web analytics
September 2, 2014 / 7 Elul, 5774
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post
Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat (L) visits the JewishPress.com booth at The Event. And the Winners of the JewishPress.com Raffle Are…

Congratulations to all the winners of the JewishPress.com raffle at The Event



The Gates Of Righteousness


Lessons-logo

We live in a world that is often too cruel and unkind. Living in Israel for the last 30 years, I have attended too many funerals for those whose lives were taken through incomprehensible acts of terror. During the years of the second intifada there were many days that I found it impossible to continue teaching, as a student would burst into my classroom and announce that there had been another terrorist attack. How could I just go on with a regular lesson when lives were lost?

Throughout those years, other images stood out in my mind. There were the scenes of emergency caregivers, doctors and nurses who valiantly saved the lives of the wounded – many times performing what seemed like miracles when all hope was lost. One of those places where these seeming miracles took place was Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem. The hospital head, Professor Jonathan HaLevi, was often interviewed on Israeli television and asked about the condition of the wounded.

On a personal level Shaare Zedek, its doctors and nurses were responsible for saving my life after I had been diagnosed with bacterial endocarditis. I had entered the hospital with a lingering fever and stomach virus, and all I can remember was my wish just to feel better. The night before I went to the ER, I became more concerned when I was barely able to stand up on my own and felt chills all over my body.

At the hospital I was immediately given two IVs as I was severely dehydrated. And after taking many different tests, it had still not been determined what the main problem was. Then, on the following day, when I was given a special test whereby a tube was placed in my mouth, I remember the doctors looking at the computer screen and saying they saw bacterial growth in my heart. The only courses of action were to do open-heart surgery to replace my mitral valve that had been destroyed, and to start IV antibiotics. The heavy dose of antibiotics was referred to as a “cocktail.” After the very successful three-hour operation, I remained in the ICU for another 10 days – with at least 10 different wires attached to my body.

One of my recollections from that very difficult period was being confined to my bed, not being allowed to get up and move around. There was a male nurse, an Arab, who dutifully bathed me every day. Here we were, a caregiver and a patient, not two enemies but rather one helping to improve my quality of life while I gladly accepted it. Many nurses and doctors examined me for an entire month, taking my blood and administering test after test. They were young and old, Jew and Arab, paid workers and volunteers. They were all working for one goal: the preservation of life. A great lesson indeed for all to practice!

After a month at Shaare Zedek I was allowed to go home, but my actual recovery period would be slow and arduous. I would be a heart patient for life, with a pacemaker that needed to be checked every six months. I would take occasional blood tests and would always have to take a blood thinner. But I would say with great kavanah the words of the Modim prayer: “for Your miracles that You perform every day.”

Most recently my family and I renewed our connections with Shaare Zedek. I wasn’t the patient; my mother-in-law was. Last July she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, one of the most serious kinds of cancer. The entire family was expecting the worst, but my mother-in-law has great strengths, some of which I never knew. She continues her daily activities, attending lectures for seniors, shopping and attending shul every Shabbat. And during this period we have had the opportunity to share more meals together and enjoy each other’s company.

Every week my wife and her sisters take turns going to the hospital for my mother-in-law’s chemo treatments. It is a very special ward with very loving and concerned nurses and doctors. Last Chanukah, the oncologist recommended that my mother-in-law have a CT in order to check the status of the cancer. While we waited for what seemed like an endless amount of time, a group of children was visiting sick patients and singing Chanukah songs. Chanukah is the holiday that recalls the miracles of old; we were hoping and praying for a miracle right now.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “The Gates Of Righteousness”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Police set up roadblocks throughout the Sharon region and beyond to track down terrorists believed to have infiltrated the area.
Palestinian Arab Terrorist Attack Foiled Near Netanya
Latest Judaism Stories
shofar+kotel

If you had an important court date scheduled – one that would determine your financial future, or even your very life – you’d be sure to prepare for weeks beforehand. On Rosh Hashanah, each individual is judged on the merit of his deeds. Whether he will live out the year or not. Whether he will […]

The_United_Nations_Building

It is in the nature of the Nations of the World to be hostile towards the Jewish People.

Taste-of-Lomdus-logo

First, how could a beis din of 23 judges present a guilty verdict in a capital punishment case? After all, only a majority of the 23 judges ruled in favor of his verdict.

Of paramount importance is that both the king and his people realize that while he is the leader, he is still a subject of God.

Untimely News
‘A Mourner Is Forbidden To Wear Shoes…’
(Mo’ed Katan 20b)

Question: The Gemara in Berachot states that the sages authored our prayers. Does that mean we didn’t pray beforehand?

Menachem
Via Email

When a person feels he can control the destiny of other people, he runs the risk of feeling self-important, significant, and mighty.

Needless to say, it was done and they formed a great relationship as his friend and mentor. He started attending services and volunteered his time all along putting on tefillin.

He took me to a room filled with computer equipment and said, “You pray here for as long as you want.” I couldn’t believe my ears.

On Friday afternoon, Dov called Kalman. “Please make sure to return the keys for the car on Motzaei Shabbos,” he said. “We have a bris on Sunday morning and we’re all going. We also need the roof luggage bag.”

On Chol HaMoed some work is prohibited and some is permitted. According to some opinions, the work prohibition is biblical; according to others, it’s rabbinical.

If there is a mitzvas minuy dayanim in the Diaspora, then why is there a difference between Israel and the Diaspora in the number of judges and their distribution?

Judaism is a religion of love but also a religion of justice, for without justice, love corrupts.

The time immediately preceding Mashiach’s arrival is likened to the birth pangs of a woman in labor.

More Articles from Name Withheld Upon Request
Lessons-logo

There is not even a shadow of doubt that without Agudat Efrat’s help, this child would not have been born.

Lessons-061413

The highway was packed with bumper-to-bumper traffic, and there I sat with hands gripped tightly on the steering wheel, begging the cars to move. My heart swelled at the thought of seeing my son, who was just coming back from his year of learning in Eretz Yisrael. How I had missed him! Though I was used to him being away (if you can ever really get used to a child being away), a special space in my heart was empty – as I waited for him.

We live in a world that is often too cruel and unkind. Living in Israel for the last 30 years, I have attended too many funerals for those whose lives were taken through incomprehensible acts of terror. During the years of the second intifada there were many days that I found it impossible to continue teaching, as a student would burst into my classroom and announce that there had been another terrorist attack. How could I just go on with a regular lesson when lives were lost?

Once a week or so some of my friends and I get together for activities and a little socializing. Over time I have gone through some personal changes and growth, and I sometimes feel out of place with these girls, some of whom I have known for years. I experienced a real struggle during a recent get-together that will surely have a long-lasting impact on me.

The Schwartzes had three vehicles but only two drivers. At any given time the third vehicle, the 2005 red Ford van, could be seen on different driveways throughout the neighborhood – and sometimes even in Miami Beach and Hollywood, Florida. The Schwartzes kept a third vehicle, knowing that not everyone had a car.

In 2001, the year of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, my husband and I were both in mourning for close relatives. As a woman, I did not have the responsibility of attending a minyan to recite Kaddish. So I never realized how complicated it could get.

Note to readers: When I heard the words, “You give us seven minutes and we’ll give you the world” on the radio at 6:30 a.m. on Wednesday morning, July 13, I never thought that what I was about to hear would shake me to the core and change my world forever. I could not come to myself – and I’m sure most of klal Yisraelcouldn’t either. So I sat down and the following poem spilled forth. Because it is written in a simple style, simple enough for any child to understand, I hope it does not seem to trivialize what happened; it is just my humble reaction to an earth-shattering event.

My husband of 40 years is always ready to help people. He is also very kind to his family and is always eager to embark on a family outing. However, he has one stipulation. He would rather not drive long distances at night, as he has had challenging experiences driving in the dark in fog, rain and other inclement weather.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/jewish-columns/lessons-in-emunah/the-gates-of-righteousness/2013/04/04/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: