web analytics
July 7, 2015 / 20 Tammuz, 5775
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post


Daf Yomi


Daf-Yomi-logo

Enjoying A Hot Dish
‘What Was Really Meant Was Replacing It…’
(Shabbos 37a)

The Gemara states that even though Chananya would permit shehiyah (leaving partially cooked food on an open flame on Shabbos), he would prohibit chazarah unless the coals are garuf ve’katum (swept or covered).

Appearances’ Sake

Rashi (36b sv “aval lo tavshil”) indicates that chazarah is prohibited because it gives the impression to anyone watching that one wishes to cook the food further. Thus, he only permits doing so if the coals (or flame) are covered.

Stoking The Coals

The Ran (ad loc.) explains that Chananya’s concern with chazarah is similar to the rabbanan’s concern with shehiyah: namely, that one may to stoke the coals. (Nowadays, the equivalent would be moving a pot closer to the flame or raising the flame.) Chananya fears that when returning a pot to the flame, he may find that the pot has cooled off and will desire to stir the coals to help reheat it.

Thus, even if one accepts the lenient ruling of the Rema (Orach Chayim 253:2) who rules in accordance with Chananya, it is important to perform grifah and ketimah (covering or sweeping the coals) because many times pots have to be adjusted and moved closer to the fire. Also, occasionally one needs to lift a pot to remove some food and then replace it on the stove. Since such an act is considered chazarah, Chananya would only permit if the coals are garuf ve’katum.

The Blech

The Maharil (cited by Magen Avraham, Orach Chayim ad loc. sk31) maintains that placing a blech on a stove is the equivalent of ketumah (and gerufah) and thus permits leaving food on a blech-covered stove on Shabbos. This is the widely accepted minhag today (see Chayyei Adam 20:12; also Kisvei Rav Henkin, page 21, who rule accordingly).

What To Cover?

Rabbi Shimon Eider (Sefer Hilchos Shabbos note 961) cites Rabbi Aaron Kotler who says that covering the knobs on a stove or oven constitutes ketumah since it serves as a reminder not to raise the flame.

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe, Orach Chayim vol. 1, responsum 93) disagrees and asserts that the essence of ketumah is accomplished today by covering the flame, not the knobs controlling the flame. Why? Because, as the Ran explains, the whole point of ketumah is to make a hekker – a recognizable sign that one is only interested in letting the food simmer on its own but is uninterested in stoking the coals. Thus, only covering the flames constitutes ketumah, not covering the knobs. Nevertheless, Rabbi Feinstein advises people to cover the knobs as well. While using a blech demonstrates that one does not wish to cook, covering the knobs ensures that one does not do so.

This week’s Daf Yomi Highlights is based upon Al Hadaf, published by Cong. Al Hadaf, 17N Rigaud Rd., Spring Valley, NY 10977-2533. Al Hadaf published, semi-monthly, is available by subscription: U.S. – $40 per year; Canada – $54 per year; overseas – $65 per year. For dedication information, contact Rabbi Zev Dickstein, editor, at 845-356-9114 or visit Alhadafyomi.org.

About the Author: RABBI YAAKOV KLASS, rav of Congregation K’hal Bnei Matisyahu in Flatbush, Brooklyn, is Torah Editor of The Jewish Press. He can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com. RABBI GERSHON TANNENBAUM, rav of Congregation Bnai Israel of Linden Heights, Boro Park, Brooklyn, is the Director of Igud HaRabbanim – The Rabbinical Alliance of America.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Daf Yomi”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
George Soros: No friend of Israel
Hillary: George Soros is NO Friend of Israel
Latest Judaism Stories
17th_of_Tammuz_(medium)_(english)

17th of Tammuz: Beginning 3 weeks of mourning for the destruction of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.

Rabbi Avi Weiss

With Ruth, The Torah seems to be stating that children shouldn’t be punished for the sins of parents

Neihaus-070315

Without a foundation, one cannot hope to build a structure.

Torat-Hakehillah-logo-NEW

Why do we have a parsha in Sefer Shemos named after Yisro who was not only a former idolater, but actually served as a priest for Avodah Zarah!

Question: Should we wash our hands in the bathroom with soap and water, or by pouring water from a vessel with handles three times, alternating hands? I have heard it said that a vessel is used only in the morning upon awakening. What are the rules pertaining to young children? What is the protocol if no vessel is available? Additionally, may we dry our hands via an electric dryer?

Harry Koenigsberg
(Via E-Mail)

This Land Is ‘My’ Land
‘[If The Vow Was Imposed] In The Seventh Year…’
(Nedarim 42b)

The Shulchan Aruch in the very first siman states that one should rise in the morning like a lion, implying that simply rising form bed requires strength of a lion, in line with the Midrash.

Attempts to interpret the message of Hashem in the absence of divine prophecy ultimately may twist that message in unintended ways that can lead to calamitous events.

Suddenly, the pilot’s voice could be heard. He explained that this was a special day for those passengers on board who lived in Israel.

If the sick person is thrust into a situation where he is compelled to face his sickness head on, we who are not yet sick can encourage him by facing it with him.

All agree that Jews ARE different. How? Why? The Bible’s answer is surprising and profound.

What’s the nation of Israel’s purpose in the world? How we can bring God’s blessings into the world?

“Is there a difference between rescuing and other services?” asked Ploni.

To my dismay, I’ve seen that shidduch candidates with money become ALL desirable traits for marriage

Bil’am’s character is complex and nuanced; neither purely good nor purely evil.

More Articles from Rabbi Yaakov Klass and Rabbi Gershon Tannenbaum
Daf-Yomi-logo

This Land Is ‘My’ Land
‘[If The Vow Was Imposed] In The Seventh Year…’
(Nedarim 42b)

Daf-Yomi-logo

My Plate, My Food
‘My Loaf Is Forbidden To You’
(Nedarim 34b)

Not As An Asmachta?
“An Asmachta [In Beis Din] Does Acquire”
(Nedarim 27b)

Ulla’s Murderous Companion
‘Yes! Cut Him Even Deeper’
(Nedarim 22a)

An Enduring Text
‘If One Vows By The Torah…’
(Nedarim 14b)

Casting A Doubt
‘Shall We Say [They] Are Not Valid?’
(Nedarim 5a-7a)

The Honor Of Reading The Kesubah
‘Witnesses Sign Only After Reading…’
(Kesubos 109a)

Twice Promised
“Such And Such [I Give My Son]…”
(Kesubos 102b)

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/halacha-hashkafa/daf-yomi-50/2012/11/08/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: