web analytics
July 22, 2014 / 24 Tammuz, 5774
Israel at War: Operation Protective Edge
 
 
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post
IDC Advocacy Room IDC Fights War on Another Front

Student Union opens ‘hasbara’ room in effort to fill public diplomacy vacuum.



Q & A: Traveling And Missing Menorah Lighting (Part I)

QuestionsandAnswers-logo

Question: I am contemplating traveling to Israel. My flight will take place during Chanukah, which means that I may miss one night’s candle lighting. What are my options?

Yaakov J
(Via E-Mail)

Answer: First, be assured that according to halacha you are allowed to fly during Chanukah. Second, as we shall show, if you miss lighting Chanukah candles on one of the nights, you may still light on the subsequent nights.

The Gemara (Shabbos, “Bameh Madlikin,” 21b) establishes the timeframe for lighting Chanukah candles. According to a baraisa,Mitzvatah mi’shetishka hachama ad she’tichleh regel min hashuk – Its observance is from the time the sun sets (shekiah) until pedestrian traffic in the marketplace [e.g. the streets] has ceased.”

The Gemara asks: Does that mean that one is required to relight the candles if they became extinguished within that period of time? No, the Gemara says. The baraisa means that if it is night and one has not yet lit the candles, one can still do so until pedestrian traffic ceases; alternatively, the baraisa means to inform us that we need to prepare enough oil so that the menorah burns for this length of time of shekiah until pedestrian traffic ceases.

When does “pedestrian traffic in the marketplace” cease? Rabba b. Bar Hanna said in the name of R. Yochanan, “[When] the people from Tadmor (also called Palmyreans) have departed.” Rashi explains that Palmyreans were merchants who sold kindling branches to passersby; they were known to linger until the people had bought the lighting materials they needed.

Tosafot (sv “De’i la adlik madlik”) quote the R”I Porat (Rabbi Joseph Ben Moses of Troyes, known as Rabbi Joseph Porat, 12th century) who says that one must be careful to light Chanukah candles as soon as possible – i.e., at sunset – and not tarry more than necessary. But in the event that he did delay, perhaps due to circumstances beyond his control, he should still light out of doubt (safek). The R”I then adds that the time limit of “until pedestrian traffic in the marketplace has ceased” does not affect us anymore since we light indoors for the members of the household nowadays.

The Rambam (Hilchot Chanukah 4:5) defines the time “from sunset until pedestrian traffic in the marketplace has ceased” as “a half-hour or more.” Thereafter one should not light Chanukah candles.

The Mordechai (Shabbos ibid.) states, quoting his teacher Rav Meir, the Maharam of Rothenburg, that if someone misses one night he should not light on subsequent nights. He arrives at this conclusion based on the Gemara which states that the observance of lighting Chanukah candles is tied to a specific time frame. We will soon see that the ruling cited by the Mordechai is attributed to the Rambam as well.

The Tur (Orach Chayim 672, Hilchot Chanukah) takes issue with the Rambam, but the text he appears to be quoting is not the Rambam’s text we have today. Although our text of the Rambam does not say so explicitly, it seems that most would agree that the Rambam does in fact maintain that if one misses lighting one night, one should not light on subsequent nights.

The Tur cites the Tosafot quoted above as a basis for his own ruling that one should not light Chanukah candles on subsequent nights after missing lighting one night. But his proof is not clear cut since Tosafot do not specifically discuss the nights following a night on which one doesn’t light. The wording of Tosafot, however, must have led him to think that Tosafot hold this view.

In his commentary on the Tur (ad loc.) the Beit Yosef discusses numerous halachic sources, as well as the aforementioned Mordechai, supporting the opinion that if a person missed lighting one night, he should not light Chanukah candles on subsequent nights. He also cites a Teshuvah Ashkenazit according to which the ruling of Rav Meir of Rothenburg, as quoted by the Mordechai, can be understood to mean that if a person is late in lighting candles on one night, he has lost the opportunity of observing the mitzvah in the best possible manner on that particular night only. But as far as the other nights are concerned, he should proceed with lighting, for the miracle occurred on every one of the days of Chanukah.

This, thus, is a source for a “reading” of the Rambam that is more consistent with the text of the Rambam as we know it.

(To be continued)

About the Author: Rabbi Yaakov Klass, rav of Congregation K’hal Bnei Matisyahu in Flatbush, Brooklyn, is Torah Editor of The Jewish Press. He can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Q & A: Traveling And Missing Menorah Lighting (Part I)”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
IDF artillery fires on Gazan terrorists.
Two Soldiers Killed Overnight, Launchers Found Embedded Next to School
Latest Judaism Stories
PTI-071814

Perhaps, just perhaps, we can relate to this: whenever we feel distant from Hashem, that is the Churban.

Parshat Matot

Over the next 2 weeks covering portion Matot and Maasei, Rabbi Fohrman will bring order to confusion.

Lessons-Emunah-logo

Our home is in the center of the Holy Land, surrounded by (what else?) green hills and valleys.

Business-Halacha-logo

“Sound fine,” said Mrs. Schwartz. “In the middle, paint their names, Shoshana and Yehonasan. He spells his name Yehonasan with a hei and is very particular about it!”

Question: I recently returned from a trip abroad and wanted to say HaGomel. When I mentioned this to the officers of my synagogue, however, they told me – as per the instructions of the synagogue’s rabbi – that I would have to wait until Shabbos to do so. I was not given any reason for this and did not wish to display my ignorance, so I quietly acquiesced. Can you please explain why I had to wait?

Name Withheld
(Via E-Mail)

We may not recognize the adverse affect of eating forbidden foods, but they leave an indelible imprint.

There are several rules that one must adhere to when making a neder.

Important message for Jews in the Diaspora: In times of need run to Israel rather than from Israel.

The negotiation between Moses and the tribes of Reuven and Gad is a model of conflict resolution.

Once again we find ourselves alone – a little lamb among wolves.

When we return to our routines, things don’t have to go back to exactly the way they were.

The Three Weeks determines the “who we are and how we live” as Jews.

Sometimes when Chazal say that two different people are really one, they do not mean it literally, but rather figuratively.

The midrash says that Pinchas, (this parsha), and Eliyahu, prophet of Kings, are one and the same.

More Articles from Rabbi Yaakov Klass
Questions-Answers-logo

Question: I recently returned from a trip abroad and wanted to say HaGomel. When I mentioned this to the officers of my synagogue, however, they told me – as per the instructions of the synagogue’s rabbi – that I would have to wait until Shabbos to do so. I was not given any reason for this and did not wish to display my ignorance, so I quietly acquiesced. Can you please explain why I had to wait?

Name Withheld
(Via E-Mail)

Question: I recently returned from a trip abroad and wanted to say HaGomel. When I mentioned this to the officers of my synagogue, however, they told me – as per the instructions of the synagogue’s rabbi – that I would have to wait until Shabbos to do so. I was not given any reason for this and did not wish to display my ignorance, so I quietly acquiesced. Can you please explain why I had to wait?

Name Withheld
(Via E-Mail)

Question: I recently returned from a trip abroad and wanted to say HaGomel. When I mentioned this to the officers of my synagogue, however, they told me – as per the instructions of the synagogue’s rabbi – that I would have to wait until Shabbos to do so. I was not given any reason for this and did not wish to display my ignorance, so I quietly acquiesced. Can you please explain why I had to wait?

Name Withheld
(Via E-Mail)

Question: I recently returned from a trip abroad and wanted to say HaGomel. When I mentioned this to the officers of my synagogue, however, they told me – as per the instructions of the synagogue’s rabbi – that I would have to wait until Shabbos to do so. I was not given any reason for this and did not wish to display my ignorance, so I quietly acquiesced. Can you please explain why I had to wait?

Name Withheld
(Via E-Mail)

    Latest Poll

    Israel's Iron Dome Anti-Missile System:





    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/ask-the-rabbi/q-a-traveling-and-missing-menorah-lighting-part-i/2013/11/21/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: