web analytics
October 22, 2014 / 28 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post
Meir Panim with Soldiers 5774 Roundup: Year of Relief and Service for Israel’s Needy

Meir Panim implements programs that serve Israel’s neediest populations with respect and dignity. Meir Panim also coordinated care packages for families in the South during the Gaza War.



Out Of Luck

Business-Halacha-logo

Kollel Toras Rashbi organized an event for Lag B’Omer evening – learning, Zohar reading, a bonfire, inspirational singing and a midnight meal.

In addition, there was a limited raffle for a plane ticket to Israel, to visit R. Shimon b. Yochai’s kever in Meiron. “Only 100 raffle tickets will be sold,” the sign read. “$25 and you might be at Meiron next year!”

Toward the end of the meal, Mr. Simon, the director of the kollel, announced: “And now, the raffle to Meiron!” He put the raffle tickets into a box, mixed them around and pulled out a name. “Mr. Strass!” He declared. “Enjoy next year in Meiron!”

While Mr. Strass was being congratulated, Yankel noticed a card lying on the floor. He picked it up. It was a raffle ticket belonging to Hillel that had accidentally fallen and had not been placed in the box.

“Hold it!” Yankel said to Mr. Simon. “There’s a raffle ticket belonging to Hillel that was not in the box.”

Mr. Simon examined the raffle ticket. “You’re right,” he said to Yankel. “Hillel was left out inadvertently.”

Mr. Simon asked Hillel to come over. “We’ll refund your money,” Mr. Simon said to him.

“I don’t want that,” objected Hillel. “I want a fair chance at the plane ticket. If the raffle was erroneous, you’ll have to redo it!”

Mr. Strass overheard the discussion. “I’m willing to share the prize with you,” he offered Hillel. “I’ll give you $100; it’s much better for you than the one percent chance of winning if we redo the raffle.”

Hillel thought for a minute. “OK, deal” he said. “Leave it as is,” he said to Mr. Simon.

Yankel complained, though. “The lottery was not done properly,” he said. “It’s got to be redone.”

“What’s wrong?” Mr. Strass said to him. “Hillel doesn’t mind. You didn’t lose out. If anything, your chances were higher because Hillel was left out!”

“Nonetheless,” said Yankel, “the lottery was erroneous and needs to be redone.”

“Rabbi Dayan is sitting here with us,” Mr. Simon said. “Let’s ask him.”

“Hillel’s name was omitted from the raffle,” Mr. Simon said to Rabbi Dayan. “The winner is willing to settle with him, but another participant wants to invalidate the lottery entirely. Must it be redone?”

“If the lottery was done improperly, it is null and void,” replied Rabbi Dayan. “Any participant can insist that it be redone.”

“What is the source for this?” asked Mr. Strauss.

“The Gemara [B.B. 106b] teaches that if two brothers divided their inheritance through a lottery, and a third, unknown brother arrived later, the lottery is null and void,” answered Rabbi Dayan. “They need to divide again through a new lottery. The Shulchan Aruch rules, moreover, based on Tosfos, that this is true even if there were three fields. Each brother initially took one field and half of the third, and now the new brother received the third field through the lottery. The two brothers can insist on redoing the lottery also on the other two fields, even though the share of third brother does not affect those fields.” (C.M. 175:3)

“How does that apply here?” asked Mr. Simon.

“The Chavos Yair applied this ruling also to our case, where a name is omitted from the raffle,” explained Rabbi Dayan. “Any participant can invalidate the lottery, even though he has no direct loss to claim that the lottery be redone on account of the mistake. The same is true if someone’s name is entered twice, whether that person won or not. Other authorities concur with this ruling.” (See Pischei Teshuvah, C.M. 175:1; Pischei Choshen, Kinyanim 21:32)

About the Author: Rabbi Meir Orlian is a faculty member of the Business Halacha Institute, headed by HaRav Chaim Kohn, a noted dayan. To receive BHI’s free newsletter, Business Weekly, send an e-mail to subscribe@businesshalacha.com. For questions regarding business halacha issues, or to bring a BHI lecturer to your business or shul, call the confidential hotline at 877-845-8455 or e-mail ask@businesshalacha.com.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Out Of Luck”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon walks through a Hamas terror tunnel from Gaza to Israel.
IDF Checks for Terror Tunnel Threat in Northern Israel
Latest Judaism Stories
Noah and his Family; mixed media collage by Nathan Hilu. Courtesy Hebrew Union College Museum

Myth #1: It is easy to be a B’nai Noach. It is extraordinarily hard to be a B’nai Noach.

God-and the world

The creation of the world is described twice. Each description serves a unique purpose.

Questions-Answers-logo

Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

Name Withheld

Lessons-in-Emunah-new

To the surprise of our protectzia-invested acquaintances, my family has thrived in our daled amos without that amenity, b’ezras Hashem.

Shimon started adjusting the branches on the roof. In doing so, a branch fell off the other side of the car and hit the side-view mirror, cracking it.

I, the one who is housed inside this body, am completely and utterly spiritual.

Should we sit in the sukkah on a day that may be the eighth day when we are not commanded to sit in the sukkah at all?

For Appearance’s Sake
‘Shammai Did Not Follow Their Own Ruling’
(Yevamos 13b 14a)

If one hurts another human being, God is hurt; if one brings joy to another, God is more joyous.

I’m grateful to Hashem for everything; Just the same, I’d love a joyous Yom Tov without aggravation.

Bereshit: Life includes hard choices that challenge our decisions, leaving lingering complications.

Rabbi Fohrman:” Great evils are often wrought by those who are blithely unaware of the power they wield.”

The emphasis on choice, freedom and responsibility is a most distinctive features of Jewish thought.

The Torah emphasizes the joy of Sukkot, for after a season of labor, we celebrate our prosperity.

The encounter with the timeless stability of the divine occurs within the Sukkot.

More Articles from Rabbi Meir Orlian
Business-Halacha-logo

Shimon started adjusting the branches on the roof. In doing so, a branch fell off the other side of the car and hit the side-view mirror, cracking it.

Business-Halacha-logo

Some seforim on a nearby bookcase toppled over and knocked the esrog out of Lev’s hand. It fell to the ground and a piece broke off.

Mr. Fisher contacted Rabbi Dayan. “Am I allowed to use money of ma’aser kesafim to pay the shul for an aliyah that I bought?” he asked.

Rabbi Dayan took a challah and some cooked eggs. He then called over his 15-year-old son, Aharon. “Could you please ask your friend Chaim from next door to come over and help me with the eruv tavshilin?”

When the Kleins returned, however, they were dismayed to see that the renters did a poor job cleaning up after themselves.

“Tony said that the code in most places in the U.S. is at least 36 inches for a residential guardrail,” replied Mr. Braun. “Some make it higher, 42, or even 52 inches for high porches. What is the required height according to halacha?”

“The Torah states in Parshat Ki-Teitzei: ‘If you build a new house, you shall make a fence for your roof. I think it’s your responsibility.”

On Friday afternoon, Dov called Kalman. “Please make sure to return the keys for the car on Motzaei Shabbos,” he said. “We have a bris on Sunday morning and we’re all going. We also need the roof luggage bag.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/halacha-hashkafa/out-of-luck/2014/05/16/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: