web analytics
January 26, 2015 / 6 Shevat, 5775
 
At a Glance
Special Features
Sponsored Post


Who Am I Voting For, and How Should You Vote?

At JewishPress.com we’ve spent countless hours discussing the pros and cons of voting for each particular party. Now we'll share some of the discussions that have made this election decision such a difficult one.

Ballots-2013-485x324

There’s no doubt that this is an unusual Israeli election. There are no real fights going on about how to deal with the Palestinians, nor about social welfare, and no one is even mentioning Iran.

The general consensus in Israel is that the outgoing government had us on the right track and was a good government, and this election is about whether the next government should focus either slightly more on this, or slightly more on that – issues it was already dealing with.

For now, the traditional Left-Right debate is irrelevant, simply because the majority of the nation understands the Left is as wrong about the Palestinians as they are about socialism.

And that’s why instead of the Left-Right debate, we have this massive infighting between political parties who are supposed to be on the same side.

This election is also significantly dirtier than any other I can recall in recent times, because it’s essentially internecine, with the parties not fighting over the undecided Center, but over their own existing shared voter base.

At JewishPress.com we’ve spent countless hours discussing the pros and cons of voting for each particular party, and for the purpose of transparency, we need to disclose that all the members of the staff have a relationship with one party or another, starting from our Likud Central Committee members, down to being friends, acquaintances and neighbors with the candidates and staff of HaBayit HaYehudi and Otmza L’Yisrael.

With Election Day tomorrow, in the office we face another unusual event, with the exception of our Likud Central Committee members, most of us are still undecided as to whom we plan to vote for. And the wavering is interesting, either Likud-Beytenu – HaBayit HaYehudi, HaBayit Hayehudi – Otzma L’Yisrael, and even Likud-Beytenu – Otzma L’Yisrael.

The success of each party carries with it, its own risks and benefits, and I hope to share with you some of the discussions that have made this election decision such a difficult one.

Likud-Beytenu

There’s almost no doubt that the Likud will be the largest individual party.

For the most part, it has an excellent list of prospective MKs. It is prepared to deal with the important national issues that this country faces such as Chareidi integration, electoral reform, and Iran.

With the exception (we’ll get to that) of the settlements, Netanyahu has been an excellent Prime Minister, he’s protected Israel’s interests, and there’s no doubt he’s qualified to continue leading the country.

A large Likud would give them the mandate to do what they want, and what needs to be done.

But there’s a definite downside.

First of all the Settlements.

We certainly can’t ignore that Netanyahu heavily invested in settlement infrastructure such as schools and roads, as well as upgrading Ariel University. And no established Jewish towns were evacuated in this last term.

But he’s had the settlements on a starvation diet when it comes to additional housing – something that would have also helped the country’s center too, by releasing a lot of the housing pressure.

Then there was the Settlement Freeze, and letting Ehud Barak have a free and violent hand in Judea and Samaria, and there is the still purposely unadopted Edmond Levy report. Netanyahu had political reasons to use the Jews of Judea and Samaria as pawns in the larger political game, but it’s still unpleasant to be a pawn.

There’s no reason to assume that under a new Netanyahu-led government it won’t be more of the same, especially if things change and the Palestinian issue becomes important again.

The threats and intimidation coming out of the Likud, that there will be negative ramifications if a significant number of Settler don’t vote Likud, aren’t helping them win over friends and voters either.

The second issue comes down to who will also be sitting in the coalition.

There’s little doubt that Yair Lapid’s Yesh Atid will be in, despite his left-wing, secularist views, or perhaps even because of them. He’s a comfortable partner for Netanyahu.

Kadima is likely to be there if they pass the threshold, and possibly even Tzipi Livni.

Numerically there won’t be a choice, particularly if Netanyahu doesn’t want the Chareidi parties in – which it seems he doesn’t.

About the Author: Stephen's company, WebAds, builds and manages online newspapers and websites to high volume readership and profitability.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

2 Responses to “Who Am I Voting For, and How Should You Vote?”

  1. Batya Spiegelman Medad says:

    Like many anglo Israelis you got it wrong re: influence. We need a strong Righ opposition, which we won't have without Otzma in the knesset. Remember that the NRP-Bayit Yehudi people did not give good spots to Arieh Eldad and Michael Ben-Ari. They didn't want them in and didn't want their influence. They just wanted the votes.
    Bibi does not poll his cabinet ministers nor his MKs when making policy decisions, so in actuallity the coaliton has less power than the oppositon. Let's all pray that there be Otzma LeYisrael in the Knesset to be the oppositon we can count on.

  2. Toby Stupp says:

    Otzma will do exactly what happened in 92. Intelligent people learn from experience. Unfortunately others do not. I will never make that mistake again.

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Hassnain Aliamin , one of four Muslim teenagers who attacked a Jew in Gateshead.
‘Let’s Go Jew-Bashing’ Muslims Hauled into British Court
Latest Special-features Stories
Michael Ben-Ari launches his Otzma party election campaign.

The small right-wing parties will hurt their ideological allies and voters, unless they get past their egos and ideological perfectionism and help their side for a change.

Caroline Glick

Netanyahu will reportedly be offering a spot on the Likud list to Caroline Glick.

Livni & Herzog Switch Sides

Apparently the Arabs believe that all these years they voted for Labor, they were not voting for a Zionist party.

Likud pulls ahead, and quite incredibly Shas is making a comeback, but forming a coalition still depends on the small parties.

The wanabee prime minister has a solid, 100 percent certain policy of being uncertain.

They were afraid they would not pass the electoral threshold running separately.

The IDF will award 53 soldiers, among them 4 women, military decorations for their service during this past summer’s Operation “Protective Edge”.

The merged Labor party, AKA the “Zionist Camp” headed by Yitzchak Herzog and Tzipi Livni, has drafted former military intelligence chief Amos Yadlin to fill its vacuum for a future Defense Minister if it forms the next government. Israel Radio (Voice of Israel) was quick to promote Yadlin Tuesday morning with soft-glove questions that allowed […]

Yisrael Beytenu introduced his list, and even added a native English speaker, even if he stuck him in an unrealistic spot.

The popular right-wing Knesset Member now is in the 20th place on the list of candidates.

The inclusion of Hager may help Yishai’s party get enough voters to be elected to the Knesset.

The younger generation is decidedly left-wing and right-wing.

This is hands down the best election commercial I’ve seen so far. Netanyahu is a kindergarten school teacher with an unruly class made up of his former coalition partners. Of course, you can always look at it as saying that Netanyahu is unable to control the class, and it’s his fault. Either way, its definitely […]

Shamir is quitting Avigdor Libermans’ party, will he join the Likud?

Stern quit Livni’s party last month…

More Articles from Stephen Leavitt
Chagall Shofar

5774 was notable for the national unity the Jewish people achieved. 5775 will bring with it new challenges we must be prepared to face.

Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat (L) visits the JewishPress.com booth at The Event.

Congratulations to all the winners of the JewishPress.com raffle at The Event

There’s a battle going on for Jerusalem’s soul, and Cinema City proves you don’t need to compromise on Shabbat or Kashrut to be a success.

A soldier called up to talk to my 5 year old son…

Your generous donations are helping soldiers continue their search for the kidnapped boys. Thank you.

Please give a donation. It goes to support our IDF soldiers searching for Eyal Yifrach, Gilad Shaar and Naftali Frankel.

Why is the state of Israel so afraid to apply sovereignty over Judaism’s most holiest site, and what can we do about it?

Our servers were overwhelmed yesterday by an article picked up on the Drudge Report. We love that!

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/who-am-i-voting-for/2013/01/21/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: