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April 19, 2015 / 30 Nisan, 5775
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My Personal Shofar Blower


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The story, however, does not end with Rosh Hashanah. In 1996 Uri’s daughter and son-in-law were killed in a terrorist attack. Fortunately, their two children were unharmed, and Uri and his wife Yehudit adopted them.

Uri was well known in Israel as one of the editors of the Talmudic Encyclopedia and for his contributions to Machon Tzomet, the creator of halachic solutions for modern technological problems. In May 2011 Uri was killed in a traffic accident right near his home.

For me, he will always be remembered as my personal shofar blower and as the one who saved my Rosh Hashanah.

May Uri’s name be remembered for a blessing, and may we all be remembered in the Book of Life this coming New Year!

About the Author: Rabbi Zalman Eisenstock, author of “Psalms: An Eternal Treasure,” is a freelance writer and educator living in Efrat, Israel. He can be contacted at zalmaneisenstock@gmail.com.


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One Response to “My Personal Shofar Blower”

  1. Anonymous says:

    For full explanation of Shofar, its influence on prayer and its historical antecedents going back to the Temple sacrifices,
    go to: https://sites.google.com/site/shofarwebpage/.

Comments are closed.

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