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January 26, 2015 / 6 Shevat, 5775
 
At a Glance
Judaism
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Spiritual Infusion: Balancing Body and Soul, Anger and Gratitude
 
Pres. Rivlin Meets with Henry Kissinger

January 26, 2015 - 11:03 AM
 
Gaza’s Hamas Allows Israeli Imports After 5 Years

January 26, 2015 - 10:40 AM
 
Northeastern United States Gears Up for Epic Blizzard

January 26, 2015 - 9:27 AM
 
Jewish Agency Planning for Massive Aliyah of 120,000 French Jews

January 26, 2015 - 2:28 AM
 
Iranian News: ‘Teheran Targeted Netanyahu’s Sons’ in Retaliation

January 25, 2015 - 11:06 PM
 
‘No Opportunity’ in Obama’s Schedule for Hosting President Rivlin

January 25, 2015 - 8:48 PM
 
Israel Extends Reservists’ Duty in North

January 25, 2015 - 7:59 PM
 
Argentine Journalist Flees for Life, Lands in Israel

January 25, 2015 - 7:52 PM
 
Palestinian Authority Incitement: Israel Planned French Terror

January 25, 2015 - 7:08 PM
 
Prime Minister Netanyahu’s Remarks Prior to Cabinet Meeting

January 25, 2015 - 6:06 PM
 
Pipe Bomb Found at Entrance to Neve Tzuf

January 25, 2015 - 6:04 PM
 
Egged Drivers May Shut Down Buses on Monday in Warning Strike

January 25, 2015 - 4:33 PM
 
United Hatzalah Newest ‘Ambucycle’

January 25, 2015 - 3:47 PM
 
Israel’s Condolences to Japan on ISIS Beheading

January 25, 2015 - 2:18 PM
 
Netanyahu ‘Will Go Anywhere Invited’ to Prevent Iran from Achieving Nuclear Weapons

January 25, 2015 - 1:58 PM
 
Forensics Prove Jewish Center Bombing Case Prosecutor Alberto Nisman Murdered

January 25, 2015 - 1:35 PM
 
‘Leave Canada’ Graffitied on Canada Shul

January 25, 2015 - 12:38 PM
 
A Yishai–Ben-Ari Mashup Would Hurt Bayit Yehudi, but No Mashup Will be Even Worse

January 25, 2015 - 11:42 AM
 
13 Year Old Boy Attacked in Paris Suburb

January 25, 2015 - 4:01 AM
 
French Soldier Accidentally Fires His Gun Outside Jewish Center

January 25, 2015 - 3:47 AM
 
Credible Bomb Threats Ground Two US Airliners in Atlanta, GA

January 25, 2015 - 3:08 AM
 
Hezbollah Vows to Attack Israel ‘With Wisdom’

January 25, 2015 - 2:15 AM
 
Dollar-Shekel Rate Breaks 4.0 Barrier

January 25, 2015 - 1:34 AM
 
Update on Status of Tel Aviv Bus Terror Victims

January 25, 2015 - 12:36 AM
 
Berlin Won’t Name German Companies Involved in Syria’s C-Weapons Program

January 24, 2015 - 11:06 PM
 
Time-Honored White House Diplomatic Traditions on Israel

January 24, 2015 - 10:28 PM
 
Caroline Glick to be Offered Likud Spot

January 24, 2015 - 8:48 PM
 
Arabs Hate the Zionist Camp

January 24, 2015 - 7:38 PM
 
Fatah: Protests Against Occupation on Monday, Jan. 26

January 24, 2015 - 7:08 PM
 
ISIS Reportedly Executes a Japanese Citizen

January 24, 2015 - 6:53 PM
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Ask the Rabbi
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Posted on: July 17th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: I have numerous questions about Kiddush Levanah. First, why is this prayer called Kiddush Levanah? Shouldn’t it be called Chiddush Levanah considering that the prayer concerns the renewal – not the sanctification – of the moon? Second, why do we greet each other with the words Shalom Aleichem at Kiddush Levanah and why do we repeat the greeting three times? Is it because we have not seen a new moon for a whole month? Third, why does Kiddush Levanah – and other prayers – contain verses (aside from the Shalom Aleichem greeting) that we are supposed to say three times? Please elaborate on this mitzvah. Ira Warshansky (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: July 10th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: I have numerous questions about Kiddush Levanah. First, why is this prayer called Kiddush Levanah? Shouldn’t it be called Chiddush Levanah considering that the prayer concerns the renewal – not the sanctification – of the moon? Second, why do we greet each other with the words Shalom Aleichem at Kiddush Levanah and why do we repeat the greeting three times? Is it because we have not seen a new moon for a whole month? Third, why does Kiddush Levanah – and other prayers – contain verses (aside from the Shalom Aleichem greeting) that we are supposed to say three times? Please elaborate on this mitzvah. Ira Warshansky (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: July 4th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: I have numerous questions about Kiddush Levanah. First, why is this prayer called Kiddush Levanah? Shouldn’t it be called Chiddush Levanah considering that the prayer concerns the renewal – not the sanctification – of the moon? Second, why do we greet each other with the words Shalom Aleichem at Kiddush Levanah and why do we repeat the greeting three times? Is it because we have not seen a new moon for a whole month? Third, why does Kiddush Levanah – and other prayers – contain verses (aside from the Shalom Aleichem greeting) that we are supposed to say three times? Please elaborate on this mitzvah. Ira Warshansky (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: June 27th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: I have numerous questions about Kiddush Levanah. First, why is this prayer called Kiddush Levanah? Shouldn’t it be called Chiddush Levanah considering that the prayer concerns the renewal – not the sanctification – of the moon? Second, why do we greet each other with the words Shalom Aleichem at Kiddush Levanah and why do we repeat the greeting three times? Is it because we have not seen a new moon for a whole month? Third, why does Kiddush Levanah – and other prayers – contain verses (aside from the Shalom Aleichem greeting) that we are supposed to say three times? Please elaborate on this mitzvah. Ira Warshansky (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: June 20th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: As Shavuot is fast approaching – a holiday on which we dwell on the story of Ruth and the origins of the royal house of David – I was wondering if you could help me resolve something. The Mishnah never makes any mention of the Hasmonean kings, the mitzvah to light a Chanukah menorah, or the miracle of the oil that lasted eight days. Some people say that Rabbi Yehudah HaNassi – the redactor of the six orders of the Mishnah and a scion of King David – omitted these topics because the Hasmoneans improperly crowned themselves, ignoring the rule that all Jewish kings are supposed to come from the tribe of Yehudah. They argue that this is also why the Talmud does not include a separate tractate on Chanukah. Is this true? Menachem (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: June 13th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: As Shavuot is fast approaching – a holiday on which we dwell on the story of Ruth and the origins of the royal house of David – I was wondering if you could help me resolve something. The Mishnah never makes any mention of the Hasmonean kings, the mitzvah to light a Chanukah menorah, or the miracle of the oil that lasted eight days. Some people say that Rabbi Yehudah HaNassi – the redactor of the six orders of the Mishnah and a scion of King David – omitted these topics because the Hasmoneans improperly crowned themselves, ignoring the rule that all Jewish kings are supposed to come from the tribe of Yehudah. They argue that this is also why the Talmud does not include a separate tractate on Chanukah. Is this true? Menachem (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: June 6th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

(Please note: The question has been modified to reflect amendments suggested by a reader, Yisrael Levi, in last week’s column.)

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Posted on: May 30th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: As Shavuot is fast approaching – a holiday on which we dwell on the story of Ruth and the origins of the royal house of David – I was wondering if you could help me resolve something. Some people say that Rabbi Yehudah HaNassi, the redactor of the six orders of the Mishnah and a scion of King David, purposely kept any mention of Chanukah and the Hasmonean kings out of the Mishnah because the Hasmoneans improperly crowned themselves and ignored the rule that all Jewish kings are supposed to come from the tribe of Yehudah. Is this true? Menachem (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: May 22nd, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: As Shavuot is fast approaching – a holiday on which we dwell on the story of Ruth and the origins of the royal house of David – I was wondering if you could help me resolve something. Some people say that Rabbi Yehudah HaNassi, the redactor of the six orders of the Mishnah and a scion of King David, purposely kept any mention of Chanukah and the Hasmonean kings out of the Mishnah because the Hasmoneans improperly crowned themselves and ignored the rule that all Jewish kings are supposed to come from the tribe of Yehudah. Is this true? Menachem (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: May 14th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: As Shavuot is fast approaching – a holiday on which we dwell on the story of Ruth and the origins of the royal house of David – I was wondering if you could help me resolve something. Some people say that Rabbi Yehudah HaNassi, the redactor of the six orders of the Mishnah and a scion of King David, purposely kept any mention of Chanukah and the Hasmonean kings out of the Mishnah because the Hasmoneans improperly crowned themselves and ignored the rule that all Jewish kings are supposed to come from the tribe of Yehudah. Is this true? Menachem (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: May 9th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: As the shamash in a small community shul with an aging population, I am faced with numerous challenges. The following is only one of them. During sefirah, different people daven for the amud for Ma’ariv. Once, a bar mitzvah was one of them. On another occasion, a very recent ger lead the service. Were these individuals allowed to lead the congregation in counting sefirah? I also wonder, in general, if everyone should be trusted to lead the counting. What if someone forgot to count on one of the previous nights but does not inform anyone of this? No Name (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: May 1st, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: As the shamash in a small community shul with an aging population, I am faced with numerous challenges. The following is only one of them. During sefirah, different people daven for the amud for Ma’ariv. Once, a bar mitzvah was one of them. On another occasion, a very recent ger lead the service. Were these individuals allowed to lead the congregation in counting sefirah? I also wonder, in general, if everyone should be trusted to lead the counting. What if someone forgot to count on one of the previous nights but does not inform anyone of this? No Name (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: April 24th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: As the shamash in a small community shul with an aging population, I am faced with numerous challenges. The following is only one of them. During sefirah, different people daven for the amud for Ma’ariv. Once, a bar mitzvah was one of them. On another occasion, a very recent ger lead the service. Were these individuals allowed to lead the congregation in counting sefirah? I also wonder, in general, if everyone should be trusted to lead the counting. What if someone forgot to count on one of the previous nights but does not inform anyone of this? No Name (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: April 17th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: May someone who desecrates the Sabbath lead the services if he has yahrzeit? If yes, may he replace someone else who has yahrzeit? Hayim Grosz (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: April 11th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: May someone who desecrates the Sabbath lead the services if he has yahrzeit? If yes, may he replace someone else who has yahrzeit? Hayim Grosz (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: April 4th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: May someone who desecrates the Sabbath lead the services if he has yahrzeit? If yes, may he replace someone else who has yahrzeit? Hayim Grosz (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: March 25th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: May someone who desecrates the Sabbath lead the services if he has yahrzeit? If yes, may he replace someone else who has yahrzeit? Hayim Grosz (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: March 21st, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Please explain the concept of selling one’s chametz. Wouldn’t it be simpler just to dispose of all of one’s chametz prior to Pesach? Why go through this charade every year? Malka Berg (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: March 13th, 2013

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Question: We are ba’alei teshuvah in the process of becoming more observant. We wish to kasher our home and utensils for Passover with minimal expense. Do you have any suggestions? Names withheld by request

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Posted on: March 7th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: May someone who desecrates the Sabbath lead the services if he has yahrzeit? If yes, may he replace someone else who has yahrzeit? Hayim Grosz (Via E-Mail)

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