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April 19, 2015 / 30 Nisan, 5775
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Them and Us

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Photo Credit: Yonatan Sindel

Assimilation, the Tal-law, the social demonstrations, the morality or lack-thereof of Israeli politicians, kids that have went “off the derech” and [sadly] more, are not “their” issues but rather-ours. These are not just news-items that are interesting/provocative [as they must be to make the “news”] but rather are our issues. The above occurrences are happening to the Jewish people and therefore, when referring to the above, it would both suitable, and perhaps even obligatory, to start changing the term “them” to “us.”

If we want these days to transform from fasts to feasts, we need to start fixing the reality in which we live. None of us can solve the world’s problems, but 1 small step we can make to eradicate the “Sin’at Chi’nam”/Senseless hatred that seems to still be a reality [see Rambam above;” and they shall be a reminder to our wrong/evil ways, and those of our forbears, that were like our own today, which has/had resulted to them and to us in these tragedies…”] – let’s start talking like 1 nation.

So today, as you feel hungry and thirsty, and perhaps upset that a beautiful Sunday can’t be used for too much, do feel distracted! Leave the monopoly on the shelf, and while reading the paper or hearing the news about your fellow Jews, please don’t allow the word “them” to be uttered.

About the Author: Rabbi Yehoshua Grunstein is Director of training and placement at The Straus-Amiel Institute at Ohr Torah Stone.


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