web analytics
May 28, 2015 / 10 Sivan, 5775
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post


PARSHA VIDEO

Shmot: If Midrash is Real, Why Isn’t It Peshat?

We need to put ourselves into the eyes of Pharaoh's daughter.

Pharaohs daughter

Welcome the book of Exodus! In this video, we explore the strange midrash in which the arm of Pharaoh’s daughter stretched through the river to fetch Moses. Why do the Sages tell us such an odd story? Rabbi Fohrman argues that we need to put ourselves into the eyes of Pharaoh’s daughter, and help us see that when we want to achieve something, God will help us find a way to do it.



Visit AlphaBeta.

About the Author: Rabbi David Fohrman is the dean of Aleph Beta Academy. He has taught at Johns Hopkins University, and was a lead writer and editor for ArtScroll's Talmud translation project. Aleph Beta creates videos to help people experience Torah in way that is relevant and meaningful to them. for more videos, visit: alephbeta.org.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

One Response to “Shmot: If Midrash is Real, Why Isn’t It Peshat?”

  1. Stan Levy says:

    Dear Rabbi David Fohrman, your teaching on Midrash Agaddah was excellent and very moving… I do have some questions for you..

    Is Midrash Agaddah homily? Is Peshat homily? Does the Talmud teach in 3 different places that a verse shall not depart from its simple intended meaning?

    I can understand a Jew being able to know the difference and how to tie in Pshat with Midrash, but let me ask you this..

    There are many Christian Missionaries who love to take our Rabbis words in Talmud and use it to their benefit, such as trying to say that the Rabbis agree with Christianity that Isaiah 53 is about The Messiah being the suffering servant and not about Israel being the suffering servant.

    Did the Rabbis who speak on this subject in Talmud believe that Messiah has already come and suffered?

    Do they believe that when he comes in the future that Messiah will individually/independent of Israel suffer as is depicted in Isaiah 53?

    Do they really believe that? OR, were the Rabbis using homily and just borrowing from verses in this chapter to teach a lesson or to make a theological point and thus "alluding" to chapter 53 that it is speaking about Messiah who suffers as the chapter indicates.

    Before I take this further I would appreciate your input on the above.

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
FIFA president Sepp (Joseph) Blatter and PM Benjamin Netanayhu
Netanyahu Warns FIFA: Palestinian Threats Will Destroy International Sport
Latest Judaism Stories
Grunfeld-Raphael-logo

Why did so many of our great sages from the Rambam to Rabbi Moshe Feinstein live outside Israel?

Daf-Yomi-logo

Casting A Doubt
‘Shall We Say [They] Are Not Valid?’
(Nedarim 5a-7a)

Lessons-in-Emunah-new

I was about six years old at the time and recall that very special occasion so well.

Q-A-Klass-logo

Question: Should we wash our hands in the bathroom with soap and water, or by pouring water from a vessel with handles three times, alternating hands? I have heard it said that a vessel is used only in the morning upon awakening. What are the rules pertaining to young children? What is the protocol if no vessel is available? Additionally, may we dry our hands via an electric dryer?

Harry Koenigsberg
(Via E-Mail)

Why was Samson singled out as the only Shofet required to be a nazir from cradle to grave?

“What do you mean?” asked the secretary. “We already issued a ruling and closed the case.”

Tosafos suggests several answers as to how a minor can own an item, m’d’Oraisa.

This week’s video discusses the important connection between the Priestly Blessing and parenting.

Many of us simply don’t get the need for the Torah to list the exact same gift offering, 12 times!

There is a great debate as to whether this story actually took place or is simply a metaphor, a prophetic vision shown to Hoshea by Hashem.

Every person is presented with moments when he/she must make difficult decisions about how to proceed.

One does not necessarily share the opinions of one’s brother. One may disapprove of his actions, values, and/or beliefs. However, with brothers there is a bond of love and caring that transcends all differences.

This Shavuot let’s give G-d a gift too: Let’s make this year different by doing just 1 more mitzvah

Question: Should we wash our hands in the bathroom with soap and water, or by pouring water from a vessel with handles three times, alternating hands? I have heard it said that a vessel is used only in the morning upon awakening. What are the rules pertaining to young children? What is the protocol if […]

God and the divine origin of His Torah are facts even though we do not fully comprehend them.

More Articles from Rabbi David Fohrman
Naso Lecture

This week’s video discusses the important connection between the Priestly Blessing and parenting.

Why does the Torah use two different words for “to count,” and what does each indicate?

What does the omer & agricultural laws pe’ah & leket teach about the Biblical approach to holidays?

Rabbi Fohrman asks what’s the connection between animal sacrifices and leaving crops for the poor?

Rabbi Fohrman connects the metzora purification process with the korban pesach.

What do we learn about overcoming loss from the argument between Moses and Aaron’s remaining 2 sons?

Rabbi Fohrman considers what it mean to bring God into this world through space and through time.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/jewish-columns/rabbi-david-fohrman/shmot-if-midrash-is-real-why-isnt-it-peshat/2013/12/20/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: