web analytics
September 29, 2016 / 26 Elul, 5776
Judaism
Sponsored Post
The Migdal Ohr Mishpachton MISHPACHTONIM – Israel’s Children are Your Children.

Support Migdal Ohr by purchasing letters in the Torah Scroll that will be written in honor of Rabbi Grossman’s 70th Birthday.



‘Berov Am’ Vs. ‘Zerizim’ (Part II)


Printer-Ready Page Layout
Cohen-Rabbi-J-Simcha-NEW



Question: When performing a mitzvah, what is more important: doing it right away – “zerizim” – or doing it with a large crowd – “berov am”?

Answer: In Part I, based on Berachot 53a, we stated that “berov am” is more important. As such, on Friday night, the halacha should be that one person makes Kiddush for all present rather than everyone recite Kiddush for himself.

Interestingly, though, the Shulchan Aruch HaRav (Orach Chayim 213:6) writes that a person may recite Kiddush for himself. Although generally “berov am” is of supreme importance, Kiddush is an exception because listening to someone else’s Kiddush is like fulfilling a mitzvah through a shliach. And since Friday night Kiddush is a mitzvah min haTorah, one cannot compel a person to perform it through a shliach if he wishes to perform it himself.

And yet, perhaps even the Shulchan Aruch HaRav would agree that listening to Kiddush is better as long as one makes sure to say amen afterwards. I offer this suggestion based on the following:

The Rambam (Hilchot Berachot 1:11) rules that one may fulfill one’s obligation to recite a berachah by listening to someone else say it – even if one does not respond amen (as long as he intended to be included in the berachah). Moreover, he adds, whoever responds amen after a berachah is considered to have recited it himself.

The Kesef Mishnah was troubled by this halacha. If one can fulfill one’s obligation even without saying amen, why bother every saying amen? The Kesef Mishnah answers that if one says amen, he is considered to have said the berachah himself; if he doesn’t say amen, he is not. Instead, he has fulfilled his obligation via a shliach.

Therefore, perhaps even the Shulchan Aruch HaRav would agree that it is better to listen to Kiddush and fulfill “berov am” as long as one makes sure to say amen afterwards.

Rabbi J. Simcha Cohen

About the Author: Rabbi Cohen, a Jerusalem Prize recipient, is the author of eight sefarim on Jewish law. His latest, “Jewish Prayer the Right Way” (Urim Publications), is available at Amazon.com and select Judaica stores.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.




Imported and Older Comments:

to “‘Berov Am’ Vs. ‘Zerizim’ (Part II)”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
President Barack Obama
Obama Unites Congressional Democrats, Republicans, in Overriding Veto Damaging 9/11 Families

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/halacha-hashkafa/berov-am-vs-zerizim-part-ii/2014/03/13/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: