web analytics
January 31, 2015 / 11 Shevat, 5775
 
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post


Laws And Customs Concerning Sefirah


In the movie “The Paper Chase,” a Harvard student rips out a page of the law report so that his fellow student will be unable to read it and will come to the lecture unprepared. About 2,000 years earlier a student lay feverishly ill in the academy of Rabbi Akiva in Bnei Brak. So caught up were the other students in the competitiveness of their learning that they found no time to visit him or take care of him. As the student lay dying, Rabbi Akiva himself entered the sick room, fed him, made him comfortable and swept the dust from the floor. The sick student survived. His peers did not.

Between Pesach and Shavuot, 24,000 of them died from diphtheria because they acted inconsiderately to one another. According to other sources, the students of Rabbi Akiva were massacred by the Romans after the murder of Rabbi Akiva himself. This was because they taught Torah in public, in violation of the Roman decree that forbade the study of all sacred texts.

The behavior of Rabbi Akiva’s students left them particulary vulnerable betweeen Pesach and Shavuot since this period is a time of celestial judgment. Furthermore, as Rabbi Goren points out, the Oral Torah, like the written Torah, could only be given when the Jews lived together in harmony. Accordingly, Rabbi Akiva’s students were not worthy of being the teachers of the Oral Law. The death of so many of Rabbi Akiva’s disciples threatened the very survival of the Oral Law. Only a few students survived to become the standard bearers of tradition. They were Rabbi Meir, Rabbi Yehuda, Rabbi Yose, Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochai and Rabbi Elazar Ben Shamua.

To commemorate this sad event, it has long been the custom to adopt certain forms of mourning on the days the students died. There is, however, a difference of opinion as to when the deaths occurred. According to the opinion of the Shulchan Aruch, they died during the 34 days immediately following Pesach, including the day of and the day following Lag B’Omer. Accordingly, one mourns for them from Pesach until daybreak following the day of Lag B’Omer. The Rema points out that because of the festivities of Lag B’Omer, all forms of mourning cease on Lag B’Omer itself.

As is usually the case, people of Sephardi origin follow the ruling of the Shulchan Aruch and do not shave or arrange weddings on Lag B’Omer. People of Ashkenazi origin do shave and arrange weddings on Lag B’Omer. Rav Ovadia Yosef rules that the authorities in Israel must determine the Sephardi or Ashkenazi origin of the couple before registering them for marriage on Lag B’Omer. In cases where the groom is Ashkenazi and the bride is Sephardi or vice versa, the custom of the groom is followed.

The second opinion is that of Tosafot. According to this opinion, no deaths occurred on the 16 days between Pesach and Shavuot, when Tachanun is not recited. Accordingly, there should be no mourning on the seven days of Pesach, the six days of Shabbat, the two days of Rosh Chodesh Iyar and on the day of Rosh Chodesh Sivan. According to the opinion of Tosafot, the thirty-three days of mourning commence only after Pesach and because there is no mourning on the sixteen days indicated, the mourning ends on Erev Shavuot.

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein points out that there are an additional three variations on the first opinion and one variation on the opinion of Tosafot, namely that of the Ari, who mourned for the students from Pesach through to Shavuot without any break. The period of mourning that one observes depends on the custom of the community to which one belongs.

The forms of mourning that are observed are not shaving, not taking a haircut, not attending weddings and not listening to music. According to one opinion, one may listen to recorded music when Jewish music with words from the scriptures is being played. In former times, people would also cease all work after nightfall in commemoration of the funerals of the students that took place at night. Engagements and engagement parties are permitted during the sefirah period. The mohel, the father of the child and the sandek may shave in honor of a brit ceremony during the sefirah period.

About the Author: Raphael Grunfeld’s book, “Ner Eyal on Seder Moed” (distributed by Mesorah) is available at OU.org and your local Jewish bookstore. His new book, “Ner Eyal on Seder Nashim & Nezikin,” will be available shortly.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Laws And Customs Concerning Sefirah

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
A poster in Gaza showing Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi and Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh, shortly after Morsi's election in 2012.
Egypt Designates Hamas a Terrorist Organization
Latest Judaism Stories
Staum-013015

People often think that all they are missing is “just a little more” and then they can be truly happy.

Torah-Hakehillah-121914

The Midrash is teaching a fundamental message of what it means to be a religious person.

Rabbi Sacks

Torah opposes slavery; G-d desires the free worship of free human beings, yet slavery’s permitted-?!

Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis

France allowed Islamists to flourish despite their loyalty to Islamic sharia law not French values

Approximately 18 years ago, my uncle called me into his office saying he had an urgent matter to discuss. I didn’t know what he had in mind.

“Where is God?” asked the Kotzker Rebbe “God is not everywhere but only where you let Him enter”

An Explosion In The Trench
‘With A Glowing Hot Knife’
(Yevamos 120b)

Her first tactic was tefillah; she immediately began to recite one perek after another of Tehillim.

When a miracle occurs that transcends nature, Hashem has broken the laws of nature to create the miracle.

“How could you have expected my glasses to be there?” argued Mr. Weiss. “You shouldn’t have to pay.”

Rather than submit to this fate and suffer torture and humiliation, Shaul decided to fall on his sword.

How can the Da’as Zekeinim say this was Hashem’s plan to allow them to become the Torah Nation? We know it was actually a punishment.

A strange midrash of fruit trees surrounding the Nation of Israel as they walked to freedom

Leading by example must be visible, regarding where, when and how-like Nachshon entering the Red Sea

Rabbi Yaakov Nagen, a Ram at Yeshivat Otniel, notes that the verse is suggesting that retelling the story of the Exodus is so important that Hashem is performing ever-greater miracles specifically so that parents can tell their stories to future generations.

More Articles from Raphael Grunfeld
Grunfeld-Raphael-logo

A more difficult situation arises when there is no evidence placing the missing husband at the site of the death.

Grunfeld-Raphael-logo

The court cannot solely rely on death certificates issued by non-Jewish institutions without conducting its own investigation into the facts of the case.

When the inability cannot be clearly attributed to either spouse, the halacha is the subject of debate among the Rishonim.

The child of a Jewish mother from a union with a non-Jewish father is not a mamzer.

Although the conversion ceremony involves more than circumcision and immersion, these are the two essential requirements, without which the conversion is ineffective.

If a man dies childless, the Torah commands the deceased’s brother to marry his brother’s widow in a ceremony known as yibum, or to perform a special form of divorce ceremony with her known as chalitzah.

What if, at the moment of the late brother’s death, the surviving brother cannot effect yibum because the widow is a niddah?

The Torah lists twenty-one close relatives a man may not marry.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/halacha-hashkafa/laws-and-customs-concerning-sefirah/2013/04/17/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: