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The Middle East in the Super Powers House of Mirrors

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Attempting to understand the limping march towards peace in the Middle East without the benefit of historic perspective is like awakening in a house of mirrors where the lines between real and fake are blurred, where it is difficult to tell a foe from a friend, and where at times it seems that there is no way out. To comprehend the Middle East one must consider the convoluted, and often counterproductive role the super powers have played in the region.

The solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict resides in two separate spheres, that intertwine and often conflict each other. The first is the regional Israeli-Arab sphere. The second is the long standing and ongoing conflict between the US and Russia (beforehand the USSR). Within these spheres there exist numerous different dynamics and doctrines that render matters so convoluted that at times, when a regional solution appears within reach, super-power conflicting interests, that have little to do with the regional players, make an agreement unobtainable.

A case in point is the 1948 debate over the composition of an international force that was to be charged with securing the implementation of the United Nations Partition Plan. All the Soviets requested at the time was the inclusion of 5 Soviet officers in the international force. For the US, however, interdicting Soviet entry into Middle Eastern affairs was more important than enforcing the UN decision. From there on the parties could not agree on anything else, and the entire matter was dropped. The international keeping force and with it the Partition Plan, and the newly declared State of Israel all fell five Soviet soldiers short of fruition and thus were ushered in numerous wars and countless dead.

Another example is the 1984 meeting in New York between then Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko and then Israeli Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir. The former implored Shamir to consent to Soviet participation in an international peace conference, hoping that Israeli acquiescence to Soviet participation would lead to US acceptance of Soviet presence as well. Gromyko assured Shamir that all the Soviets wished for was a tiny little Palestinian state, but to no avail. The US doctrine was opposed to any legitimization of a Soviet (Russian) role in Middle East agreements and Israel followed suit. Perhaps, had Israel endorsed Gromyko’s request we would have enjoyed years of peace with a tiny little Palestinian State.

In 1979 the enormous super power complex was stripped away when the late Egyptian President Anwar Sadat applied an Occam’s razor to both the super powers (by bypassing the Geneva conference), and to the Arab League and initiated direct negotiations with Israel. Fearing super power destructive intervention, Sadat actually wrote a letter to then US President Jimmy Carter pleading with him not to interfere.

Israel’s doctrine of direct negotiations was born out of the negative experience of the 1949 Lausanne conference under the auspices of the United Nations, and out of concerns that future multinational conferences would favor Arab interests. Early in Israel’s history, Israel did attempt to include the Soviet Union as a party to peace negotiations, but that was mostly as a counter measure to various American and British peace proposals the core of which was taking away the Negev from Israel. The British and American goal at the time was to re-establish Arab territorial contiguity from Africa to the all the way to Iraq under British and pro-Western control (it was a world without long range ballistic missiles and territorial contiguity was an important strategic asset). This was an interest that both Israel and the U.S.S.R. opposed for their own different reasons. Since these early attempts and the eventual re-alignment of of Arab and Soviet interests, Israel has regarded Russian participation in peace talks to be undesirable.

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3 Responses to “The Middle East in the Super Powers House of Mirrors”

  1. This article brings up some good points. It also underscores the importance of Israel not buckling under pressure to accept the latest pressure tactic by the U.S. and international community. Israel would gladly cooperate and has offered economic accords with the Palestinians in return for an end of violence perpetrated against Israel by the Palestinians. The bottom line is as it has always been. There can be no hope for peace until the Palestinians accept Israel as a Jewish state.

  2. With all due respect, the conflicting interests of America and the Soviet Union (now, Russia) have nothing to do with the lack of peace in the conflict over Israel. Peace does not depend on Russia and America. It takes two to make peace, and so far, only the Israelis want peace. The other side is not just "Palestinians". This is not a "Palestinian-Israeli" conflict. It is not even an "Arab-Israeli" conflict. It is not a territorial conflict which can be resolved by drawing new lines on old maps. The Islamic Republic of Iran is Israel's deadliest enemy, and Iran is not even Arab, let alone "Palestinian". So, what is going on here? The fact is that not a single Moslem country recognizes Israel's right to exist, and the reason is that the Koran and sayings of Muhammad require Moslems to make war against the Jews and to either subjugate them or to kill them. In order to make peace with Israel, a religious Moslem would have to violate the sacred commands of his god and his prophet. He won't do it. We are dealing with an Islamic religious holy war on the Jews, and there is nothing that America or Russian can do about that except to disarm the Moslems and prevent them from prosecuting their holy war. Peace is out of the question.

  3. I agree totally. The other parties (US, Russian, etc.) may cloud the whole picture somewhat, but Iran and other countries have so clearly stated they want a world totally without Israel or its people-what's so hard to understand about that!?! It is hardly prejudicial to state the obvious…

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