web analytics
July 30, 2015 / 14 Av, 5775
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post


The Lost Siddur

Lessons-logo

When my very busy friend and former neighbor called to say, “I have a story to tell you,” I knew it had to be a good one. I wasn’t disappointed.

The story involved her husband, who teaches in the same yeshiva as my husband. They are good friends from our old neighborhood and meet daily over lunch.

Rav S., she recounted, was traveling back from attending a wedding in Toronto and had a stopover in Frankfurt, Germany. With plenty of time for morning prayers between connecting flights, he reached into his carry-on bag for his siddur. When his initial search surprisingly proved futile, he began a more thorough search that likewise produced nothing. With a quick glance around and no landsman in sight from whom to borrow a siddur, he decided to begin saying the prayers by memory.

He was doing fine until he got to an uncommon addition and found himself a bit stuck. There he was in the midst of a stalled tefillah and unclear of his next move when an airline employee approached him and said, “Excuse me, but we found this book and we don’t know what to do with it. You look like someone who might know what to do with it.” Rav S. smiled and made as much a sign of acknowledgement (an mmming sound) and appreciation to the clueless attendant as was possible in the midst of reciting his tefillah.

Overjoyed with this perfectly timed turn of events that made for a convenient resumption of his prayer, he opened the siddur and glanced at what was written in the inside cover: Eliyahu Kalman Estrin.

With that conclusion to her tale, my heart skipped a beat because that’s my son’s name!

We were as unaware of Rav S.’s trip as he was of ours. My husband had taken our boys to Vancouver to visit family and had likewise stopped over in Frankfurt a few weeks earlier. One of the first things I heard when they walked in the door was: “Eliyahu lost his siddur on the plane.” It couldn’t have been easier; my husband retrieved the lost siddur the very next day in yeshiva over breakfast.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “The Lost Siddur

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
Dore Gold.
Foreign Ministry Calls Sunni Arab Nations ‘Israel’s Allies’
Latest Judaism Stories
011-OT-Maps-Israel-Tribes

One must view the settlement of Israel in a positive light. Thinking otherwise is a grievous sin.

Vaetchanan

Reaching a stronger understanding of what Moses actually did to prevent him from entering the land

Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis

Anti-Zionism, today’s anti-Semitism, has gone viral, tragically supported globally & by many Jews

The 10 Statements main point was not content but the encounter between G-d & His nation, Israel

Before going in, I had told R’ Nachum all of the things we were doing in Philly, and how it was very important to receive a good bracha on behalf of our newest venture, a Russian Kollel.

Question: When a stranger approaches a congregant in shul asking for tzedakah, should the congregant verify that the person’s need is genuine? Furthermore, what constitutes tzedakah? Is a donation to a synagogue, yeshiva, or hospital considered tzedakah?

Zvi Kirschner
(Via E-Mail)

(JNi.media) Tisha B’Av (Heb: 9th of the month of Av) is a fast day according to rabbinic law and tradition, commemorating the destruction of the First Temple in 586 BCE by the army of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, and the destruction of the Second Temple in the year 70 CE by the Roman army led […]

Devarim often parallels the stories in Bereishit but in reverse & can be considered as a corrective

‘Older’ By A Month
‘…Until The Beginning Of Adar’
(Nedarim 63a)

We realize how much we miss something only after it’s gone.

Because the words of Torah gladden the heart, studying Torah is forbidden when Tisha B’Av is on a weekday, except for passages in Scripture that deal with the destruction of the Temple and other calamities.

On Super Bowl Sunday itself, life seems to stop. Over one hundred million people watch the game. About half of the households in the country show it in their living rooms and dens.

Moses begins Sefer Devarim reviewing much of the 40 years in the desert & why he can’t enter Israel

While they are definitely special occurrences, why are they cause for a new holiday?

Torah wasn’t given to be kept in Sinai; Brooklyn or Beverly Hills-It was meant to be kept in Israel!

More Articles from Dena Estrin
Lessons-logo

When my very busy friend and former neighbor called to say, “I have a story to tell you,” I knew it had to be a good one. I wasn’t disappointed.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/jewish-columns/lessons-in-emunah/the-lost-siddur-2/2014/01/09/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: