearance, its element of surprise, symbolic of redemption.

Putting all of these together, we have solitude, persistence, dispersion, resilience, patience, strength, intelligence, boldness, war, oppression, spottiness, surprise, redemption. We have the story of the Jewish People.

We are widely dispersed, we’re intelligent and strong. We persist despite the world’s attempts to be rid of us. When we create a life for ourselves, we have to metaphorically climb a tree to keep scavengers from taking what we have gained through our “az.” Certainly our accomplishments are disproportionate to our small numbers. Our “az” has also been brazen, leading toward darkness. Jewish intellectuals are in the forefront of a wide array of anti-Torah movements.

A simple example of the dual nature of “az” is the story of the greenhouses of Gaza, a brilliant agricultural triumph. The Jews who moved to a bleak desert had “az” to do the will of Hashem. Through persistence and intelligence, they created a resource the whole world could admire and benefit from.

What was the “az” of the Israeli government that expelled Jews from Gush Katif? Was it a bold or brazen act that ripped the greenhouses out of the hands of their creators, handing them to destructive scavengers? Perhaps we can say that the decrees of the Israeli government were “spotted.” With hindsight, we see that the expulsion brought Israel no friends, no respect, no tactical advantage.

In 1948, 1967, and even 1973, Israel’s military prowess seemed invincible. Many Jews felt that their survival in the midst of hundreds of millions of hostile Muslims was due to their own might. This brazen sense of power has since been severely fractured. Israel’s attempts to be the peaceful lamb in its relations with its neighbors have only resulted in reinforcing their desire to devour us.

The government of 1967 wanted to befriend the Arabs, so it left the Temple Mount, which we had just recaptured, in Arab hands. Now our enemies stone us from its heights, and bristle at our presence. Instead of appreciating the unilateral “disengagements” from Lebanon and Gaza, they send bombs. Israel’s apologies for bombing Kana and a UN outpost were accepted as proofs of guilt.

In the recent Lebanon war, Israel came home without defeating Hizbullah and without rescuing its kidnapped soldiers. There is a feeling of despair in the land, a lamenting of the failure of the leaders, of the army, of the national will. “All your enemies have opened their mouths wide against you; they hissed and gnashed their teeth [and] said, “We have engulfed [her]!” (Eichah 2:16, Judaica Press translation.)

We have tried many paths toward peace, only to find that they actually lead to destruction. Where can we turn for comfort, as Islamic fascism flexes its muscles? Psalm 29 gives us the answer: “Hashem oz le-amo yitain, Hashem yevaraich et amo bashalom”: “Hashem will give “oz” to His people; Hashem will bless His people with peace.” Yehuda Ben Taima, in the Mishna in Avot, is telling us something simple: grab hold of the “az” that Hashem has provided for us.

The key to our might, the basis for our persistence, the essence of our success lies in doing the will of our Father in Heaven. If we follow the four animals in the Mishna in Avot, then, like a leopard, sudden transformation and redemption will come upon us. Let the people of Israel be “az kenamayr” to serve God, to take the “az” He provides. Let the nation of Israel be bold, fearless and persistent in its actions. That way, we’ll truly merit Hashem’s blessing of peace.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Leopard Or Lamb?”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
ZIM ship near Oakland, Ca port.
ZIM Piraeus Successfully Unloads, Moves On to Next Port of Call #BlockTheBoat = #EpicFail
Latest Indepth Stories
Sgt. Sean Carmeli, ZT"L

The free-spirted lifestyle didn’t hold your interest; the needs of your people did.

And why would the U.S. align itself on these issues with Turkey and Qatar, longtime advocates of Hamas’s interests?

Several years ago the city concluded that the metzitzah b’peh procedure created unacceptable risks for newborns in terms of the transmission of neo-natal herpes through contact with a mohel carrying the herpes virus.

The world wars caused unimaginable anguish for the Jews but God also scripted a great glory for our people.

Judging by history, every time Hamas rebuilds their infrastructure, they are stronger than before.

His father asked him to read Psalms from the Book of Tehilim every day.

(Reposted with permission from author’s website) Moderate truth-teller Daniel Pipes (Dream) has further moderated his stance on Islam by actually entertaining the idea of “Moderate Islamism”, with Andrew C. McCarthy- whom I’ve debated about this- giving it some credence. We’ve gone from Naming the Enemy -Nazism, Communism- to Renaming the Enemy – “Islamic Totalitarianism”, “Radical Islam”, “Islamism”, […]

Maimonides: “Your 1 mitzva may tip the scales and bring redemption to the entire world and creation”

Jerusalem has been aware of the importance of China to its growth and security.

In other words, how by any rational playbook can one even begin to explain anti-Semitism?

Israel has nine Iron Domes, but you Mr. Hannity are the tenth.

Entire movements within “orthodoxy” propagate a Judaism of outlandish folklore and Jewish mysticism

The Rebbetzin began campaigning to increase public awareness of the importance of saying Amen.

Obama is transparent, if you read his oracular signs with the right key.

Everything I imbibe is with my inimitable fervor for being Jewish.

More Articles from Nathan Elberg

The leopard isn’t the largest of the big cats. It’s not feared as a king of beasts. It’s not the fastest, like the cheetah. Rather, the leopard is persistent. A solitary hunter, its sharp vision enables it to see what others can’t. It dwells alone, stalking its prey in the darkness, able to kill animals much larger than itself. It often hauls its prey up a tree, to protect it from jackals and other scavengers.

    Latest Poll

    Do you think the FAA ban on US flights to Israel is political?






    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/leopard-or-lamb/2006/11/22/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: