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May 23, 2015 / 5 Sivan, 5775
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Why I Voted For Obama (And Why I’m Not Worried About The Next Four Years)


Obama is much more likely than McCain would have been to seek a swifter resolution to the Iraq war. And despite what some hawkish supporters of Israel believe, the Iraq war has not been good for Israel. It has shifted the regional balance of power to Iran, and few doubt that a nuclear Iran would be a dangerous threat to Israel.

Additionally, having America’s armed forces deeply committed in both Iraq and Afghanistan severely undercuts our ability to respond to any threats made by Iran – whether those threats are directed at the U.S. or Israel.

Of course, Israel was not my only reason for supporting Obama. It is time, I believe, for a smart man – an intellectual man – to lead this nation. The problems we face today are frightening in their scope as they are overwhelming in their depth.

So I say to my fellow Orthodox Jews, let’s be on Obama’s side – and rather than running around scared making offensive remarks, let’s endeavor to make sure he stays on our side.

About the Author: Shoshana Batya Greenwald recently received a master's degree in decorative arts, material culture and design history from Bard Graduate Center. She is the collections manager at Kleinman Family Holocaust Educational Center (KFHEC) and a freelance writer.


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