web analytics
October 24, 2014 / 30 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post
Meir Panim with Soldiers 5774 Roundup: Year of Relief and Service for Israel’s Needy

Meir Panim implements programs that serve Israel’s neediest populations with respect and dignity. Meir Panim also coordinated care packages for families in the South during the Gaza War.



Ransom Loan

Business-Halacha-logo

Moshe and Yosef were vacationing in Mexico. One morning Yosef went out to buy some food while Moshe remained in the hotel. “I’ll be back in an hour,” Yosef said. “Later today we can go touring.”

An hour later, Moshe received a frantic call from Yosef. “I was kidnapped!” he cried. “They’re demanding that you transfer $250,000 by midnight to a foreign account, or else… I’m texting the account details.”

Moshe alerted the authorities and waited tensely, hoping that this was just a hoax. He tried contacting Yosef again in the afternoon, but the phone was disconnected. As the day wore on and Yosef did not return, Moshe grew increasingly concerned about Yosef’s life. He considered how he could get the ransom money. He approached a wealthy Mexican Jewish businessman.

“I will lend you the money,” replied the businessman, “but I want you to sign that you will repay.”

The frantic sound of Yosef’s voice was still ringing in Moshe’s ears. “Whatever I have to do,” he said. He signed a loan form for the stated sum, and the businessman transferred the $250,000 for the ransom that evening.

Moshe could not sleep all night, waiting to hear the sound of Yosef knocking on the door.

At 6 a.m., Moshe finally heard a knock. He jumped to the door, “Who is it?” he asked.

“It’s me, Yosef!” was the reply. “I’m back!”

Moshe opened the door and embraced Yosef. “I’m so relieved to see you alive!” he said.

“So am I!” replied Yosef, still in a daze. “I’ve never been so terrified in my life!”

After he calmed down a little, Yosef asked, “Where did you get the ransom money from?”

“I was able to borrow it from a local Jewish businessman,” said Moshe. “He made me sign that I would pay him back.”

“I feel I should pay,” said Yosef, “but I don’t have anything like that sum. My family also is in debt.”

“I was assuming you’d somehow cover the loan,” said Moshe. “If you can’t pay – I’m in trouble!”

“Maybe you don’t have to repay the loan,” suggested Yosef, “since you only borrowed the money to save my life.”

“We need to contact Rabbi Dayan,” said Moshe.

Moshe called Rabbi Dayan and related the unfortunate details. “Do I have to repay the loan?” he asked. “Does Yosef have to reimburse me? What if doesn’t have that sum, does he owe me in the future?”

“You are liable for the loan and Yosef is required to reimburse you,” replied Rabbi Dayan. “If he doesn’t have that sum, there is a dispute whether he owes you in the future.”

“Can you please elaborate?” asked Moshe.

“Rav Moshe Feinstein was asked about the Bobover Rebbe who borrowed money during the Holocaust to save European Jewry,” replied Rabbi Dayan. “He ruled that he is liable to repay the loan, even though it was to save the lives of others.”(Igros Moshe C.M. 2:63)

“What about Yosef’s liability to reimburse me?” asked Moshe.

“The Gemara [Sanhedrin 73a] derives from the verse lo sa’amod al dam rei’echa – you shall not stand by while your brother’s blood is shed – that one is required to lay out money to rescue his fellow Jew,” said Rabbi Dayan. “The Rosh, cited by the Tur [C.M. 426], adds that the rescued person has to reimburse him, since one is not obligated to save another with his own money when the rescued person is able to pay. The Rama similarly writes regarding pidyon shevuyim [redeeming captives] that the captive has to reimburse if he has funds.” (Y.D. 252:12)

“What if he does not have funds at that time?” asked Yosef. “Is he required to pay later?”

About the Author: Rabbi Meir Orlian is a faculty member of the Business Halacha Institute, headed by HaRav Chaim Kohn, a noted dayan. To receive BHI’s free newsletter, Business Weekly, send an e-mail to subscribe@businesshalacha.com. For questions regarding business halacha issues, or to bring a BHI lecturer to your business or shul, call the confidential hotline at 877-845-8455 or e-mail ask@businesshalacha.com.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Ransom Loan”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Miniature Torah at the women's section of the Western Wall Friday morning.
Women of the Wall Smuggle Tiny Torah Scroll to Western Wall
Latest Judaism Stories
Rapps-Rabbi-Joshua-logo

Shem realized that he owed his existence to his father who brought him into the world.

Daf-Yomi-logo

Law-Abiding Citizen
‘That Which Is Crooked Cannot Be Made Straight…’
(Yevamos 22a-b)

Weck-110411-Noah

The flood was not sent to destroy, but to restore the positive potential of the world.

Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

Name Withheld

Why is there is no mention of dinosaurs, and other prehistoric animals, in the Torah?

Strict din demands perfection. There is no room for shortcomings and no place for excuses; you are responsible.

Surprisingly, my husband and one son arrived home over half-an-hour earlier than usual. I excitedly shared my perfect-timing story, but my better half one upped me easily.

Noach felt a tug, and then heard a rip. His jacket had been caught on the nail, and the beautiful suit had a tear.

Boundaries must be set in every home. Parents and children are not pals. They are not equals.

Noah and his wife could not fathom living together as husband and wife and continuing the human race

The Babel story is the 2nd in a 4-act drama that’s unmistakably a connecting thread of Bereishit

Our intentions are critical in raising children because they mimic everything we parents do & think

A humble person who achieves a position of prominence will utilize the standing to benefit others.

Myth #1: It is easy to be a B’nai Noach. It is extraordinarily hard to be a B’nai Noach.

The creation of the world is described twice. Each description serves a unique purpose.

More Articles from Rabbi Meir Orlian
Business-Halacha-logo

Noach felt a tug, and then heard a rip. His jacket had been caught on the nail, and the beautiful suit had a tear.

Business-Halacha-logo

Shimon started adjusting the branches on the roof. In doing so, a branch fell off the other side of the car and hit the side-view mirror, cracking it.

Some seforim on a nearby bookcase toppled over and knocked the esrog out of Lev’s hand. It fell to the ground and a piece broke off.

Mr. Fisher contacted Rabbi Dayan. “Am I allowed to use money of ma’aser kesafim to pay the shul for an aliyah that I bought?” he asked.

Rabbi Dayan took a challah and some cooked eggs. He then called over his 15-year-old son, Aharon. “Could you please ask your friend Chaim from next door to come over and help me with the eruv tavshilin?”

When the Kleins returned, however, they were dismayed to see that the renters did a poor job cleaning up after themselves.

“Tony said that the code in most places in the U.S. is at least 36 inches for a residential guardrail,” replied Mr. Braun. “Some make it higher, 42, or even 52 inches for high porches. What is the required height according to halacha?”

“The Torah states in Parshat Ki-Teitzei: ‘If you build a new house, you shall make a fence for your roof. I think it’s your responsibility.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/halacha-hashkafa/ransom-loan/2014/08/07/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: