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April 20, 2015 / 1 Iyar, 5775
At a Glance
Judaism
041715 FINAL
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Surviving Auschwitz: Kate Bernath’s Testimonial
 
Khamenei Mocks Obama Officials’ Silly Bluffs’

April 20, 2015 - 12:26 AM
 
More PA Lobbying from the State Dept Briefing Room

April 19, 2015 - 11:49 PM
 
African Christians Slaughtered by ISIS-Affiliates

April 19, 2015 - 4:49 PM
 
PLO Targets Israeli Soccer Athletes

April 19, 2015 - 4:43 PM
 
British Posters Warn Muslim Voting in Elections Violates Islamic Law

April 19, 2015 - 2:26 PM
 
Israeli Reporter Describes Personal Experience with Anti-Semitism in Paris

April 19, 2015 - 2:04 PM
 
Netanyahu Warns of Increased Iran Aggression in Middle East

April 19, 2015 - 12:56 PM
 
Haifa Mayor Blocks ‘Polluting Factories’

April 19, 2015 - 12:25 PM
 
US Consulate Targeted by ISIS in Iraqi Kurdistan

April 19, 2015 - 11:19 AM
 
Weather Forecast Rains Out BBQ for Yom Ha’Atzmaut

April 19, 2015 - 10:47 AM
 
New Pilots at Turkish Airlines Urged to ‘Marry’

April 19, 2015 - 9:58 AM
 
Liberman and Bennett Teaming Up Against Netanyahu

April 19, 2015 - 9:49 AM
 
Bomb Explodes at UNRWA Headquarters in Gaza

April 19, 2015 - 9:18 AM
 
Obama’s Creativity: Signing Bonus Substituting for Sanctions Lifting

April 19, 2015 - 12:49 AM
 
Shira Klein Medical Update

April 19, 2015 - 12:30 AM
 
Philanthropist and Self-Made Millionaire Taubman Dies at Age 91

April 19, 2015 - 12:19 AM
 
Putin Warns Israel Against Weapons Sales to Ukraine as it Lifts Ban on S300 Sale to Iran

April 18, 2015 - 11:58 PM
 
Netanyahu Visits Grave of his Entebbe Hero Brother

April 18, 2015 - 11:48 PM
 
ISIS Expands To Afghanistan and Kills 35 in Suicide Attack

April 18, 2015 - 11:28 PM
 
Saudis and Egypt Considering Large Scale Military Exercise

April 18, 2015 - 10:04 PM
 
Israel Caves in to US and Frees Tax Money for PA without Erasing Debt

April 18, 2015 - 9:54 PM
 
Hackers Reportedly Infiltrate IDF Computer Network

April 18, 2015 - 8:48 PM
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singing in the rain 2
 

Posted on: October 10th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

What does a person do if he left Israel after the 7th of Cheshvan (October 11, 2013), where they already commenced saying "Ve'ten tal u'matar", but before they start saying it in galut?

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Posted on: October 3rd, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: We find coronets on top of certain letters in the Torah – namely shin, ayin, tet, nun, zayin, gimmel and tzaddi. What purpose, if any, do they serve? Menachem (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: September 25th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Over the last several years, a number of European countries have outlawed shechitah (Jewish ritual slaughter). The latest, disturbingly, is Poland where shechitah opponents portray it as being cruel. Is there anything that we in the Jewish community can do to counter this trend? Jay Alt (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: September 18th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: In L’David Hashem Ori – which we recite from the beginning of Elul until Shemini Atzeret – we read the following: “Bikrov alay me’re’im le’echol et besarai – When evildoers approach me to devour my flesh.” Why does the verse use the word “me’re’im”? Why not use “resha’im” or “anashim ra’im” instead? Tzila Kleinbart Brooklyn, NY

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Posted on: September 12th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: In “L’David Hashem Ori” – which we recite from the beginning of Elul until Shemini Atzeret – we read the following: “Bikrov alay me’reim le’echol et besarai – When evildoers approach me to devour my flesh.” Why does the verse use the word “me’reim”? Why not use “resha’im” or “anashim ra’im” instead? Tzila Kleinbart Brooklyn, NY

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Posted on: September 4th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: In “L’David Hashem Ori” – which we recite from the beginning of Elul until Shemini Atzeret – we read the following: “Bikrov alay me’reim le’echol et besarai – When evildoers approach me to devour my flesh.” Why does the verse use the word “me’reim”? Why not use “resha’im” or “anashim ra’im” instead? Tzila Kleinbart Brooklyn, NY

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Posted on: August 29th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: How should one properly do teshuvah during Elul as we approach the Days of Awe, the Yamim Nora’im? Zvi Unger (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: August 22nd, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: How should one properly do teshuvah during Elul as we approach the Days of Awe, the Yamim Nora’im? Zvi Unger (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: August 14th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: The famous Iggeret of Rav Sherira Gaon references Yerushalmi Kilaim 9:3 and Kesubos 12:3 and states that Rabbi Judah the Prince descended from Hillel who, in turn, descended from the tribe of Binyamin – not Yehudah. The Iggeret also discusses how the Mishnah was written and how Rabbi Judah worked on it. Had Menachem read this Iggeret by Rav Sherira Gaon – who, incidentally, was a direct descendant of King David – I don’t think he would have asked his question. Yehuda T. (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: August 7th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: The famous Iggeret of Rav Sherira Gaon references Yerushalmi Kilaim 9:3 and Kesubos 12:3 and states that Rabbi Judah the Prince descended from Hillel who, in turn, descended from the tribe of Binyamin – not Yehudah. The Iggeret also discusses how the Mishnah was written and how Rabbi Judah worked on it. Had Menachem read this Iggeret by Rav Sherira Gaon – who, incidentally, was a direct descendant of King David – I don’t think he would have asked his question. Yehuda T. (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: August 1st, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: The famous Iggeret of Rav Sherira Gaon references Yerushalmi Kilaim 9:3 and Kesubos 12:3 and states that Rabbi Judah the Prince descended from Hillel who, in turn, descended from the tribe of Binyamin – not Yehudah. The Iggeret also discusses how the Mishnah was written and how Rabbi Judah worked on it. Had Menachem read this Iggeret by Rav Sherira Gaon – who, incidentally, was a direct descendant of King David – I don’t think he would have asked his question. Yehuda T. (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: July 25th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: The famous Iggeret of Rav Sherira Gaon references Yerushalmi Kilaim 9:3 and Kesubos 12:3 and states that Rabbi Judah the Prince descended from Hillel who, in turn, descended from the tribe of Binyamin – not Yehudah. The Iggeret also discusses how the Mishnah was written and how Rabbi Judah worked on it. Had Menachem read this Iggeret by Rav Sherira Gaon – who, incidentally, was a direct descendant of King David – I don’t think he would have asked his question. Yehuda T. (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: July 17th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: I have numerous questions about Kiddush Levanah. First, why is this prayer called Kiddush Levanah? Shouldn’t it be called Chiddush Levanah considering that the prayer concerns the renewal – not the sanctification – of the moon? Second, why do we greet each other with the words Shalom Aleichem at Kiddush Levanah and why do we repeat the greeting three times? Is it because we have not seen a new moon for a whole month? Third, why does Kiddush Levanah – and other prayers – contain verses (aside from the Shalom Aleichem greeting) that we are supposed to say three times? Please elaborate on this mitzvah. Ira Warshansky (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: July 10th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: I have numerous questions about Kiddush Levanah. First, why is this prayer called Kiddush Levanah? Shouldn’t it be called Chiddush Levanah considering that the prayer concerns the renewal – not the sanctification – of the moon? Second, why do we greet each other with the words Shalom Aleichem at Kiddush Levanah and why do we repeat the greeting three times? Is it because we have not seen a new moon for a whole month? Third, why does Kiddush Levanah – and other prayers – contain verses (aside from the Shalom Aleichem greeting) that we are supposed to say three times? Please elaborate on this mitzvah. Ira Warshansky (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: July 4th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: I have numerous questions about Kiddush Levanah. First, why is this prayer called Kiddush Levanah? Shouldn’t it be called Chiddush Levanah considering that the prayer concerns the renewal – not the sanctification – of the moon? Second, why do we greet each other with the words Shalom Aleichem at Kiddush Levanah and why do we repeat the greeting three times? Is it because we have not seen a new moon for a whole month? Third, why does Kiddush Levanah – and other prayers – contain verses (aside from the Shalom Aleichem greeting) that we are supposed to say three times? Please elaborate on this mitzvah. Ira Warshansky (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: June 27th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: I have numerous questions about Kiddush Levanah. First, why is this prayer called Kiddush Levanah? Shouldn’t it be called Chiddush Levanah considering that the prayer concerns the renewal – not the sanctification – of the moon? Second, why do we greet each other with the words Shalom Aleichem at Kiddush Levanah and why do we repeat the greeting three times? Is it because we have not seen a new moon for a whole month? Third, why does Kiddush Levanah – and other prayers – contain verses (aside from the Shalom Aleichem greeting) that we are supposed to say three times? Please elaborate on this mitzvah. Ira Warshansky (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: June 20th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: As Shavuot is fast approaching – a holiday on which we dwell on the story of Ruth and the origins of the royal house of David – I was wondering if you could help me resolve something. The Mishnah never makes any mention of the Hasmonean kings, the mitzvah to light a Chanukah menorah, or the miracle of the oil that lasted eight days. Some people say that Rabbi Yehudah HaNassi – the redactor of the six orders of the Mishnah and a scion of King David – omitted these topics because the Hasmoneans improperly crowned themselves, ignoring the rule that all Jewish kings are supposed to come from the tribe of Yehudah. They argue that this is also why the Talmud does not include a separate tractate on Chanukah. Is this true? Menachem (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: June 13th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: As Shavuot is fast approaching – a holiday on which we dwell on the story of Ruth and the origins of the royal house of David – I was wondering if you could help me resolve something. The Mishnah never makes any mention of the Hasmonean kings, the mitzvah to light a Chanukah menorah, or the miracle of the oil that lasted eight days. Some people say that Rabbi Yehudah HaNassi – the redactor of the six orders of the Mishnah and a scion of King David – omitted these topics because the Hasmoneans improperly crowned themselves, ignoring the rule that all Jewish kings are supposed to come from the tribe of Yehudah. They argue that this is also why the Talmud does not include a separate tractate on Chanukah. Is this true? Menachem (Via E-Mail)

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Posted on: June 6th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

(Please note: The question has been modified to reflect amendments suggested by a reader, Yisrael Levi, in last week’s column.)

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Posted on: May 30th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: As Shavuot is fast approaching – a holiday on which we dwell on the story of Ruth and the origins of the royal house of David – I was wondering if you could help me resolve something. Some people say that Rabbi Yehudah HaNassi, the redactor of the six orders of the Mishnah and a scion of King David, purposely kept any mention of Chanukah and the Hasmonean kings out of the Mishnah because the Hasmoneans improperly crowned themselves and ignored the rule that all Jewish kings are supposed to come from the tribe of Yehudah. Is this true? Menachem (Via E-Mail)

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