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December 18, 2014 / 26 Kislev, 5775
 
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The Price We Pay For Contempt

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein

And when considering the hundreds of millions who are not spiritually engaged, would it not make more sense to speak of them as worthy of respect simply because they are endowed with tzelem Elokim?

The Latrun monastery is located in Emek Ayalon, the place where Yehoshua miraculously made the sun stop. Alas, for too many of our brethren, time has stopped with regard to the way they interact with non-Jews. While we won the biblical battle, we are not going to fare as well in the ones ahead if we cannot recognize the rules of the game in interacting with the world at large – and that we bear some of the burdens of galus even in our Jewish state.

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein directs interfaith affairs for the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles and holds the Irmas Adjunct Chair in Jewish Law at Loyola Law School.

About the Author: Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein is director of Interfaith Affairs of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles and the Sydney M Irmas adjunct chair, Jewish Law and Ethics, Loyola Law School.


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One Response to “The Price We Pay For Contempt”

  1. Rebekah Simon-Peter says:

    Thank you for this courageous post.

Comments are closed.

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A monastery in Israel is desecrated, almost certainly by nationalist extremists.

The desecration was condemned by the prime minister and others in the government. Chief Rabbi Metzger called it a “heinous deed.” The Internal Security minister did not hesitate to use the word “terror” and announced the formation of a special police unit to combat it. Many people traveled to the monastery to personally apologize, including Rabbi Dov Lipman of Beit Shemesh, who took brush in hand to help scrub the offensive words from the walls.

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