Although kashering and toveling are sometimes required for the same utensil, they are fundamentally different procedures, serving different purposes. Kashering is the process required to expel the flavor of forbidden foods from the utensil’s surfaces and is therefore inapplicable to a utensil which has never been used. Toveling is required for a utensil (even unused) manufactured by, or acquired from a non- Jew. A utensil manufactured and used by a non-Jew or used by a non-Jew and purchased by a Jew requires both kashering and toveling.

Advertisement

1
2
SHARE
Previous articleWhy A Bread Blessing On The festival Of Matzahs?
Next articleIsrael Winning War against the Locusts
Raphael Grunfeld received semicha in Yoreh Yoreh from Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem of America and in Yadin Yadin from Maran Hagaon Harav Dovid Feinstein, Shlitah. A partner at the Wall Street law firm of Carter Ledyard & Milburn LLP, where he specializes in cross-border mergers and acquisitions, Raphael is the author of “Ner Eyal, a Guide to Seder Nashim, Nezikin, Kodashim, Taharot and Zerayim” (2016) and “Ner Eyal, a Guide to the Laws of Shabbat and Festivals in Seder Moed” (2001), both of which are available for purchase at https://www.amazon.com/dp/057816731X Questions for the author can be sent to rafegrunfeld@gmail.com