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July 1, 2015 / 14 Tammuz, 5775
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Let’s Connect…Diversely

Secular woman talking with ultra-Orthodox youth

Photo Credit: Nati Shohat/Flash90

I would submit that if such a reality was more common in Israel, they would also play in the same park, and the incident above would hopefully not have to be posted on a “list,” precisely at the time of the year in which we should be engaging in “senseless love” rather than the opposite.

About the Author: Rabbi Yehoshua Grunstein is Director of training and placement at The Straus-Amiel Institute at Ohr Torah Stone.


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