web analytics
October 25, 2014 / 1 Heshvan, 5775
At a Glance
InDepth
Sponsored Post
Meir Panim with Soldiers 5774 Roundup: Year of Relief and Service for Israel’s Needy

Meir Panim implements programs that serve Israel’s neediest populations with respect and dignity. Meir Panim also coordinated care packages for families in the South during the Gaza War.



Home » InDepth » Op-Eds »

New Draft Law a Gift of Hope to Impoverished Haredim and to Israel

This law not so much about getting Haredim into the army in the near future, as it is about immediately permitting Haredim into the legal workforce, thus breaking the cycle of poverty.

The latest incarnation of the Haredi Draft Law, aka “The Perry Law,” is an excellent piece of legislation.

The Haredi community suffers from serious problems, which are affecting the rest of the country as well.

Haredi towns and neighborhoods are among the poorest in Israel.

The cycle of poverty in which Haredim are stuck is due in part to the way governments have dealt with the draft issue in the past (no army service—no work permit), but, just as significantly, due of the way the political leaders (“askanim”) of the Haredi community have created a social structure that locks people into the cycle of poverty, thus also guaranteeing their reliance on those same leaders for education, social acceptance, and money.

Israel’s society also suffers from Haredi poverty, because when such a large segment of the population relies on welfare payments, the effect on the economy is devastating.

The new Haredi draft law has just passed its first reading, and will now undergo review in a special committee chaired by Jewish Home’s MK Ayelet Shaked, before it is sent back for a second and third round in the Knesset.

This law is not so much about getting Haredim into the army in the near future, as it is about immediately permitting Haredim into the legal workforce, thus breaking the cycle of poverty.

The new law divides Haredi society into three age groups:

If passed, the law will immediate allow Haredim ages 22 and up to enter the workforce if they wish, and never have to worry about being drafted again. They will receive a permanent exemption. They can also sit and learn forever, if they so choose.

Next, the law will allow Haredim ages 18-22 to defer their draft until they reach age 24, and then, at age 24, they may decide if they want to serve in the army, do national service, go to work, or stay in kollel and learn forever. In other words, to this age group the law guarantees temporary exemptions until they may receive a permanent exemption. But, once again, they would be able to legally join the workforce in 4 to 6 years.

The third age group are Haredim who will turn 18 in the year 2017.

Out of this group, 1,800 will receive exemptions to sit and learn Torah, for the first time effectively sanctioning Torah study in the Jewish State as the full equivalent of military service.

The fate of rest of those who turn 18 in 2017 will depend in some way on what today’s 18-22 age group does over the next 4 years.

The government intends to set a draft quota of 5,200 Haredim out of the approximately 8,000 who will reach 18 in 2017. Out of that quota, 3,000 will enlist in the IDF, 2,200 will do National Service—most likely in their own communities. The remaining 2,800 will receive permanent exemptions.

But, if the full 5,200 quota isn’t met, then the envisioned 2,800 exemptions will be automatically reduced to 1,800.

Give and take.

Incidentally, last year some 2,200 Haredim were drafted. Out of that group, 1,300 enlisted in the IDF and 900 did national service.

This year, the total number of enlisting Haredim is expected to reach 3,300. Not so far from the envisioned quota ( which could change following the committee review and the Knesset debate).

Indeed, Haredi youths are already at close to two-thirds of the draft quota of 4 years from now, and the sky hasn’t fallen.

This isn’t a one-way street as the IDF will gain as well. We think merely adding a large group of soldiers who are mature, disciplined, who don’t curse, and who keep the Mitzvot would go a long way to improving our army—but the much more important result of the law should be felt immediately, with Haredim who did not serve in the army legally taking on jobs to feed their families, with honor.

We happen to believe that, just as Haredi young men will surely make for a better, more civilized and more Jewish army, so will mass entry into the workforce have a similar positive influence on Israeli society.

About the Author: Stephen's company, WebAds, builds and manages online newspapers and websites to high volume readership and profitability.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

13 Responses to “New Draft Law a Gift of Hope to Impoverished Haredim and to Israel”

  1. Instead of using the Hareidim as a object of controversy, they will improve and enhance Tsahal. For example they may resist putting photos of barely clothed soldiers on social media. The new draft law will be a good thing.

  2. Steve Bell says:

    Sounds well thought and reason… may it lead to productive results and a happier healthier society and cultural life all around…

  3. The cycle of poverty could equally well be broken if there were no law prohibiting people that were not in the army from getting a job. What's most bothersome is that American Frum Jews to a great extent are trying to judge the entirely different Israeli Chareidi society on the basis of how American Judaism developed. It's a whole different world, a world that stems from the old yishuv that predated the Jewish state.

  4. David Zigun says:

    Sounds pretty fair to me. It will need some working to help preserve Chareidi sensibilities but THIS makes sense to me in finding a middle ground.

  5. Ruth Hirt says:

    Are they not to be devoted in the study and service in the Sanctuary and to the people?

  6. Ruth Hirt says:

    … to the observance of the Torah … ?

  7. Anonymous says:

    You seem to now it better than everyone else. Lapid sayes we have to get the out (I believe him). Banett says They have to defend the borders.

    And if you are wright why they have to force them in the army. The difference according to is so small.

    But what this government wants is to destroy the way of live of the Haredisch world.

    In the end this will destroy the country.

  8. Ron Kall says:

    "In the end this will destroy the country!? How?!

  9. Anonymous says:

    In other words; go to the army or go to work, those are your choices. But if you decide you want to study G-d's Torah and learn the mitzvot and spread G-d's word to others you will be punished- no legal ability to work- poverty- that's your punishment! Sounds totalitarian- Siberian style! Don't you realize that these thousands of students of Torah are causing a major bal teshuva generation in Israel that G-d is proud of. They are willing to do it even if the price is lower economic status. They should have the option to work or study or army- no coercion or punishment. They are helping the state- making us stronger against our enemies. Their studying contributes more to the security than if they stopped studying. We need both- men in uniform and men in the kollel- together its a partnership. The people studying Torah bring blessing to the soldiers in the field. Its all politics. Don't fall for it.

  10. Ruth Hirt says:

    Praying the same for Israeli Folks.

  11. Ruth Hirt says:

    Just like anyone else, they needed our support as well, in the same way we care for the socially needy folks all over the globe.

  12. Ruth Hirt says:

    Please correct me, as an onlooker, a neutral commenter, as to how far I understand, haredim have the legacy from Above, because they chose or they got the appointment from Eloihim to be in the service of the L_RD, studying and even interceeding for the people and Land, should be respected for who they are, owing to WHO they chose to dedicate their lives to. Israel, being a Nation inseparable, attached to Biblical precepts, should center legislation according to the mitzvot and Torah in the Holy Bible. May I ask, the Haredim are performing as the Levites' office? If yes, then it is justifiable that the people have to support them Haredim by each earner's tithes, isn't it? I can now gather that, they should devote in serving the sanctuary and the people's spiritual matters.

  13. AMEN! It's a great mitzvah to work, study AND serve in the armed forces!

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Terrorists attack Israeli soldiers with a Molotov cocktail in Arab village near Ramallah.
Palestinian Authority-American Shot Dead while Trying to Kill Jews
Latest Indepth Stories
British Flag

{Originally posted on author’s site, Liberty Unyielding} Never let a crisis go to waste. That’s the mantra – and a new development in Britain demonstrates how the Western left lives by it, and contributes thereby to the destruction of Western culture. Alert readers will remember the so-called “Trojan Horse plot” in Birmingham, first reported in […]

quiet

Introverts are more likely to pause, view the world from a distance, and think how to make it better

Lewis-102414-Nachal-Hareidi

I couldn’t see why I was different from Israeli boys my age. I too wanted to defend our country.

Eller-102414-Cart

I had to hire a babysitter so that I could go shopping or have someone come with me to push Caroline in her wheelchair.

Widespread agreement in Israel opposing Palestinian diplomatic warfare, commonly called “lawfare.”

Arab terrorism against Jews and the State of Israel is not something we should be “calm” about.

The Israeli left, led by tenured academics, endorses pretty much anything harmful to its own country

We were devastated: The exploitation of our father’s murder as a vehicle for political commentary.

Judea and Samaria (Yesha) have been governed by the IDF and not officially under Israeli sovereignty

While not all criticism of Israel stemmed from anti-Semitism, Podhoretz contends the level of animosity towards Israel rises exponentially the farther left one moved along the spectrum.

n past decades, Oman has struck a diplomatic balance between Saudi Arabia, the West, and Iran.

The Torah scroll which my family donated will ride aboard the USS Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier

The Jewish Press endorses the reelection of Gov. Andrew Cuomo. His record as governor these past four years offers eloquent testimony to the experience and vision he has to lead the Empire State for the next four years.

I think Seth Lipsky is amazing, but it just drives home the point that newspapers have a lot of moving parts.

More Articles from Stephen Leavitt
Chagall Shofar

5774 was notable for the national unity the Jewish people achieved. 5775 will bring with it new challenges we must be prepared to face.

Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat (L) visits the JewishPress.com booth at The Event.

Congratulations to all the winners of the JewishPress.com raffle at The Event

There’s a battle going on for Jerusalem’s soul, and Cinema City proves you don’t need to compromise on Shabbat or Kashrut to be a success.

A soldier called up to talk to my 5 year old son…

Your generous donations are helping soldiers continue their search for the kidnapped boys. Thank you.

Please give a donation. It goes to support our IDF soldiers searching for Eyal Yifrach, Gilad Shaar and Naftali Frankel.

Why is the state of Israel so afraid to apply sovereignty over Judaism’s most holiest site, and what can we do about it?

Our servers were overwhelmed yesterday by an article picked up on the Drudge Report. We love that!

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/new-draft-law-a-gift-of-hope-to-impoverished-haredim-and-to-israel/2013/07/14/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: