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October 13, 2015 / 30 Tishri, 5776
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Shmot: If Midrash is Real, Why Isn’t It Peshat?

We need to put ourselves into the eyes of Pharaoh's daughter.

Pharaohs daughter

Welcome the book of Exodus! In this video, we explore the strange midrash in which the arm of Pharaoh’s daughter stretched through the river to fetch Moses. Why do the Sages tell us such an odd story? Rabbi Fohrman argues that we need to put ourselves into the eyes of Pharaoh’s daughter, and help us see that when we want to achieve something, God will help us find a way to do it.

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About the Author: Rabbi David Fohrman is the dean of Aleph Beta Academy. He has taught at Johns Hopkins University, and was a lead writer and editor for ArtScroll's Talmud translation project. Aleph Beta creates videos to help people experience Torah in way that is relevant and meaningful to them. for more videos, visit: alephbeta.org.

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One Response to “Shmot: If Midrash is Real, Why Isn’t It Peshat?”

  1. Stan Levy says:

    Dear Rabbi David Fohrman, your teaching on Midrash Agaddah was excellent and very moving… I do have some questions for you..

    Is Midrash Agaddah homily? Is Peshat homily? Does the Talmud teach in 3 different places that a verse shall not depart from its simple intended meaning?

    I can understand a Jew being able to know the difference and how to tie in Pshat with Midrash, but let me ask you this..

    There are many Christian Missionaries who love to take our Rabbis words in Talmud and use it to their benefit, such as trying to say that the Rabbis agree with Christianity that Isaiah 53 is about The Messiah being the suffering servant and not about Israel being the suffering servant.

    Did the Rabbis who speak on this subject in Talmud believe that Messiah has already come and suffered?

    Do they believe that when he comes in the future that Messiah will individually/independent of Israel suffer as is depicted in Isaiah 53?

    Do they really believe that? OR, were the Rabbis using homily and just borrowing from verses in this chapter to teach a lesson or to make a theological point and thus "alluding" to chapter 53 that it is speaking about Messiah who suffers as the chapter indicates.

    Before I take this further I would appreciate your input on the above.

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