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October 25, 2014 / 1 Heshvan, 5775
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‘Be Not Afraid Of Greatness’

The radical claim of Torah is that God is known, not exclusively but primarily, through Jewish history and through the ways Jews live.
Rabbi Sacks

Embedded in this week’s parshah are two of the most fundamental commands of Judaism – commands that touch on the very nature of Jewish identity: “Do not desecrate My holy name. I must be sanctified among the Israelites. I am the Lord, who made you holy and who brought you out of Egypt to be your God. I am the Lord” (Leviticus 22:32).

The two commands are respectively the prohibition against desecrating God’s name (Chillul Hashem) and the positive corollary (Kiddush Hashem) that we are commanded to sanctify God’s name. What are these commands and what do they mean?

First we must understand the concept of “name” as it applies to God. A name is how we are known to others. God’s “name” is therefore His standing in the world. Do people acknowledge Him, respect Him, honor Him?

The commands of Kiddush Hashem and Chillul Hashem locate that responsibility in the conduct and fate of the Jewish people. This is what Isaiah meant when he said: “You are my witnesses, says God, that I am God” (Isaiah 43:10).

The God of Israel is the God of all humanity. He created the universe and life itself. He made all of us – Jew and non-Jew alike – in His image. He cares for all of us. “His tender mercies are on all His works” (Psalms 145:9).

Yet the God of Israel is radically unlike the gods in which the ancients believed, and the reality in which today’s scientific atheists believe. He is not identical with nature. He created nature. He is not identical with the physical universe. He transcends the universe. He is not capable of being mapped by science: observed, measured, quantified. He is not that kind of thing at all. How then is He known?

The radical claim of Torah is that He is known, not exclusively but primarily, through Jewish history and through the ways Jews live. As Moses says at the end of his life:

Ask now about the former days, long before your time, from the day God created human beings on the earth; ask from one end of the heavens to the other. Has anything so great as this ever happened, or has anything like it ever been heard of? Has any other people heard the voice of God speaking out of fire, as you have, and lived? Has any god ever tried to take for himself one nation out of another nation, by testings, by signs and wonders, by war, by a mighty hand and an outstretched arm, or by great and awesome deeds, like all the things the Lord your God did for you in Egypt before your very eyes? (Deuteronomy 4:32-34)

Thirty-three centuries ago, Moses already knew that Jewish history was and would continue to be unique. No other nation has survived such trials. The revelation of God to Israel was unique. No other religion is built on a direct revelation of God to an entire people as happened at Mount Sinai. Therefore God – the God of revelation and redemption – is known to the world through Israel. In ourselves we are testimony to something beyond ourselves. We are God’s ambassadors to the world.

Therefore, when we behave in such a way as to evoke admiration for Judaism as a faith and a way of life, that is a Kiddush Hashem, a sanctification of God’s name. When we do the opposite – when we betray that faith and way of life, causing people to have contempt for the God of Israel – that is a Chillul Hashem, a desecration of God’s name.

About the Author: Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks, former chief rabbi of the British Commonwealth, is the author of many books of Jewish thought, most recently “The Great Partnership: Science, Religion, and the Search for Meaning.”


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3 Responses to “‘Be Not Afraid Of Greatness’”

  1. Proof that this man never deserved the role of Chief Rabbi. Observant Jews never write G-d 's name in full. So what does make Mr. Sacks?

  2. Israel was chosen for two reasons: they suffered under the hands of the nations around them; and, they were able to survive under this suffering, yet still maintain a familial identity.

    They were also chosen for two purposes: to be a sign to all the other nations how obedience to Hashem is rewarded; and, to be a sign to all other nations how straying is punished.

    So, Israel does not really maintain a permanent "favored" status. As the firstborn, they bring either honor or shame their Father. If they bring shame before Hashem, Hashem will give all that is theirs to Hashem's other children. But if they honor Hashem, they maintain their original status as Hashem's heirs to the Kingdom.

    Hashem has many heirs among those who do Hashem's will, no mater their people or nation.

    For good or evil, Israel is a symbol, and an example; and what happens to them will also happen to every other nation, in the same circumstances. Israel was chosen because they can take it, and still survive as Israel. Hashem has provided them with the means to make good; the rest is all up to them.

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