web analytics
April 18, 2015 / 29 Nisan, 5775
At a Glance
InDepth
Sponsored Post


Home » InDepth » Op-Eds »

Obama’s – And America’s – Journey


The Greek philosopher Heraclitus believed that reality is ever in flux. “You cannot step into the same river twice,” he taught, emphasizing that the only constant is change.

In this political season, everyone wanted to be the candidate of change. But on election night, that mantle clearly belonged to Barack Obama.

Likewise, the American poet Archibald MacLeish observed, “The American journey has not ended. America is never accomplished. America is always still to build.”

Nearly two centuries previously Edmund Burke wrote, “A state without the means of some change is without the means of its conservation.”

Change was the mantra of this election, and change is what brought Obama to the White House. America’s capacity for change is different from the kind that exists in other countries, where change connotes a complete rupture from the past.

Change in America is a continuing American revolution, rooted in the principles of the founders, a search for a more perfect union.

Those two ideas – the need for change, but a search for something better rather than complete revolution – found expression in Obama’s elegant words on election night in which he reminded us that the dream of the founders is very much alive in our time.

This election has special meaning for me because my cousin, Julius Genachowski, is an old friend and a longtime adviser of Obama. Julius was very active in the successful campaign and now is a member of the transition team. He and Obama attended Harvard Law School together in the early 1990s. They attended each other’s weddings and have remained close to this day.

Julius attended yeshiva through high school and studied in yeshiva in Israel before going to Columbia and then Harvard, where he met Obama. Julius later clerked for Supreme Court Justice David Souter. Obama and Julius bonded in part because both were outsiders – one a former yeshiva boy and son of immigrants, the other an African American with international roots.

Julius tells me Obama has always been able to relate to the Jewish experience because of his own background as well as the African-American experience of slavery and discrimination. Julius knows that part of Obama’s agenda is to heal the breach between Jews and blacks and to restore the close ties that existed during the civil rights movement.

Obama affirmed those ties at the AIPAC Policy Conference in June:

In the great social movements in our country’s history, Jewish and African Americans have stood shoulder to shoulder. They took buses down south together. They marched together. They bled together. And Jewish Americans like Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner were willing to die alongside a black man – James Chaney – on behalf of freedom and equality. Their legacy is our inheritance.

Julius also surely enjoyed these words from Obama at the conference:

I have been proud to be part of a strong, bipartisan consensus that has stood by Israel in the face of all threats. That is a commitment that both John McCain and I share because support for Israel in this country goes beyond party.

Obama later said, “Those who threaten Israel threaten us,” and “I will bring to the White House an unshakeable commitment to Israel’s security.”

Over the past eight years the American brand has been eroded and its prestige in the world diminished as we have become a go-alone nation, now with an economy in crisis. If America is weakened, Israel is weakened. When people asked me whom to vote for, I would respond, “Vote for the person you think is best for America. He is the person who is best for Israel.”

To those who say – and did so vociferously during the campaign – that Obama is too young and inexperienced to accomplish these goals, that he makes great speeches but that words are not enough, I would counter not to hold Obama’s age and oratory against him.

Before Obama, only three U.S. presidents had been elected in their 40s – Teddy Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy and Bill Clinton – and all brought their intellect and vigor to the art of governance.

They also were gifted speakers. Abraham Lincoln proved that words can save a nation during wartime; Franklin Roosevelt re-taught that lesson during a subsequent time of crisis.

About the Author: Rabbi Menachem Genack is chief executive officer of OU Kosher.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Obama’s – And America’s – Journey”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
Saudi-Hacker
Hackers Reportedly Infiltrate IDF Computer Network
Latest Indepth Stories
Mrs. Golda Katz a"h

She had many names and was many things to many people, but to me she was just Babineni.

ISIS terrorist carries the group's black flag.

Is ISIS in Gaza? “No, but there are ISIS loyalists here..we pray to God they unite under ISIS’ flag”

Cliff Rieders

Rabbi Portal was that great “inspirer,” changing people for the better, enriching the lives of all

MK Moshe-Feiglin

Iran knows Obama, Putin, and the Europeans don’t have a Red Line beyond which they will go to war

There is no way to explain the Holocaust. I know survivors who are not on speaking terms with G-d. I know many who are the opposite. I have no right to go there…

When a whole side of your family perishes, friends become the extended family you do not have.

“We stand with Israel because of its values and its greatness and because its such a wonderful ally”

Mr. Obama himself inelegantly cautioned members of the Senate to be careful not to “screw up” the negotiations by seeking to have input into the future of the sanctions regime that has been imposed on Iran.

For our community, Mrs. Clinton’s foreign policy record will doubtless attract the most attention. And it is a most interesting one.

Mitchell Bard is nothing if not prolific. He has written and edited 23 books, including “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Middle East” and “The Arab Lobby: The Invisible Alliance That Undermines America’s Interests in the Middle East.” Bard, who has a Ph.D. in political science from UCLA, is also the executive director of both the […]

Understanding the process described in Dayenu reveals deep relevance for us today.

For Rabbi Zvi Yehuda Kook, the tanks, planes, and uniforms of the IDF were implements of mitzvot

The only way to become humble is honesty about our experiences; it’s the only path to true humility

Obama’s approach to evildoers echoes Gandhi’s fatuous and muddleheaded pleas to his “friend” Hitler

More Articles from Rabbi Menachem Genack

The unusually severe sentence of 27 years in prison for Sholom Rubashkin is a victory for a prosecution that from the outset pursued a win-at-all-costs strategy. But the success comes at a price, and not just to the 51-year-old man now facing a virtual life sentence, his wife and 10 children. The government’s handling of this case has sullied our justice system.

The Greek philosopher Heraclitus believed that reality is ever in flux. “You cannot step into the same river twice,” he taught, emphasizing that the only constant is change.

Any slaughterhouse, whether kosher or non-kosher, is by definition a disconcerting, blood-filled and gruesome place. Torah law, however, is most insistent about not inflicting needless pain on animals and in emphasizing humane treatment of all living creatures.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/obamas-and-americas-journey/2008/11/19/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: