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August 28, 2015 / 13 Elul, 5775
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A Very Hong Kong Chanukah


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There is an inherent irony that this very free and very public expression of Jewish pride and joy occurs under the Chinese flag in Hong Kong. A debate about whether this celebration brings religion into a public sphere is noticeably absent. And, there is no public Christmas lighting to compete with.

Our very Hong Kong Chanukah is certainly a multimedia spectacle of traditional songs set to uber-modern tunes. An even broader cross-section of this diverse community than I ever knew existed is not just present but actively participates. Beneath the imposing evening shadows of the HSBC building our merry group lives in the moment of pure uninhibited joy. This is big Jewish pride in a very public way.

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Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/holidays/a-very-hong-kong-chanukah/2011/12/23/

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