Photo Credit:

“Nonetheless, the fare in a taxi is based on distance traveled and time elapsed,” replied Rabbi Dayan. “The exact job and its fare are not predetermined; they depend on the route the cab takes and traffic conditions. The only agreement is that the price should reflect the meter reading; each unit is considered a separate hiring. Thus, even though you initially asked for a trip home, you are entitled to stop anywhere that you wish.” (D’var Chok U’mishpat, p. 245)

Advertisement

1
2
SHARE
Previous articleStopRedBill.Com Subway Ad Campaign
Next articleFruit At The End Of A Meal
Rabbi Meir Orlian is a faculty member of the Business Halacha Institute, headed by HaRav Chaim Kohn, a noted dayan. To receive BHI’s free newsletter, Business Weekly, send an e-mail to subscribe@businesshalacha.com. For questions regarding business halacha issues, or to bring a BHI lecturer to your business or shul, call the confidential hotline at 877-845-8455 or e-mail ask@businesshalacha.com.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Let me add another factor: Taxi fares take into account the occasional traffic jam which is so bad that one is better off walking the rest of the way to one's destination. Thus, the quick, uneventful ride is counterbalanced by nightmares such as this. On the other hand, a flat rate ride is just that. The only exception would be if the cab broke down, which isn't the case here.

Loading Facebook Comments ...