web analytics
May 28, 2015 / 10 Sivan, 5775
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post


Home » Judaism » Parsha »

L’rtzonchem – Accepting His Will

YU-050214

It begins with the laws of tumah for Kohanim, moves over to laws of sacrifices, laws of holidays and ends with the story of one who cursed Hashem. A key to the underlying unity of the parsha can be found in the commentary of the Ketav Sofer on the verse, “And when you offer a thanksgiving sacrifice to G-d, offer it l’rtzonchem,” with your good will (Vayikra, 22, 29).

A thanksgiving sacrifice brought by a person saved from a dangerous condition commemorates a minor miracle. The Ketav Sofer points out that although it would appear that the individual is thrilled with the result and automatically brings the korban with a tremendous feeling of gratitude, in reality the entire situation is against his will. He would have rather not been in danger and not need to be saved in the first place! Therefore, the Torah specifies, bring the sacrifice with all your good will, “l’rtzonchem.” Bring it out of a feeling that all that G-d does, even the illness, the imprisonment, the pain and suffering is all for the best – that G-d loves those He tests.

I believe this perspective serves as the glue that connects the pieces of Parshat Emor together. At the end of the parsha when the individual cursed, he did it out of anger with G-d that he did not receive a portion of the land with the tribe of Dan. He may have had a very noble motive in desiring to be a full member of Bnei Yisrael and share in their destiny. However, to curse G-d for that inability is the opposite of “l’rzonchem”- of accepting G-d’s will that he serve G-d from outside the camp of Israel, rather than inside.

This theme also runs through the beginning of the parsha, where we find commandments of how a Kohen is to relate to four different situations, which, if they occurred to us or someone we loved, we would surely cause us to complain to G-d. 1) The commandments regarding death and suffering, 2) the Kohen’s being blemished which renders him unable to take part in the avoda in the Beis HaMikdash, 3) the Kohen becoming tamei, also excluding him from his unique tasks, and 4) a sacrifice possessing a blemish, which prevents its owner from bringing it as a korban. Perhaps the message is that all these siuations should be accepted “l’rtzonchem.”

In Pirkei Avot it states, “Don’t say when I have time, I will learn – perhaps you will never have time.” The Slonimer Rebbe explains, perhaps G-d wants us specifically to learn Torah in a framework of not having time. That is also our challenge – to learn Torah properly under difficult circumstances and feel it is “l’rtzonchem.”

About the Author: Rabbi Dovid Miller serves as a Rosh Yeshiva at YU-affiliated Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary and Rosh Kollel of the Caroline and Joseph S. Gruss Institute in Jerusalem.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “L’rtzonchem – Accepting His Will”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
FIFA president Sepp (Joseph) Blatter and PM Benjamin Netanayhu
Netanyahu Warns FIFA: Palestinian Threats Will Destroy International Sport
Latest Judaism Stories
Grunfeld-Raphael-logo

Why did so many of our great sages from the Rambam to Rabbi Moshe Feinstein live outside Israel?

Daf-Yomi-logo

Casting A Doubt
‘Shall We Say [They] Are Not Valid?’
(Nedarim 5a-7a)

Lessons-in-Emunah-new

I was about six years old at the time and recall that very special occasion so well.

Q-A-Klass-logo

Question: Should we wash our hands in the bathroom with soap and water, or by pouring water from a vessel with handles three times, alternating hands? I have heard it said that a vessel is used only in the morning upon awakening. What are the rules pertaining to young children? What is the protocol if no vessel is available? Additionally, may we dry our hands via an electric dryer?

Harry Koenigsberg
(Via E-Mail)

Why was Samson singled out as the only Shofet required to be a nazir from cradle to grave?

“What do you mean?” asked the secretary. “We already issued a ruling and closed the case.”

Tosafos suggests several answers as to how a minor can own an item, m’d’Oraisa.

This week’s video discusses the important connection between the Priestly Blessing and parenting.

Many of us simply don’t get the need for the Torah to list the exact same gift offering, 12 times!

There is a great debate as to whether this story actually took place or is simply a metaphor, a prophetic vision shown to Hoshea by Hashem.

Every person is presented with moments when he/she must make difficult decisions about how to proceed.

One does not necessarily share the opinions of one’s brother. One may disapprove of his actions, values, and/or beliefs. However, with brothers there is a bond of love and caring that transcends all differences.

This Shavuot let’s give G-d a gift too: Let’s make this year different by doing just 1 more mitzvah

Question: Should we wash our hands in the bathroom with soap and water, or by pouring water from a vessel with handles three times, alternating hands? I have heard it said that a vessel is used only in the morning upon awakening. What are the rules pertaining to young children? What is the protocol if […]

God and the divine origin of His Torah are facts even though we do not fully comprehend them.

More Articles from Rabbi Dovid Miller
YU-050214

Parshas Emor appears to be as diverse as a parsha can be.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/parsha/lrtzonchem-accepting-his-will/2014/05/02/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: