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May 6, 2015 / 17 Iyar, 5775
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The Yellow Star


Lessons-042012

It is hard to believe that after almost 70 years following the end of World War II, we are still gathering testimony from survivors. But the work must go on. The names of loved ones cannot be forgotten in the sands of time. As Zelda Schneerson Mishkovsky, a descendant of the third Lubavitcher Rebbe and a poet, wrote in Every Man has a Name:

“Every man has a name/ Given him by G-d/ And given by his father and his mother./ Every man has a name/ Given him by his stature and his way of smiling.”

The Central Bureau of Shoah Victims’ Names is accessible at www.yadvashem.org. For assistance in filling out Pages of Testimony, e-mail Names.memory@yadvashem.org.il or call 972-2-6443239.

About the Author: Rabbi Zalman Eisenstock, author of “Psalms: An Eternal Treasure,” is a freelance writer and educator living in Efrat, Israel. He can be contacted at zalmaneisenstock@gmail.com.


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