web analytics
October 9, 2015 / 26 Tishri, 5776
At a Glance
Sponsored Post

Q & A: Shabbat Shuttle? (Part II)


However, if a person cannot ambulate without a wheelchair, then surely it should be considered an extension of his body, similar to a cane, walker, or crutches. Thus, if a person has a clear disability, the prohibition of “uvdin d’chol” does not apply.

Another prohibition that might apply is “metaken kli shir – repairing a musical instrument” (Mechaber, infra 339:3) in the event that a wheel or other integral part of the wheelchair’s mechanism falls into disrepair. One would normally be prohibited to use such an item due to the fear that it will break and one will perform a repair on Shabbat. In the case of a disabled person, however, we waive this concern.

Rabbi Neuwirth notes that if a wheelchair is motorized, one must take care not to use the motor on Shabbat. Further, he notes that even if there is no eruv, a disabled person may wheel himself or be wheeled by a gentile for the purposes of a mitzvah (such as going to shul or perhaps attending a brit milah or going to learn Torah) because the prohibited activity in this case is only a shevut d’shevut.

It goes without saying that where there is no eruv, a disabled person is prohibited from carrying any items on his person (his lap or his pockets or on the wheelchair itself – i.e., on the handles – save for the cushion upon which he sits).

What emerges clearly from all this is that motorized means of transport are forbidden on Shabbat. The wheelchair itself may be used; however, its motor may not. Therefore, it would seem that riding on a vehicle which moves about only by means of its motor should be forbidden.

(To be continued)

About the Author: Rabbi Yaakov Klass, rav of Congregation K’hal Bnei Matisyahu in Flatbush, Brooklyn, is Torah Editor of The Jewish Press. He can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com.

If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Q & A: Shabbat Shuttle? (Part II)”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
Terrorist killed in Kiryat Arba stabbing attack Friday.
Terrorist Shot Dead after Stabbing Policeman in Kiryat Arba [video]

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/ask-the-rabbi/q-a-shabbat-shuttle-part-ii/2014/01/02/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: